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6

Suppose you have a matrix M whose (i,j)-th element equals M_ij = 2*i + 3*j One way to define this matrix would be i, j = np.indices((2,3)) M = 2*i + 3*j which yields array([[0, 3, 6], [2, 5, 8]]) In other words, np.indices returns arrays which can be used as indices. The elements in i indicate the row index: In [12]: i Out[12]: array([[0, ...


1

I would try to rewrite this query to something like this (this is only proof of concept using CTE): declare @categoryid int = 2; with products_a as ( select [scanresultebay].productebayid from [scanresultebay] inner join [productebay] on [productebay].id = [scanresultebay].productebayid ...


1

This is not a full answer, but an answer to your question in the comments about the exists syntax. instead of: WHERE [Scanresultebay].productebayid in ( SELECT [Scanresultebay].productebayid FROM [Scanresultebay] INNER JOIN [ProductEbay] ON [ProductEbay].id = [ScanResultEbay].ProductEbayId INNER JOIN ...


0

You should create indexes for each foreign key. If your where clause includes multiple fields for a single table then you should create indexes on these combinations also. edit: To elaborate: Indexes are global. Not query specific. 100 categories is extremely small. You have a lot of joins (all are necessary) Create the indexes it will improve ...


8

short answer: A(find(diff(A)<0,1)+1:end) = [] longer answer with explanation: diff calculates the difference between adjacent elements: >> diff(A) ans = 10 10 10 10 -5 -1 6 10 We then search the first index of those differences that is less than zero and remove this and all succeeding elements. >>> idx = ...


2

You can use a bsxfun based solution for all those three cases - ii = 1:4 row = reshape(bsxfun(@(A,B) 4 * (B-1) + A,ii,n'),1,[]) %//' col = reshape(bsxfun(@(A,B) 4 * (B-1) + A,ii,m'),1,[]) %//' The inputs would be as listed next. Case #1: m = [2, 3, 4] n = ones(1,numel(m)) Case #2: n = 2 m = 1 Case #3: n = 3 m = 5


1

I would create a Matrix with all parameters, then apply the math once: M=[...n m i ones(3,1) (2:4).' (1:3).';... 2*ones(4,1) ones(4,1) (1:4).';... 3*ones(4,1) 5*ones(4,1) (1:4).';... ]; row = (4 * (M(:,1) - 1) + M(:,3)).'; col = (4 * (M(:,2) - 1) + M(:,3)).'; %alternative: %index=(4 * (M(:,[1:2]) - 1) + ...


2

I am adding this as a second answer since it is in a different language (now C) and has a more direct approach. I am keeping the original answer since the following code is almost inexplicable without it. I combined my two functions into a single one to cut down on function call overhead. Also, to be 100% sure that it answers the original question, I used ...


1

I found it easier to find i,j from the index in the following number pattern: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Since the indices going down the left are the triangular numbers of the form k*(k+1)/2. By solving an appropriate quadratic equation I was able to recover the row and the column from the index. But -- your loops give something like this: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...


1

In this particular case we have index = N+(N-1)+...+(N-i+1) + (j+1) = i(2N-i+1)/2 + (j+1) = -i^i/2 + (2N-1)i/2 + (j+1) with j in the interval [1,N-i]. We neglect j and regard this as a quadratic equation in i. Thus we solve -i^i/2 + (2N-1)i/2 + (1-index) = 0. We approximate i to be the greatest out of the two resulting solutions (or the ceil of this ...


2

Using matrix-multiplication based euclidean distance calculations - Bt = B.'; %//' [m,n] = size(A); dists = [A.^2 ones(size(A)) -2*A ]*[ones(size(Bt)) ; Bt.^2 ; Bt]; C = B(any(dists==0,1),:);


2

Here's an alternative using bsxfun: C = B(all(any(bsxfun(@eq, B, permute(A, [3 2 1])),3),2),:); Or you could use pdist2 (Statistics Toolbox): B(any(~pdist2(A,B),1),:);


0

I think going with reset_index() is the way, but there is an option to drop the index, not push it back into the dataframe. Like this: s1 = pd.Series([1,2,3,4,5,6,7], index=[52,34,3,53,636,7,4]) 52 1 34 2 3 3 53 4 636 5 7 6 4 7 dtype: int64 s1.reset_index(drop=True) 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 7 dtype: ...


2

You're pretty close. You just need to swap B and A, then use this output to index into B: L = ismember(B, A, 'rows'); C = B(L,:); How ismember works in this particular case is that it outputs a logical vector that has the same number of rows as B where the ith value in B tells you whether we have found this ith row somewhere in A (logical 1) or if we ...



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