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13

In this case I would interpret "inductively" as "induction over the number of iterations". To do this we first establish a so called loop-invariant. In this case the loop invariant is:              count stores the number of numbers divisible by k with index lower than i. This invariant ...


11

The machine-checked version of pad's proof in Agda: module fibs where open import Data.Nat open import Relation.Binary.PropositionalEquality fib : ℕ → ℕ fib 0 = 0 fib 1 = 1 fib (suc (suc n)) = fib n + fib (suc n) f : ℕ → ℕ → ℕ → ℕ f 0 a b = a f (suc n) a b = f n b (a + b) fib' : ℕ → ℕ fib' n = f n 0 1 -- Exactly the theorem the user `pad` proposed: ...


10

I couldn't access to the above mentioned paper, but their generalized theorem is a good way to go. Two values 0 and 1 in f n 0 1 sound like magic numbers; however if you generalize them to Fibonacci numbers, a proof is much easier to be conducted. To avoid confusion when reading the proof, fib k is written as F(k) and some unnecessary parentheses are also ...


10

This is how I open the sqlite3 Method 1: Fill in the first box file://path/to/file/db.sqlite3, select file adapter, fill in the Database column with: Path/to/yourdb.sqlite3 Method 2: You can drag-and-dropping the sqlite3 file on the app icon.


9

Break the problem down into its execution steps. fact(5) | 5 * fact(4) || 5 * (4 * fact(3)) ||| 5 * (4 * (3 * fact(2)) |||| 5 * (4 * (3 * (2 * fact(1)))) ||||| 5 * (4 * (3 * (2 * (1 * fact(0))))) |||||| 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 * 1 120 Your function simply calls itself, just as any other function can call it. In this case however, your function needs a stopping ...


6

Compare the "proof" that linear search is O(1). Linear search on an empty array is O(1). Linear search on a nonempty array compares the first element (O(1)) and then searches the rest of the array (O(1)). O(1) + O(1) = O(1). The problem here is that, for the induction to work, there must be one big-O constant that works both for the hypothesis and the ...


6

There is a trick you can do here: you can manually inline and fuse the definitions of map and sum inside a mutual block. It's pretty anti-modular, but it's the simplest method I'm aware of. Some other total languages (Coq) can sometimes do this automatically. mutual size : Tree → ℕ size leaf = 1 size (branch ts) = suc (sizeBranch ts) sizeBranch : ...


5

In substitution method, simply replace any occurance of T(k) by T(k-1) + k, and do it iteratively. T(n) = T(n-1) + n = = (T(n-2) + (n-1)) + n = = T(n-3) + (n-2) + (n-1) + n = = ... = = 1 + 2 + ... + n-1 + n From sum of arithmetic progression, you can get that T(n) is in O(n^2). Note that substitution method is usually used to get an intuition on ...


5

Recursion and induction are very much the same thing! This becomes obvious if you use a programming language with dependent types, such as Agda, but it can be demonstrated to some extent without them too. Remember, that due to the Curry-Howard correspondence, types are propositions and programs are proofs. When you are writing a function of type Nat -> ...


5

I'm not sure which expressions you need to prove the algorithm against. But if they look like typical RPN expressions, you'll need to establish something like the following: 1) algoritm works for 2 operands (and one operator) and algorithm works for 3 operands (and 2 operators) ==> that would be your base case 2) if algorithm works for n operands ...


5

I believe your proof would be easier to recognize with Strong Induction: ... in the second step we may assume not only that the statement holds for n = m but also that it is true for all n less than or equal to m. You were getting stuck here: fib' (k+1) = fib (k+1) f (k+1) 0 1 = fib k + fib (k-1) .. in part because you need to have both the steps ...


4

The "proof" only covers a single pass, it doesn't cover the log n number of passes. The recurrence only shows the cost of a pass as compared to the cost of the previous pass. To be correct, the recurrence relation should have the cumulative cost rather than the incremental cost. You can see where the proof falls down by viewing the sample merge sort ...


4

If the paper says it is equivalent to Lemma: f n (fib p) (fib (p+1)) = fib (p+n) we should start by proving that. The key here is use generalized induction, that is, keep track of your forall quantifiers. First we show forall p, f 0 (fib p) (fib (p+1)) = fib p = fib (p + 0) Now, we assume the inductive hypothesis forall p, f n (fib p) (fib (p+1)) = ...


4

If you're on mac you should take a look at both of the following applications: Postgres app - For installing and running postgres Induction app - For exploring data and navigating Both should be more straightforward than other options.


4

The claim n^2logn is in O(n^2) means intuitively that n^2logn grows at most as fast as n^2 -asymptotically (this claim is wrong). By definition, that means there is some constants c,N such that for each n>N: c*n^2logn <= n^2 Disproving it is very simple by contradiction. Assume (falsely) the claim is true, and let N,c be our constants: c*n^2logn ...


3

Keep in mind that each invocation of fact(), whether invoked externally or invoked by itself, gets its own distinct set of local variables. fact1 has n of 5 fact2 has n of 4 fact3 has n of 3 fact4 has n of 2 fact5 has n on 1 fact6 has n of 0 The deepest ones (EG fact6 is deepest) are computed completely ...


3

It is sometimes a good idea to not start out too formal. I think as soon as you see that the tail recursive version simply passes F(n-2) and F(n-1) around to avoid recalculation in each step, this gives you a proof idea, which you then formalize.


3

You've asked a lot of questions here, so hopefully this reply answers all of them. If there's something you'd like clarified, please let me know. Your first question - why do we need inductive definitions? - is easiest to answer. In computer science, a huge number of structures are defined inductively. For example, your simple linked list has the ...


3

I suggest you try to treat two moves as one. (I.e. that the 30 stones are removed in 15 moves.) This would allow you to show that the property of having an odd or even number of black stones is invariant throughout the game. A proof sketch follows: Base cases: Two stones left. Odd number of blacks. Both stones can be removed in one double-move: b w ...


3

Here is the crux: all induction steps which refer to particular values of n must refer to a particular function T(n), not to O() notation! O(M(n)) notation is a statement about the behavior of the whole function from problem size to performance guarantee (asymptotically, as n increases without limit). The goal of your induction is to determine a ...


3

First verify it holds for n = 1. Then assume it is true for n = x ( the sum of the first x squares ) and then try to compute the sum of the the first x + 1 squares. You know the result for the first x, you just add the last square to that sum. From there it should be easy. And you posted on the wrong site.


3

I'm not entirely convinced that induction is necessary here. Here's my two cents: Suppose you have a sequence of numbers S, and integer k, and you already know that there exists a subset of numbers whose sum is k. Now, remove a number from your sequence (call it i), and use your black box on what remains (using the same k as before). If the algorithm ...


3

It depends on what you mean by "it works for n+2". If you mean that there is some statement S(n), and you can prove If S(n) is True then S(n+2) is True And if you know S(0) is True, then by induction, it follows that S(2), S(4), S(6), ..., S(n) for all even n is True. And if also you know S(1) is True, then by a second application of induction, it ...


3

I don't understand what the induction tactic is doing here. Whenever I don't understand what a tactic is doing, I try to just write the proof term myself. If you invoke the induction principle by hand, you can keep the original hypothesis: Theorem ev__even : forall n, ev n -> even n. intros n E. refine (ev_ind even _ _ n E). - reflexivity. - ...


3

To be useful, the induction tactic tries to generalize over all variables that depend on the thing you are doing induction on, and things that depend on the indices of its type. In your case, this implies generalizing over n, the newly generated proof e : ev n, and the equality e = E. However, it does not generalize over E itself, because the induction ...


2

We prove correctness by induction on n, the number of elements in the array. Your range is wrong, it should either be 0 to n-1 or 1 to n, but not 0 to n. We'll assume 1 to n. In the case of n=0 (base case), we simply go through the algorithm manually. The counter is initiated with value 0, the loop doesn't iterate, and we return the value of counter, which ...


2

There is no systematic approach other than "use your brain". But you are lucky, because these two example are indeed very close to the original example: 1. A natural number k is in S if either a) k = 1 or b) k-2 ∈ S or c) k-3 ∈ S 1. a) 0 ∈ S b) If n ∈ S, then n+2 ∈ S c) If n ∈ S, then n+3 ∈ S 2. A pair of natural numbers (k,l) is in S if either a) k=0 ...


2

lets walk through the execution. fact(5): 5 is not 0, so fact(5) = 5 * fact(4) what is fact(4)? fact(4): 4 is not 0, so fact(4) = 4 * fact(3) what is fact(3)? fact(3): 3 is not 0, so fact(3) = 3 * fact(2) what is fact(2)? fact(2): 2 is not 0, so fact(2) = 2 * fact(1) what is fact(1)? fact(1): 1 is not 0, so fact(1) = 1 * fact(0) ...


2

A recursive function is one that calls itself and continues to do so until evaluation is finished and a result is produced. The key with the factorial function you have above is the return x * fact(x-1) So if you input 5 it will execute 5 * fact(5-1) * fact 4-1) .... And so on until it hits 0 and then returns 1. So you will have 5*4*3*2*1 which is 120. It ...



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