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317

1) Yes, by default Android will scale your image down to fit the ImageView, maintaining the aspect ratio. However, make sure you're setting the image to the ImageView using android:src="..." rather than android:background="...". src= makes it scale the image maintaining aspect ratio, but background= makes it scale and distort the image to make it fit exactly ...


202

Here's a nicely commented Image Manipulation helper class that you can look at and use. I wrote it as an example of how to perform certain image manipulation tasks in C#. You'll be interested in the ResizeImage function that takes a System.Drawing.Image, the width and the height as the arguments. using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using ...


150

As rcar says, you can't without losing some quality, the best you can do in c# is: Bitmap newImage = new Bitmap(newWidth, newHeight); using (Graphics gr = Graphics.FromImage(newImage)) { gr.SmoothingMode = SmoothingMode.HighQuality; gr.InterpolationMode = InterpolationMode.HighQualityBicubic; gr.PixelOffsetMode = PixelOffsetMode.HighQuality; ...


143

See android:adjustViewBounds.


59

To anyone else having this particular issue. You have an ImageView (or other View) that you want to have a width of fill_parent and a height scaled proportionately: Add these two attributes to your ImageView: android:adjustViewBounds="true" android:scaleType="centerCrop" And set the ImageView width to fill_parent and height to wrap_content. Also, if you ...


52

This should do it. private void resizeImage(string path, string originalFilename, /* note changed names */ int canvasWidth, int canvasHeight, /* new */ int originalWidth, int originalHeight) { Image image = Image.FromFile(path + originalFilename); ...


47

I have solved this by creating a java-class that you include in your layout-file: public class DynamicImageView extends ImageView { public DynamicImageView(final Context context, final AttributeSet attrs) { super(context, attrs); } @Override protected void onMeasure(final int widthMeasureSpec, final int heightMeasureSpec) { ...


42

If there's no requirement on preserving file type after scaling I'd recommend the following approach. using (Image src = Image.FromFile("main.gif")) { using (Bitmap dst = new Bitmap(100, 129)) { using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(dst)) { g.SmoothingMode = SmoothingMode.AntiAlias; g.InterpolationMode = ...


36

AffineTransformOp offers the additional flexibility of choosing the interpolation type. BufferedImage before = getBufferedImage(encoded); int w = before.getWidth(); int h = before.getHeight(); BufferedImage after = new BufferedImage(w, h, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB); AffineTransform at = new AffineTransform(); at.scale(2.0, 2.0); AffineTransformOp scaleOp ...


34

Only set the width or height, and it will scale the other automatically. And yes you can use a percentage. The first part can be done, but requires javascript, so might not work for all users.


32

this.PictureBox1.SizeMode = PictureBoxSizeMode.Zoom; Set that property to your PictureBox and the size of the image will increased or decreased to fit the PictureBox maintaining the size ratio. For more info: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.picturebox.sizemode.aspx


31

I found out how to resize AND pad the image by learning from this this CodeProject Article. static Image FixedSize(Image imgPhoto, int Width, int Height) { int sourceWidth = imgPhoto.Width; int sourceHeight = imgPhoto.Height; int sourceX = 0; int sourceY = 0; int destX = 0; int destY = 0; float ...


31

I saw this blog entry, which solves the problem by using a GWT DataResource instead of ImageResource. It turns out that the same technique will actually work with ImageResource, if you use it as follows: Image image = new Image(myImageResource.getURL()); image.setPixelSize(getLength(), getHeight()); To keep aspect ratio calculate it like: Image image = ...


29

Unless you're doing vector graphics, there's no way to resize an image without potentially losing some image quality.


27

You really, really want to use Graphics32. procedure DrawSrcToDst(Src, Dst: TBitmap32); var R: TKernelResampler; begin R := TKernelResampler.Create(Src); R.Kernel := TLanczosKernel.Create; Dst.Draw(Dst.BoundsRect, Src.BoundsRect, Src); end; You have several methods and filters to choose when resampling an image. The example above uses a kernel ...


23

This is the code I use. It supports rotation, and also sets the image resolution to the JPEG standards of 72dpi@24-bit color (by default GDI+ saves images at 96dpi@32-bit color). It also fixes the black/gray border problem that some people experience when resizing images. /// <summary> /// Resizes and rotates an image, keeping the original aspect ...


22

The selection of a particular filter for image processing is something of a black art, because the main criterion for judging the result is subjective: in computer graphics, the ultimate question is almost always: "does it look good?". There are a lot of good filters out there, and the choice between the best frequently comes down to a judgement call. That ...


22

If you want an ImageView that both scales up and down while keeping the proper aspect ratio, add this to your XML: android:adjustViewBounds="true" android:scaleType="fitCenter" Add this to your code: // We need to adjust the height if the width of the bitmap is // smaller than the view width, otherwise the image will be boxed. final double ...


21

Unfortunately the performance of getScaledInstance() is very poor if not problematic. The alternative approach is to create a new BufferedImage and and draw a scaled version of the original on the new one. BufferedImage resized = new BufferedImage(newWidth, newHeight, original.getType()); Graphics2D g = resized.createGraphics(); ...


16

I had the same problem a while back and dealt with it this way: private Image RezizeImage(Image img, int maxWidth, int maxHeight) { if(img.Height < maxHeight && img.Width < maxWidth) return img; using (img) { Double xRatio = (double)img.Width / maxWidth; Double yRatio = (double)img.Height / maxHeight; Double ...


15

When you draw the image using GDI+ it scales quite well in my opinion. You can use this to create a scaled image. If you want to scale your image with GDI+ you can do something like this: Bitmap original = ... Bitmap scaled = new Bitmap(new Size(original.Width * 4, original.Height * 4)); using (Graphics graphics = Graphics.FromImage(scaled)) { ...


14

Keep in mind that there's always a trade between speed and image quality when discussing scaling algorithms, and the ideal solution for your case might require some research and testing. Nearest neighbor is the simplest and fastest implementation of image scaling. There's a nice intro on image scale/resize on Coding Horror which reviews a couple of ...


13

private void CompressAndSaveImage(Image img, string fileName, long quality) { EncoderParameters parameters = new EncoderParameters(1); parameters.Param[0] = new EncoderParameter(Encoder.Quality, quality); img.Save(fileName, GetCodecInfo("image/jpeg"), parameters); } private static ImageCodecInfo GetCodecInfo(string mimeType) { ...


12

The Graphics object has a method to draw an Image while also performing a resize operation: Graphics.drawImage(Image, int, int, int, int, ImageObserver) method can be used to specify the location along with the size of the image when drawing. So, we could use a piece of code like this: BufferedImage otherImage = // .. created somehow BufferedImage ...


11

There are many ways to scale and rotate images. The simplest way to scale is: dest[dx,dy] = src[dx*src_width/dest_width,dy*src_height/dest_height] but this produces blocky effects when increasing the size and loss of detail when reducing the size. There are ways to produce better looking results, for example, bilinear filtering. For rotating, the src ...


11

How about using mogrify, part of ImageMagick? If you really need to control this from Perl, then you could use Image::Magick, Image::Resize or Imager.


11

If we want to do the same in UIbinder. From an external resource then : For example we have in recource @Source("images/logo.png") ImageResource getLogo(); In UiBinder template declare the <ui:with> element: <ui:with field='res' type='com.myapp.client.Resources'/> and below: <g:Image url='{res.getLogo.getSafeUri.asString}' ...


10

Tested libraries like Imagemagick and GD are available for .NET You could also read up on things like bicubic interpolation and write your own.


10

You can do this pretty simply using the EncodedImage.scaleImage32() method. You'll need to provide it with the factors by which you want to scale the width and height (as a Fixed32). Here's some sample code which determines the scale factor for the width and height by dividing the original image size by the desired size, using RIM's Fixed32 class. public ...


9

Depends on the data format. However, if you're using something like JPEG, GIF, PNG, or BMP you can use the ImageIO class. Something like: public byte[] scale(byte[] fileData, int width, int height) { ByteArrayInputStream in = new ByteArrayInputStream(fileData); try { BufferedImage img = ImageIO.read(in); if(height == 0) { ...



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