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8

You write Fortran statements. The Intel Fortran compiler translates those statements into assembler including calls to system functions. For example, strncmp is an ISO C standard function to compare parts of strings. So it looks like you are writing Fortran statements to compare strings, and the Intel Fortran compiler is calling an existing function to ...


7

Use this with the Intel compiler: icc -E -dM - < /dev/null Note that with gcc, the -E option is also required if you want to use the -dM preprocessor option.


7

You can define the return type before the function symbol, but it is limited. It is an older way meant only for simpler cases. The rules are somewhat obscure and I do not remember them by heart, but here is what the standard says: The type and type parameters (if any) of the result of the function defined by a function subprogram may be specified by a type ...


7

There are few issues here that don't let names of the objects match. First, specify in the C++ code that the external functions have the C signature: In test.cpp: extern "C" int Add( int *, int * ); extern "C" int Multiply( int *, int * ); See In C++ source, what is the effect of extern "C"? for more details. In your Fortran code, make the ...


7

There is nothing in the standard that specifies the suffix of the files. Intel always stated, that they treat *.f90 as the suffix for the free source format irrespective of the standard version. It is just a convention not based on any standard document. Maybe the f90 suffix is little unfortunate, looking like just for Fortran 90, but you shouldn't hesitate ...


6

No, gfortran doesn't yet support the ieee_exceptions module. If you'd like to track the status of this issue, or better yet help out, see http://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=29383 . A workaround would be to implement functions in C/asm that get/set the FP trapping status register and call those from Fortran. PS.: GFortran does have a switch ...


6

No, it is not a compiler bug. Here's an edit of your code which has at least a chance of compiling: program iiuu implicit none REAL*8 d d=POTENCIAL(1.0d0,1.0d0,1.0d0,1.0d0,1.4d0,1.4d0) write(*,*) 'potential=', d contains real*8 FUNCTION POTENCIAL(R1,R2,R3,R4,R5,R6) REAL*8 R1,R2,R3,R4,R5,R6,V2,V3,V4 real*8, DIMENSION(6) :: R R(1)=R1 ...


5

It is a Fortran 2003 feature: "When MODULE is specified, procedure-name_list can only contain module procedures. When MODULE is not specified, procedure-name_list may contain procedure pointers, external procedures, dummy procedures, or module procedures." Your version 11.1 is obsolete, current release is 13, but I am not sure if it is supported now. In ...


5

You should expect small difference between the same program compiled by different compilers. Finite precision arithmetic doesn't obey the rules that we expect for real numbers. So if the compilers change the order of operations, the results may differ slightly. That said, gfortran 4.1 is very old to point of being obsolete. I wouldn't use a version of ...


5

NaN signifies not a number, and since there are many, different, reasons a calculation could give that result, they generally do not compare as equal against themselves. If you want to do nan-testing, fortran compilers that support the f2003 standard (which is recent versions of most compilers) have ieee_is_nan in the ieee_arithmetic module: program ...


5

for ifort: -v will show the tool commands and execute them -dryrun will show the tool commands but will not execute


5

Why do you have the source FrontBackSub.f90 two times in the compile command? Just don't do that.


4

You're best off just using a linear algebra package that is already well optimized for a multitcore environment and using that for your matrix-vector multiplication. The Atlas package, gotoblas (if you have a nehalem or older; sadly it's no longer being updated), or vendor BLAS implementations (like MKL for intel CPUs, ACML for AMD, or VecLib for apple, ...


4

It would work if you passed alpha and beta as double precision numerical constants (eg, 1.d0), but you're passing it single precision constants, and Fortran 77 has no way of knowing dgemm's argument list and promoting the reals to double precision. (It might work with the single precision constants if you used MKL's Fortran 95 interface, but I'm not sure). ...


4

A -traceback flag may be used with Intel and Portland Group Fortran compilers to request additional information to be generated in object files for line and source traceback. When a severe error occurs during run time, the program will attempt to report line number and source file where the error occured, as well as line numbers and source files from parent ...


4

I am not sure if there is an intrinsic tool that does this. I do not know why ifort accepts this, and my guess would be that it is a compiler specific functionality. an option to to this, specifically since you want this to be bullet proof, is to create your own function. I have not tested this, but the following might work: double precision function ...


4

In addition to writing a function to handle this, you could also directly use the intrinsic merge function: b = merge(1.d0, 0.d0, a). Or you could write a defined assignment subroutine that does this, so that you can just type b = a.


4

Searching the web, I find that statement that two consecutive operators are not allowed. Therefore interpreting rather than rejecting this expression is an extension to the language. That extension has been implemented differently by different compiler vendors. Indeed, when I use gfortran with restrictive compiler options, it rejects this code example: ...


4

I think you may be mixing the free format program and the fixed format include files. You will have to have both files in the same format, or in the "intersection format" from http://fortranwiki.org/fortran/show/Continuation+lines Another cause of an error would be using the include statement in the wrong part of the file. It must be placed in the right ...


4

I think that you are getting this warning because the subroutines are being passed non-contiguous array sections and the compiler has decided that the subroutine should get a contiguous temporary array containing the necessary values. I expect that the subroutine code is written in terms of an array and implicitly assumes, as we always do when programming in ...


4

Investigate the options -ffixed-line-length -ffree-line-length


4

There is academic license available from Intel, just look in their e-shop or ask your local reseller. It is not free of charge, however. I am using compiler covered by this license every day. It should include also the binary redistribution, but much better place for questions like this is the Intel Support Forums


4

If you index an array out of bounds anything can happen. It is an undefined behavior according to the standard. That's why there is the check option you mentioned - to specify what happens at least for the particular implementation. But the program runs slower then. What really happens is that you probably (you didn't show the actual error messages!) ...


4

Function splitting is an optimisation technique affecting how functions are inlined. I can't honestly say that I fully understand it so I won't try to explain it badly. See this paper and the other sources it refers to for more details. To implement it in Fortran code, you just use your compiler; as you observe the Intel compiler uses a flag called ...


4

Let a = (/1,3,4,5,7,9,11/) then pack(a,mod(a,2)/=0) will return the odd elements of a. This isn't quite the same as removing the 3rd element, but your question suggests that removing the even element(s) is really what you want to do. If you declare integer, dimension(:), allocatable :: oddones then oddones = pack(a,mod(a,2)/=0) will leave ...


4

dcos is an obsolete form of cosine where the programming explicitly instructs the compiler that the argument is double precision. The modern way (for decades!) is to just use cos and have the compiler automatically figure out which version to use. Here you have arguments for dcos, etc., which are not double precision, so the compiler is complaining. I ...


3

That diagnostic is reported against the DO statement. As one specific example: When i is 2, the loop sets num(8) to false. When i is 4, the loop also sets num(8) to false. That's two different iterations of the loop writing to the same memory location. (The relevant Intel forums are a better place to ask questions that might get into the specifics of ...


3

Intel Fortran 12.1.5 does not support the form or meaning of a procedure-stmt (the statement inside the interface block that the error refers to) without the leading MODULE keyword. (Consequently the compiler has classified the line as a procedure-declaration-stmt - hence the two errors.) The form of the procedure statement without the leading module was ...


3

This has been the way that Fortran loops work for decades and you can't simply change this with a compiler option. The Fortran standard clearly states: 8.1.4.4.1 Loop initiation (2) The DO variable becomes defined with the value of the initial parameter m1. (3) The iteration count is established and is the value of the expression MAX (INT ...


3

Looks like you are seeing Fortran I/O operations. Formatted I/O is quite slow in ifort. If standard input/standard output redirection is used, it gets even worse; and still worse with pipes -- Intel docs specifically warn against doing it. gfortran is not nearly as bad, but still pretty slow. Some possibilities are: try to do as few I/O calls as possible ...



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