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62

Your routine only handles ASCII characters. The system one handles all unicode characters. Consider following example: public class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println((int) 'ě'); // => 283 System.out.println((int) 'Ě'); // => 282 } }


57

Your method is incorrect in many ways. For instance, it considers "!" equal to "B", "B" equal to "1", but "!" not equal to "1" (so it isn't transitive as we would expect an equals method to be). Yes, it is quite easy to write an incorrect implementation for that method that is both faster and simpler. A fair challenge would be to write a correct one, i.e. ...


55

Use something like this - SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE UPPER(COL_NAME) LIKE UPPER('%PriceOrder%') or SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE LOWER(COL_NAME) LIKE LOWER('%PriceOrder%')


39

Use a regular expression: var regex = new Regex( "camel", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase ); var newSentence = regex.Replace( sentence, "horse" ); Of course, this will also match words containing camel, but it's not clear if you want that or not. If you need exact matches you can use a custom MatchEvaluator. public static class Evaluators { public static ...


21

Server-side, "(?i)" can be used, but this doesn't work client-side. See here for more discussion and workaround. i.e. "...(?i)(jpg|jpeg|gif|png|wpf|..."


19

Just replace (?i) with (?iu) - it will turn on unicode case-insensitive matching


15

Add an extension method for string to do the trick: Usage: string yourString = "TEXTTOREPLACE"; yourString.Replace("texttoreplace", "Look, I Got Replaced!", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase); Code: using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using System.IO; public static class Extensions { public static string Replace(this string source, ...


11

This might not be the only reason, but the fact that your solution doesn't actually work for all possible strings is definitely a factor. There are some (annoying) locales for which two characters might have the same upper case but not the same lower case. For this reason, in order to work (most of the time, see Turkish), the canonical implementation must ...


8

I would not recommend upper-casing or lower-casing as others have suggested. That can cause issues in some cultures, particularly Turkish. Instead, use String.Equals(String, StringComparison): If COMMAND_TEXT.Text.Equals("command", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) You may want to use InvariantCultureIgnoreCase or OrdinalIgnoreCase - it depends ...


6

Can be shortened a little bit public Commands HasCommand(string cmd) { return AllowedCommands.FirstOrDefault(c => c.Alias.Contains(cmd, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase)); } but it's pretty much the same thing.


6

Your comparison is failing because of the whitespace, not because of the case. This is happening because when you use the iwhite option, in the background, vimdiff is executing a diff -b which is more restrictive about how it compares whitespace than what you're looking for. More specifically, the -b option only ignores differences in the amount of ...


6

I found out it's ignoring case by default.


6

I don't believe string has an overload of Contains taking a StringComparison. However, you could use IndexOf which does: if (body.IndexOf("software", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) != -1)


6

Alternatively you can use TreeSet. public static void main(String[] args){ Set<String> s1 = new TreeSet<String>(String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER); s1.addAll(Arrays.asList(new String[] {"a", "b", "c"})); Set<String> s2 = new TreeSet<String>(String.CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER); s2.addAll(Arrays.asList(new String[] {"A", "B", ...


5

You need something like this boost::regex regex("your expression here", boost::regex::icase); boost::smatch what; string mystring; bool search_result = boost::regex_search(mystring.begin(),mystring.end(), what, regex);


4

The CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER you created is an anonymous class, which cannot be serialized in GWT. To make it GWT serializable, you need to Create a custom top-level class (like CaseInsensitiveOrder implements Comparator<..>, Serializable { ... } Create a constant CASE_INSENSITIVE_ORDER like you did. Create a custom field serializer for that ...


4

By default (?i) works only with ASCII characters - see Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE for details. You could combine that flag with UNICODE_CASE together like so: phrase = Pattern.compile(word, UNICODE_CASE | CASE_INSENSITIVE).matcher(phrase).replaceAll("");


4

The first problem is that you are not allowing for whitespace in your regex between tabs. The correct regex (tested in Rubular) is: <div class=""?main""?>\s*<div class=""?subsection1""?>\s*<h2>\s*<div class=\"?subwithoutquote\"?>(.+?)<\/div>\s* Notice the addition of several \s* entries. The second problem is that you're ...


4

You could use toLowerCase if (message.toLowerCase().startsWith("!spoiler")) {


4

I think that the checking of String1.equalsIgnoreCase(String2) the one which is provided has a much better character acceptance and it accepts all kind of Character Values included in the Unicode;but; what you have tried to figure out through your custom code is that you are comparing only the English Alphabetical characters. So, I think,on the lines of ...


4

Your problem is not from the Replace() method - it's the Contains() method. Whenever you call Contains() on a string it will perform case-sensitive comparison so the following line will always return false: "Some Claims".Contains("claims"); In order to overcome this you should use String.IndexOf(String, Int32) method: for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) ...


4

It's one of the (rare) use-cases for an anonymous function: >>> sorted([[1, 'C'], [2, 'D'], [3, 'a'], [4, 'b']], key=lambda x: x[1].lower()) [[3, 'a'], [4, 'b'], [1, 'C'], [2, 'D']] Lambdas are generally a bit clunky and unpythonic, but unfortunately, there is no "compose" function built-in to python.


4

Either a lambda: sorted(unsortedlist, key=lambda x: x[1].lower()) or a regular function: def my_key(x): return x[1].lower() sorted(unsortedlist, key=my_key)


3

Utiltize StringComparison because of its handy OrdinalIgnoreCase string sentence = "We know it contains 'camel' word."; string wordToFind = "camel"; string replacementWord = "horse"; int index = sentence.IndexOf(wordToFind , StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) // Did we match the word regardless of case bool match = index >= 0; ...


3

I wouldn't use a .NET class name for the name of a variable as things could get confusing. This works, and I changed out the Trim functions so that case is ignored: Imports System.Text.RegularExpressions Module Module1 Public Function GetStringInBetween(beginMarker As String, endMarker As String, searchText As String, includeMarkers As Boolean) As ...


3

You can use regular expression to match a string search in C#. You also have the option to ignore case. if (System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.IsMatch(s, sPattern, System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions.IgnoreCase)) This link might be useful: How to: Search Strings Using Regular Expressions (C# Programming Guide)


3

Convert the extension to lowercase using ToLower and then compare If file.Extension.ToLower = ".lnk" Then MsgBox(file.Extension) And forget Regex for this. It's really overkill and inappropriate


3

I finally figured this one out. Well, at least part of it. It turns out that the 'MultiViews' option was responsible for resolving files without the '.php' extension. That, in combination with these two lines in my '/etc/apache2/sites-available/default' file, gives me the behavior I desire: RewriteEngine On RewriteRule ^/(.*)$ /${lc:$1} Unfortunately, I ...


3

You need to OR them together in this case. const string pattern = @"<div class=""?main""?><div class=""?subsection1""?><h2><div class=""?subwithoutquote""?>(.+?)</div>"; Match m = Regex.Match(html, pattern, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.Singleline) Edit: Change your RegEx to the following ... const string pattern = ...



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