New answers tagged

0

I wouldn't worry too much about the exact geometry and calibration and rather find the window by its own characteristics. Binarization works relatively well, be it on the whole image or in a large region of interest. Then you can select the most likely blob based on it approximate area and/or circularity.


0

Whatever contours you are getting from cv2.findcontours() is a python list. You just convert it into array like this: arr_contours = np.array(contours) For making the background white, you can iterate through the output resulted from grabcut and replace the black pixels with 255 which is white. This is the simplest way


0

Using this link as reference I have successfully transformed the image close to the one hugin generated. It still need to subpixel sampling for image better image quality #include <iostream> #include <sstream> #include <time.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <opencv2/core/core.hpp> #include <opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp&...


0

When you apply such a transformation, you want to find 3 points in the input image, and the exact same three points in the target image. See an example here with a multiple points, but three are enough for an affine transformation. Then the registration is going to modify/twist the input image in order to register/align the triplets of points. The best ...


0

Yes so linear equations helps to solve the problem. Some Java code which solves the problem is located here, note that it builds with Scala SBT but its Java code. https://github.com/PhilAndrew/betweenrgb The merging of weighted colors is tested here: https://github.com/PhilAndrew/betweenrgb/blob/master/src/test/java/between/rgb/FindWeightedColorsTest.java


0

Some Java code which solves the problem is located here, note that it builds with Scala SBT but its Java code. https://github.com/PhilAndrew/betweenrgb The merging of weighted colors is tested here: https://github.com/PhilAndrew/betweenrgb/blob/master/src/test/java/between/rgb/MergeWeightedColorsTest.java


0

In Matlab you can use the following code % Read image I = double(imread('circit.png')); I = I(:,:,1); % Run thining opreation IThin = bwmorph(~I,'thin',Inf); % Show image imshow(IThin) And the resulted image is:


0

Read the pixel using read_imagef (I recommend it instead of read_imageui, depending on the image format, especially since in your example you are assigning to a float4 variable; check the specification for which is appropriate for each image format). The float4 components returned can then be checked. pixel.x is the red, pixel.y is the green, pixel.z is the ...


0

Use a simple dilation using a small structuring element Find connected component For each connected component i would calculate the ratio between the number of pixels in the component divided by the area of the bounding box i would keep only the ones that are very close to 1.


0

Doing more research I came across this algorithm that takes care of temperature adjustment without doing any color conversions. //code from http://www.tannerhelland.com/5675/simple-algorithms-adjusting-image-temperature-tint/ //Given a temperature adjustment on the range -100 to 100, //apply the following adjustment to each pixel in the image: r = r + ...


1

Here's a quick'n'dirty approach [QR, map] = imread ('qr.png'); % indexed image, so we need to also get the map QR = ind2gray (QR, map); % convert to grayscale QR = fliplr (QR); % x-axis moves rightwards, whereas angle t moves % leftwards, therefore flip left-to-right ...


0

UIColor is based on component values from 0..<1.0, not 0..<256. Divide each component by 255.0 and you should get better results. Also note that your hashing algorithm eliminates red completely (0xff & 0xe0 << 2) = 0 since that math will be done as UInt8.


1

Thanks to FiReTiTi and Micka for helping me to solve this. I used Micka's suggestion. I used the third function of morphologyEx, which allows to manipulate the borders. The code given in the question is replaced with this one: Mat morphKernelClose = Imgproc.getStructuringElement(Imgproc.MORPH_RECT, new org.opencv.core.Size(25, 25)); Point anchor = new ...


0

In your original code, you've got two forms of indexing for Imagepaths inside the parfor loop, and that prevents slicing, which is what you want. See the doc for more on valid indexing forms for sliced variables. The easiest way to convince parfor that what you're doing is OK is to pull out a temporary array from Imagepaths using valid sliced indexing, and ...


1

1.@berak is right.The prototype of function Rect() is Rect(x,y,width,height).So 'j' which refer to 'width' should be 'x'.(Actually I havn't found the prototype of Rect() from http://docs.opencv.org/2.4/index.html ,but cvRect() in the C API is cvRect(x,y,width,height).I think their prototypes maybe the same.) 2.for (int i = 0; i < height; i += 8) and for (...


-1

The idea is to isolate the background form the inside of the drops that look like the background. Therefore i found the connected components for the background and the inside drops took the largest connected component and change its value to be like the foreground value which left me with an image which he inside drops as a different value than the ...


0

Looking at the top image I would say you have no way of doing that fast on a general image by no means. Though this really depends on the image size and your definition of "fast" so lets say that it would be a challenge to draw this under 1 second on an image of size 1024x1024. For a general image you will have 2 procedures: First is to redraw the faded ...


0

I used the following code to detect the number of contours in the image using openCV and python. img = cv2.imread('ba3g0.jpg') gray = cv2.cvtColor(img, cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY) ret,thresh = cv2.threshold(gray,127,255,1) contours,h = cv2.findContours(thresh,1,2) for cnt in contours: cv2.drawContours(img,[cnt],0,(0,0,255),1) For furthur removing the contours ...


0

6264x65985 resolution exceeds Tesseract limits.The maximum width and height are 32767. Resize or rescale your image and try again.


0

As you've known, the InkCanvas in UWP is different from what in Windows Phone 8.1 Silverlight. For how to use InkCanvas in UWP, please see Pen and stylus interactions in UWP apps. To crop inkCanvas drawing from a particular area, we can store ink strokes with using IInkStrokeContainer.SaveAsync method first and then crop the image with BitmapTransform class....


0

I have made some progress, and I pretty much consider this an answer to my question, although some things are a tad different and I don't think this method is very fast. I would love to hear from anyone to see how to make this code faster. In the below, it seems like resizing the image is taking up the most time, I get a TON of calls to the ovveride ...


0

It exists different mammogram databases: National Mammogram Database Mammographic Image Analysis Homepage Digital Mammograhy Homepage Else the best way is to read the best papers from the state of the art and use the same databases as the authors.


2

The simplest solution would be to increase the image size, fill the added contour with black, and then perform the operations: Create a bigger image, completely black. Copy your image in the middle of the new image. Perform the operations Delete the border added (copy the center of the image into a new one).


0

I'm assuming what you mean is that you want to process the image with the exception of pixels containing some specific values (e.g. 0 and 1) Instead of ImgVector = ImgVector(ImgVector ~= 0); ImgVector = ImgVector(ImgVector ~= 1); do ImgVector(ImgVector == 0) = nan; ImgVector(ImgVector == 1) = nan; This way you 'mark' unwanted pixels such that you can ...


0

STILL IN PROGRESS First of all, an RGB image consists of 3 grayscale images. Since you need the green color you will deal only with one channel. The green one. To do so, you can split the image, you can use b,g,r = cv2.split('Your Image'). You will get an output like that if you are showing the green channel: After that you should threshold the image ...


1

Here is a full 3x3 sample: function Test() close all I = imread('un1vY.jpg'); I = double(I)/255; %Convert uint8 to double J = HorizFuse(I); Jtag = cat(3, J(:,:,1)', J(:,:,2)', J(:,:,3)'); %Transpose across 2'nd dimension. K = HorizFuse(Jtag); K = cat(3, K(:,:,1)', K(:,:,2)', K(:,:,3)'); %Transpose back K = ...


0

You can try the following solution: Leave some overlapping area between two attached images. Do linear interpolation between two images in the overlapped area. Linear interpolation: h*A + (1-h)*B when h goes from 0 to 1. Illustration of h (replicated to create an image) for attach images horizontally: I took 100 pixels wide overlap. The following code ...


0

Optical flow is the apparent motion of an object due to a change in the image. For example in the first image a grey spot is left and in the second image it is right. The object thus looks to be moved to the right. However optical flow is only apparent, two mistakes can occur: The object is of a uniform color, and thus there is no apparent motion, even if ...


0

You can set it directly too. Example: Image<Emgu.CV.Structure.Gray, byte> objImagemTemplate = new Image<Emgu.CV.Structure.Gray, byte>(objBitmapTemplate); // Image A objImagemTemplate = (objImagemTemplate.Canny(new Gray(10), new Gray(60)).Sobel(1, 0, 1)).Convert<Gray, Byte>();


1

Right, to go off of Salmans comment, with lossless compression, every bit of data originally in the file remains after its uncompressed. This is generally used for txt documents or spreadsheet files where information can be lost such as financial data. PNG or GIF use lossless compression. What would be the advantage of using loss compression? It makes the ...


1

You could use skimage.measure.regionprops to determine the bounding box of all the regions in your image. For roughly circular blobs the diameter of the minimum enclosing circle can be approximated by the largest side of the bounding box. To do so you just need to add the following snippet at the end of your script: from skimage.measure import regionprops N ...


1

Very simple error. In your loop, after you call subplot(1,2,1); remove the call to imshow(tophatImage);. This is erasing your figure's contents and showing just the image itself. If you want the contours drawn by you with imfreehand to remain, don't call imshow. With imfreehand, the contours should remain until you either close the figure, or change the ...


1

JPG is a lossy format, You will lose information reading it in and writing it out each time you save it. Perhaps try using a non-lossy format such as PNG or GIF.


0

You could look at using "Point Feature Matching". Matlab has a tutorial on this that can be found here. I dont know how well this will work for finding multiples of the same object or finding duplicates of the same object in different orientations but you can experiment with it and find out. I copied some of the code and comments from the link above from ...


0

To draw a line you just need to get the derivative of the function at that point, as you probably remember from basic algebra. You can just do it with finite differences, but I suggest you use more than 2 points, say 5 or 7 to approximate the derivative at that point. Then drawing the line is as easy as y-y0=f'(x) (x-x0) where y0,x0 is the point itself....


2

One can read in the regionprops documentation: Returns:     properties : list of RegionProperties                             Each item describes one labeled region, and can be accessed using the &...


0

Hi in addition to @carrdelling respond, i will add that you may use the same training set, if you normalize your images to have the same range of value. For example you could binaries your data ( 1 if > 0, 0 else ) or you could divide by the maximum intensity in your image to have an arbitrary interval [0;1].


1

If you look at: http://scikit-learn.org/stable/modules/generated/sklearn.datasets.load_digits.html#sklearn.datasets.load_digits you can see that each point in the matrix as a value between 0-16. You can try to transform the values of the image to between 0-16. I did it and now the prediction works well for the digit 9 but not for 8 and 6. It doesn't give 1 ...


2

I tried this code and I got no errors: import numpy as np from skimage.measure import label, regionprops myarray = np.random.randint(1, 4, (11,11), dtype=np.int64) labelled = label(myarray) props = regionprops(labelled) Sample output: In [714]: myarray Out[714]: array([[1, 2, 1, 1, 3, 3, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3], [1, 1, 3, 1, 3, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 2], [...


0

Patching together several postings, here is the working code I ended with. //This puts the selected images in a zip file. ignore_user_abort(true); set_time_limit(0); // disable the time limit for this script $query = "SELECT imagefilename FROM imagetable WHERE accepted = 1 "; $result = mysqli_query($connect, $query); ...


2

1) You need to create your own training set - based on data similar to what you will be making predictions. The call to datasets.load_digits() in scikit-learn is loading a preprocessed version of the MNIST Digits dataset, which, for all we know, could have very different images to the ones that you are trying to recognise. 2) You need to set the parameters ...


1

camera calibration Camera calibration for multi-modal robot vision based on image quality assessment (F PirahanSiah, SNHS Abdullah, S Sahran)Control Conference (ASCC), 2015 10th Asian, 1 - 6


1

in LPR system you should use adaptive threshlding method (_, self.img) = cv2.threshold(self.img, 1, 255, cv2.THRESH_BINARY + cv2.THRESH_OTSU) you use otsu but the adaptive threshold can get better result. the most important step of the LPR system is good threshold+find location of the plate you can read Adaptive image segmentation based on peak ...


1

You can not load a .png format with tkinter. You rather need to use the PIL library for that: import PIL image = PIL.Image.open("bitcoin.png") BTC_img = PIL.ImageTk.PhotoImage(image) BTC_img_label = tk.Label(self, image=BTC_img) BTC_img_label.image = BTC_img BTC_img_label.grid(row=2, column=0) EDIT: Please, create a test.py file and run this EXACT code: ...


0

You should use the fact that you know you are trying to detect a line by using the line hough transform. http://docs.opencv.org/2.4/doc/tutorials/imgproc/imgtrans/hough_lines/hough_lines.html When the obstacle also look like a line use the fact that you know approximately what is the orientation of the green lines. If you don't know the orientation of the ...


1

Let's call the transformation between frame i and i+1 T. Let's look at a point P[i] = (Xi,Yi) in frame i. If we want to know were this point will be in frame i+1 we will just need to apply the transformation T on the point P[i] and get a new point P[i+1] = T(P). In order to get a path the camera did we start from frame 1 with the center point of the image ...


0

Sails.js is a framework built around node.js, so you have access to the File System through const fs = require('fs'); Documentation here https://nodejs.org/api/fs.html. You'll probably do something like fs.readFile('assets/image/loc.jpg', function (err, data) { //do whatever you want with your img 'data' } https://nodejs.org/api/fs.html#...


0

Box sizing was giving me strange results, so I solved this by creating a function that calculates the number of digits in each number and sends a position variable back. function position($value, $pos) { $length = strlen((string)$value); return $pos - (20 * $length); } $value1 = $_GET['r']; $value2 = $_GET['rm']; $value3 = $_GET['w']; $x1 = ...


1

Before to apply the threshold, I would separate the different patterns from the background by using a white top-hat. See here the result. Then you stretch the histogram. Then you can apply what you did.


1

Note that there is such a thing as storing your pixels as 32-bit signed integers according to PIL, and the image mode 'I' is meant to handle this in PIL. So the comments saying this makes no sense due to technical reasons are mistaken. I don't think the PNG format supports this mode(Despite no errors being thrown when you write an Image in mode 'I'). ...



Top 50 recent answers are included