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3

Too bad about imfindcircles! One thing I can suggest is to invoke regionprops and specify the 'Area' and 'BoundingBox' flags. regionprops was available in MATLAB for as long as I can remember, so we can certainly use it here. What this will do is that whatever distinct objects that are seen in the image that are connected, we will find both their areas ...


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Here is an alternative solution to imfindcircles. Basically threshold the image, dilate it with a disk structuring element and then, after finding the edges, apply a Hough transform to detect the circle using the circle_hough algorithm available form the file exchange here. Here is the code: clear clc close all A = imread('CircleIm.jpg'); %// Some ...


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It's PixelFormats.Prgba64, reading MSDN you may be confused because there is a small error in documentation: it states it's 32 bit per channel. Prgba64 is a sRGB format with 64 bits per pixel (BPP). Each channel (blue, green, red, and alpha) is allocated 32 bits per pixel (BPP). Each color channel is pre-multiplied by the alpha value. This format has a ...


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The image degradation in your image does not look like it was caused by conversion to grayscale... It looks more like compression or sub-sampling artifacts. VideoWriter uses compressed Motion JPEG format by default. Are you sure you are using 'Uncompressed Avi'? Also, one of the options for PROFILE parameters of VideoWriter is Grayscale AVI. Try using ...


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You are looking for the morphological skeleton of the image. You can find that with the function bwmorphby: bwmorph(BW,'skel',Inf); See Docs


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Yes there are. As one small example, if you had a binary image where it consists of a bunch of squares that are disconnected and distinct. Provided that you specify a structuring element that is square, and choosing the structuring element so that it is smaller than the smallest square in the image, then doing either operation will give you the same ...


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The issue here is that your image has a depth of 24 bits but you convert it to an 8 bit grey-scale using the solution you linked. I presume ImageJ does the same thing by default. I think you can fix this by replacing 255 with (2^24)-1 in the line map = [(0:255)' (0:255)' (0:255)']/255; and uint8 to uint32 on the next line.


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No they don't have an image processing service. They do have transcoding services for audio and video, though: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/elastictranscoder/latest/developerguide/introduction.html But that's not what you are looking for. The closest you can get to that with AWS is probably by creating your own on-demand instance which can process a batch of ...


1

If you what you mean by "scrambled" is by randomly re-arranging pixels in your image, you can create a random permutation vector that is as long as the total number of pixels in your image, reshape this so that it's the same size as the image, then use this to index into it. Specifically, use randperm to help you do this. As an example, let's use ...


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I would highly recommend using the StageXL library for this (https://pub.dartlang.org/packages/stagexl). It's basically a recreation of the Flash APIs for Dart. It makes doing that sort of thing very easy, and it's often used to create Dart games.


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Yes, there are such images. One of the properties of opening (it's mentioned in wiki article, for example) is that it is an anti-extensive operation, i.e. if Y is opening of X, then Y ⊆ X. Similarly, closing is an extensive operation (i.e. X ⊆ Y), therefore for any such image X = Y. Any image invariant to both opening and closing will satisfy your ...


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You could try a hard cap. Either save the locations of the white points before the convolution or find the location of all points > 1 and set them to 1 like this: B(B>1) = 1


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There are a few differences / errors: They use the centre of the image as the origin They scale the axis appropriately. In your example, you're plotting your angle (between 0 and in your case, pi), instead of utilising the full height of the image. You're using the wrong atan function (atan2 works a lot better in this situation :)) Not amazingly important, ...


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How do they make the descriptor rotation-invariant? This is explained by D. Lowe in the original SIFT paper (see Chapter 5. Orientation Assignment): By assigning a consistent orientation to each keypoint based on local image properties, the keypoint descriptor can be represented relative to this orientation and therefore achieve invariance to image ...


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ImageJ works well headless; see http://imagej.net/Headless. So you could certainly build a server application which uses ImageJ based on any of several different Java server platforms (JBoss, Glassfish, Jersey, etc.). Especially if you leverage the new ImageJ2 API, there is a good separation of concerns which would allow you to build an effective ...


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The statement DIBR can be used is wrong. DIBR is a method that works with 3D videos, using the depth image to enhance the 2D view. It is not fully automated, you need to supply the depth map by hand for DIBR to work. You can, however, use 2 cameras to obtain 3D information from 2 x 2D; or use 2D video to estimate depth from pixel motion. Some other ...


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Seemed like an interesting problem, so I gave it a shot. Basically you start with a Sobel filter to find the edges in your image (after slight denoising). Then clean up the resulting lines, use them to separate regions within your binary mask of the hand, use a watershed transform to find the wrist, some distance transforms to find other landmarks, then ...


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I think that using raw graylevel values in computing distances is a very bad idea. This is not invariant to illumination, to translation and to rotation (although I don't think that rotation is a big issue in face images). Try to use some robust and invariant descriptor extracted from each image (e.g. SIFT on keypoints) and then compute distances between ...


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If you have a large number of images in your database, it will get rather unwieldy calculating the similarity between a given image and every single image in your database every time. Instead, I would consider something like a Perceptual Hash (pHash) where you could pre-compute a parameter ONCE for each image in your database and store it, and then , when ...


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See skimage.feature.plot_matches, pass empty list of keypoints and matches if you only want to plot the images without points.


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Maybe try the following: pick some random 10 pixels from borders of selection (it is important that those are borders) get average rgb of those pixels get MAX = max color distance between pixels perform white flood fill with tolerance = k*MAX, starting from one of edge pixels this way you should be able to flood fill only the gray background in selection ...


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Here is another approach to solve this problem. It´s not based on Hough Transform, as imfindcircles and previous answer are. Basically: Segment the image (threshold is estimated using Otsu´s method) Find connected components and leave just 2% of them, starting from those whose area is bigger Dilate the image with a circle (disk) of small radius Find ...


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use php "pathinfo" function to get extension. $ext = pathinfo($_FILES['news_image']['name'], PATHINFO_EXTENSION); $file_type = pathinfo($_FILES['files']['name'][$key], PATHINFO_EXTENSION); Reference For pathinfo


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Prefiltered cubic b-spline interpolation delivers good results (you can have a look here for some theoretical background). CUDA source code can be downloaded here. WebGL examples can be found here.



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