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19

You're confusing impredicative types with existential types. Impredicative types allow you to put polymorphic values in a data structure, not arbitrary concrete ones. In other words [forall a. Num a => a] means that you have a list where each element works as any numeric type, so you can't put e.g. Int and Double in a list of type [forall a. Num a => a]...


10

It would be helpful if you could elaborate on exactly what you'd like to achieve. Some impredicative uses (such as this example from the Haskell wiki) are relatively easy to encode using an additional nominal type with a single generic method: type IForallList = abstract Apply : 'a list -> 'a list let f = function | Some(g : IForallList) -> Some(...


8

(Nothing in your question uses existential types. What you have is a constructor Approximate that has a polymorphic argument, resulting in Approximate having a rank-2 type and leading to issues with higher-rank types and type inference.) The short answer is: Point-free style and higher-rank types don't go well together. Avoid the use of function composition ...


8

why is it expecting a type of (forall a. a -> a) -> b -> b I think the type forall b.(forall a. a -> a) -> b -> b is equivalent to the type you gave. It is just a canonical representation of it, where the forall is shifted as much to the left as possible. And the reason why it does not work is that the given type is actually more ...


6

Here's an example of how one project, const-math-ghc-plugin, uses ImpredicativeTypes to specify a list of matching rules. The idea is that when we have an expression of the form App (PrimOp nameStr) (Lit litVal), we want to look up the appropriate rule based upon the primop name. A litVal will be either a MachFloat d or MachDouble d (d is a Rational). If ...


6

Isn't it just that ImpredicativeTypes has been quietly dropped with the new typechecker in ghc-7+ ? Note that ideone.com still uses ghc-6.8 and indeed your program use to run fine : {-# OPTIONS -fglasgow-exts #-} f :: Maybe (forall a. [a] -> [a]) -> Maybe ([Int], [Char]) f (Just g) = Just (g [3], g "hello") f Nothing = Nothing main = print $ f (...


5

Note this workaround: justForF :: (forall a. [a] -> [a]) -> Maybe (forall a. [a] -> [a]) justForF = Just ghci> f (justForF reverse) Just ([3],"olleh") Or this one (which is basically the same thing inlined): ghci> f $ (Just :: (forall a. [a] -> [a]) -> Maybe (forall a. [a] -> [a])) reverse Just ([3],"olleh") Seems like the type ...


4

The problem is that your type synonym is a polymorphic type type s :~> s' = forall r. s -> (s' -> r) -> r Using a polymorphic type as an argument to a type constructor other than -> is called "impredicativity". For instance, the following would be an impredicative use Maybe (forall a. a -> a) For various reasons, type inference with ...


4

I can't say I understand the problem statement completely yet, but the following file compiles without error under GHC 7.6.2. It has the same body as your first example (and in particular doesn't call unsafePerformIO at all); the primary difference is that the forall is moved outside of all type constructors. {-# LANGUAGE RankNTypes #-} import Control.Monad ...


3

Your :~> type is not what you actually want (hence the ImpredicativeTypes). If you just remove type annotation from call then your last sample will work as expected. Another way to make it work is to use less fancy but more appropriate type with extra parameter: type Tran s s' r = s -> (s' -> r) -> r call :: Tran (s :> (Tran s s' r)) s' r ...


3

(This should probably be a comment, but I need more space.) Sadly, impredicative types do not work very well in GHC, as @dfeuer pointed out. Consider this example: {-# LANGUAGE ImpredicativeTypes, PartialTypeSignatures #-} import qualified Data.Vector.Mutable as MV import Control.Monad.ST -- myIndex :: [forall s. MV.MVector s Int -> ST s ()] -- ...


3

Note: This post is written in literate Haskell. You can save it as Unsafe.lhs and try it in your GHCi. Let's compare the types of the different lines: mods :: [(forall s . MV.MVector s Int -> ST s ())] (mods !! 0) :: (forall s . MV.MVector s Int -> ST s ()) (mods !! 0) mvec :: forall s. ST s () ($ mvec) ...


2

You are absolutely correct that forall b. (forall a. a -> a) -> b -> b is not equivalent to (forall a. a -> a) -> (forall b. b -> b). Unless annotated otherwise, type variables are quantified at the outermost level. So (a -> a) -> b -> b is shorthand for (forall a. (forall b. (a -> a) -> b -> b)). In System F, where type ...


2

ImpredicativeTypes leaves you on quite shaky ground that changes from GHC version to version in any case - they're struggling to find a formulation of impredicativity that appropriately balances power, ease of use and ease of implementation. In this particular case, trying to put a quantified type inside a Maybe, which is a datatype not explicitly defined ...


1

You shouldn't be able to define pop on the empty tuple, but the rest is smooth enough if we use a type class to represent cases on the type of the stack. class Stack h where push :: a -> h x -> h (a, x) pop :: h (a, x) -> (h x, a) top :: h (a, x) -> (h (a, x), a) top hax = let (_, a) = pop hax in (hax, a) newtype S x = S x instance ...


1

Do you need to have it untyped? If you're willing to use advanced GHC features, you can do something like this: {-# LANGUAGE GADTs, DataKinds, KindSignatures, TypeOperators #-} {-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances, FlexibleContexts #-} module Stack (Stack(..), push, pop, top, empty) where data Stack (h :: [*]) where Empty :: Stack '[] Push :: x -> ...



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