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3

There are two attributes to a thread-safe operation Visibility Atomicity To have a completely thread-safe operation it needs to satisfy both requirements. In your example it is safe of any data races (ie Visibility) (1) but is not atomic (2). Chances are, the author wanted to illustrate that the code above is safe for publication and neglected to point ...


1

It is thread-safe in the sense that the cached value is visible to other threads only when the OneValueCache is in valid state. The immutable class guarantees that all values are valid because the class must be instantiated every time when the values change (i.e. you cannot update already published instance by changing the fields one by one). However, this ...


3

So, two threads compute factors (one for 67, and the other for 89), and then store their result into the cache variable. The last thread that sets the variable wins. Let's say the first thread is the last one to store its factors in the cache. The cache thus contains the factors for 67. If a subsequent execution asks for the factors of 67, it will get them ...


0

You can also not use non final vals in (java) annotations: @GameRegistry.ObjectHolder(Reference.MOD_ID) object ModItems{ } will only compile if MOD_ID is declared as final


4

In Scala, final declares that a member may not be overridden in subclasses. For example: class Parent { val a = 1 final val b = 2 } class Subclass extends Parent { override val a = 3 // this line will compile override val b = 4 // this line will not compile } Also, as discussed in Why are `private val` and `private final val` different?, if a ...


5

final members cannot be overridden, say, in a sub-class or trait. Legal: class A { val a = 1 } class B extends A { override val a = 2 } Illegal: class A { final val a = 1 } class B extends A { override val a = 2 } You'll get an error such as this: :9: error: overriding value a in class A of type Int(1); value a cannot ...


0

While it's true that Collections.unmodifiableList() works, sometimes you may have a large library having methods already defined to return arrays (e.g. String[]). To prevent breaking them, you can actually define auxiliary arrays that will store the values: public class Test { private final String[] original; private final String[] auxiliary; ...


4

The Remove method has to scan the entire list to find the element to remove. The removal itself is O(1) because only the last element needs to be popped off. Both algorithms have quadratic performance. Why the enormous difference in run time? Probably, because ImmutableList is a tree structure internally. This means that to scan the list there are high ...


0

In smalltalk you would normally test for immutability by asking the mutators for their senders and then verifying that only the class method that creates the instances refers to it. So for instance: testOnlyOneMutatorOfPrivateColor self assert: (SystemNavigation default allSendersOf: #privateColor:) size = 1


2

A &mut pointer has to be unaliased, that is, there can be no other reference/pointer/path by which you can read/write the data if you want to mutate via an &mut. When you call self.foos.get_mut(i), get_mut acts like a black-box to the compiler, it can't tell what data is being borrowed, so it has to assume that the whole Vec is borrowed, due to the ...


2

Look at the signature of Vec::get_mut: fn get_mut<T>(&'a mut self, index: uint) -> &'a mut T That is, accessing even a single element mutably this way requires a &mut to the vector for as long as you keep the element reference. Because &mut may not alias (i.e. at all times there must only be a single &mut that reaches any ...


-2

EDIT: well, I try to say it again (english is not my native language) - with example. Some functions - I call them fun(object) - can use object.__func__() to do the job or they use other functions in object if there is no object.__func__() - For example str() - when you use str(object) it calls object.__str__(), but if there is no object.__str__() then ...


7

According to the spec: reversed(seq) Return a reverse iterator. seq must be an object which has a reversed() method or supports the sequence protocol (the __len__() method and the __getitem__() method with integer arguments starting at 0).


2

Strings with the same value can refer to the same interned string object. If you could change an interned string, the change would be reflected everywhere that interned string was used. Something like: string foo = "bats"; string bar = "bats"; foo[0] = 'c'; Console.WriteLine(bar); // cats Of course, they could be un-interned on write, but why bother? To ...


5

If String were a mutable type, it simply couldn't be interned. There's no point in keeping a pool of objects if they can be mutated... you wouldn't be able to rely on what you got out of the pool being the string you were interested in (at least by the time you used it). Imagine: string x = "foo"; string y = "foo"; // x and y are references to the same ...


2

Add a constructor that takes a name arg. The no-arg constructor needs to exist for Hibernate, but it doesn't need to be public. Force calling code to use the constructor with name arg. Or use a static Builder class which would be able to directly set private field; but that seems like overkill in this case.


2

Is there any simple way to do it? With a plain array, no. Arrays will always be mutable, so if you want this functionality you'll have to wrap an array and provide a mechanism for reading it (and not one for writing to it). There are already utilities in the standard JDK classes that can do this for you, like in Collections as you state. You can, for ...


1

If you declare: final int[] myarray = new int[5]; it will not make your array immutable as you expect. The reference myarray will be final, but contents of this array can be changed. As you do not want to use Collections Framework, make your own wrapper class over your array, to prevent modifying it's contents. And it will make your array immutable.


2

You're confusing class variables with instance variables (which is easy to do since in the absence of an initialized instance variable, the lookup finds the class variable). In this case, you have explicitly said that default_sth is a class variable, when you mean to have a default value for an instance variable. Use this instead: class BaseClass(object): ...


1

I think the problem with using a tuple instead of list is that usually people are choosing to use a list because they actually want list semantics; you can't append to a tuple, sort it in place, remove items from it, etc. If you want your class-level list attribute to not be shared with sub-classes, the sub-class can just make its own copy: from copy import ...


0

Mutable default variables are well-known fart in otherwise so beautiful Python. E.g. http://eli.thegreenplace.net/2009/01/16/python-insight-beware-of-mutable-default-values-for-arguments/ "Least Astonishment" in Python: The Mutable Default Argument http://pythonconquerstheuniverse.wordpress.com/2012/02/15/mutable-default-arguments/ Solutions ...


2

ImmutableSetMultimap has a builder: ImmutableSetMulitimap.Builder<Key, Value> builder = ImmutableSetMulitimap.builder(); for (Entry<Key, Value> entry : entries) { builder.put(entry.getKey(), entry.getValue()); } ImmutableSetMulitimap<Key, Value> map = builder.build(); For more info please see the javadoc


1

I think you're confused about how tuples actually work. Even 'real' tuples don't make the contained objects immutable, just the tuple itself: >>> x = [1,2,3] >>> t = (x,0,3) >>> t[0].append(4) >>> t ([1, 2, 3, 4], 0, 3) What I guess you want to do is .copy() the list before you start mutating it. >>> a = ...


3

Note that you're effectively describing conflicting requirements - an enum provides type-safe singletons; you cannot have multiple instances of the same enum value. Are you perhaps looking for the behavior EnumMap provides, the ability to map enums to different values? You could then have each thread or class hold its own mapping. This way the enums stay ...


1

You may look into the use of an AtomicInteger instead of using an enum or a mutable object to wrap a value: class MyWrapper { AtomicInteger aInt = new AtomicInteger(0); } within threads, you can use the following, thread-safely: { MyWrapper.aInt.set(12); MyWrapper.aInt.addAndGet(1); // ... } As all AtomicInteger objects are mutable, ...


1

This part of your question: This method stores it inside the object, in a NSDictionary property, so the type of the object becomes in fact NSDictionary. ... is false. No type conversion occurs. The object remains an NSMutableDictionary, it's just no longer explicit from the interface that it is so. Objective-C objects are untyped at runtime. Typing ...


0

Okasaki demonstrates that it is often possible to develop immutable data structures "with equivalent asymptotic performance" as their imperative counterparts. Likely the immutables structures have worse constants, however. But what you may pay for in performance you do get back in programmer time; as you said, it is much easier to work with and understand ...


2

Rather than using a void SetList(List) called from constructors, you could have a List PrepareList(List). This method would prepare the list, and return it to the callers -ie: the constructors. So the code wouldn't be repeated -except an affectation _list = PrepareList(list) in each constructors.


0

You can keep it as a normal list inside your class, but only expose it as readonly to the outside (just return .AsReadOnly() in a property). Though if you definetely want the internal immutability, constructors can call each other: public Foo( int a ) { ... } public Foo( string a ) : this( int.Parse( a ) ) { ... } So you can have most of the code in one ...


1

Under the covers, every byte in memory is "mutable". An array (in, say, Objective-C) is immutable because some sort of flag or type indicator in it says it's immmutable. There are basically 3 reasons for having an object be immutable: Security/robustness -- An object can be passed to an interface with confidence on both sides that the object will not be ...


0

String is immutable meant that the content of the String Object can't be changeable if you want to modify the content use StringBuffer instead of String which is mutable


5

Making the constructor private and using the builder pattern are not necessary for immutability. However because your class can't provide setters and if it has many fields, using a constructor with many parameters can be detrimental to readability hence the idea to use the builder pattern (which needs a pervade constructor). They other answers seem to have ...


8

Make constructor private and provide createInstance method with the same attributes as constructor or factory method ? How does it helps ? Answer: making the constructor private and providing a createInstance (factory) does not help by itself: it is one of few things you should do in order to allow users to actually use the class and its instances while ...


9

I'd start from making attributes final. Making attribute final guarantees that you cannot change the attribute value. I think this is obvious. (I will write additional comment to changing the content of references immutable objects later). Now, when all your attributes are final they must be initiated via constructor. However some classes have a lot of ...


8

Clojure's PersistentVector's have special tail buffer to enable efficient operation at the end of the vector. Only after this 32-element array is filled is it added to the rest of the tree. This keeps the amortized cost low. Here is one article on the implementation. The source is also worth a read. Regarding, "is it somehow possible to build a vector ...


5

Cannot tell about Clojure, but I can give some comments about Scala Vectors. Persistent Scala vectors (scala.collection.immutable.Vectors) are much slower than an array buffer when it comes to appending. In fact, they are 10x slower than the List prepend operation. They are 2x slower than appending to Conc-trees, which we use in Parallel Collections. But, ...


0

There is nothing to teach. Class instances are always mutable regardless of whether you say var or let. Collections are structs; the rules you're describing are for structs, which are a different animal. They are almost classes in Swift, but not quite; you've put your finger on a key difference. Any struct you make will behave the same way: it will be ...


0

You can use reflection in order to initialize all the fields of the object and laziness to make "setter" like methods (using monadic functional style) in order to chain the set methods/functions together. For example: You can use this base class: public class ImmutableObject<T> { private readonly Func<IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, ...


1

For the sake of having my code on SO rather than Pastebin, here's my observation. This looks like some kind of bug or unexpected behaviour when using an optional array in a Swift class derived from an Objective C class. If you use a plain Swift class, this works as expected: class Foo { var weekSelections: Array<Bool>! func test() { ...


1

If you want to work with Array (swift) as with NSArray, you can use simple bridge function, example : var arr1 : Array = [] arr1.bridgeToObjectiveC().count Works same for let.


0

Not an explanation, but a workaround. The issue isn't with the count:repeatedValue initializer, but rather with the array being assigned to an optional variable. From what I can tell optional arrays can only use accessor methods and not mutator methods--effectively they're immutable. Temporarily assigning _weekSelections to a non-optional variable before ...


2

I recommend you take a look at Guava's immutable collections, such as immutable list and how they create lists from builders etc. The idiom is the following: List<String> list1 = ImmutableList.of("a","b","c"); // factory method List<String> list2 = ImmutableList.builder() // builder pattern .add("a") .add("b") .add("c") .build(); ...


0

Depends on how many fields you intend to change. You could make special Changed objects like: interface Person { public String getForeName(); public String getSurName(); } class RealPerson implements Person { private final String foreName; private final String surName; public RealPerson (String foreName, String surName) { ...


0

Your problem boils down to this: You want a method that safely publishes an effectively immutable, almost-but-not-quite-faithful copy of an effectively immutable object. I'd go with the builder solution: It's verbose as all get out, but Eclipse helps with that, and it allows all of the published objects to be actually immutable. Actual immutability makes ...


1

Why not make your fields final and your modifier methods directly create new objects? public class Person { private final String name, surname; public Person(String name, String surname) {....} // getters... // and instead of setters public Person withName(String newName) { return new Person(newName, surname); } } ...


1

One possibility is to separate your interfaces surrounding such objects into an immutable variant (providing getters) and a mutable variant (providing getters and setters). public interface Person { String getName(); } public interface MutablePerson extends Person { void setName(String name); } It doesn't solve the mutability of the object per se ...


1

You have to take into account the dramatic difference between languages. Some time ago I've wrote a blog post with thoughts about immutability. I think that if you want to follow test's for another language, you should try to find some for python or ruby, because they are also dynamic languages. If you want to maintain immutability, I suggest you going the ...


2

readonly When a field declaration includes a readonly modifier, assignments to the fields introduced by the declaration can only occur as part of the declaration or in a constructor in the same class. There's no equivalent for local variables. You'll have to make it a field.



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