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63

What are common symptoms of over-engineering? Code that solves problems you don't have.


60

Security. Your web server lives in a DMZ, accessible to the public internet and taking untrusted input from anonymous users. If your web server gets compromised, and you've followed least privilege rules in connecting to your DB, the maximum exposure is what your app can do through the database API. If you have a business tier in between, you have one more ...


23

Try putting App_Offline.htm to the root directory.


22

I'd share the load between the 4 servers. It's not that many. You don't want that single point of contention either when deploying nor that single point of failure in production. When deploying, you can do them 1 at a time. Your deployment tools should automate this by notifying the load balancer that the server shouldn't be used, deploying the code, any ...


16

On the other hand, referring to a different blogging Scott (Watermasyck, of Telligent) - they found that most users could speed up the websites (using Telligent's Community Server), by putting the database on the same machine as the web site. However, in their customer's case, usually the db & web server are the only applications on that machine, and ...


14

Vagrant should be used more like a staging environment to test your infrastructure changes. It should be your test bed for automated infrastructure changes. The way we use it at my company is like so: Create VMs for our managed servers in Vagrant. Create puppet definitions for each server. Create cucumber tests for each server. Make infrastructure ...


13

I would think the big factor would be performance. Both the web server/app code and SQL Server would cache commonly requested data in memory and you're killing your cache performance by running them in the same memory space.


13

It doesn't really matter (you can quite happily run your site with web/database on the same machine), it's just the easiest step in scaling.. It's exactly what StackOverflow did - starting with single machine running IIS/SQL Server, then when it started getting heavily loaded, a second server was bought and the SQL server was moved onto that. If ...


12

Short Answer In short, they have developed a webcrawler designed to very efficiently crawl the web from a many computer environment (but which can also be run on a single computer). You can start crawling the web without actually needing to know how they implemented it. The page you reference describes how it is implemented. Technology behind it They ...


10

Set yourself up to pass the Joel Test with at least a score of 10.


10

As for the question about if you an architecture astronaut: If you are aware of the danger that puts you ahead of a lot of people. You don't want to go the way of your cow-orkers either, it sounds like some of them have become crusty old whiners. Over-engineering is the result of a problem with prioritization that resulted in some part of the system getting ...


10

Boredom Boredom is good precursor to over-engineered code. I'll admit, when I got my first job, I felt so underutilized. I was just bored. And when I got bored, I wrote code. Not just any code -- CATHEDRALS OF CODE. No seriously, I had a mental picture of my code and abstractions as large towers with golden jutting spires, flying buttresses of glassy onyx, ...


8

Tom is correct on this. Some other reasons are that it isn't cost effective and that there are additional security risks. Webservers have different hardware requirements than database servers. Database servers fare better with a lot of memory and a really fast disk array while web servers only require enough memory to cache files and frequent DB requests ...


8

See this question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/176775/big-integers-in-c From the answer to that question: MS is going to introduce System.Numerics.BigInteger class in .NET 4.0 Until then, look at IntX class. IntX is an arbitrary precision integers library written in pure C# 2.0 with fast - O(N * log N) - multiplication/division ...


8

For most in-house business applications, most of your code should be concerned with implementing business concerns, and not technical concerns unrelated to the business (like your "disconnected change tracking architecture"). The currently available frameworks are pretty mature and support most common use cases. If you're inventing new technology or (in the ...


7

If you reboot your servers occasionally, you can be sure they will come back up. Though weekly sounds like a serious overkill, I have seen this problem on Linux machines with long uptimes. Someone didn't bother to set up a critical service to start automatically on boot. Or the order of services coming up is wrong. Or someone upgraded libraries, ...


7

One factor that hasn't been mentioned yet is load balancing. If you start off thinking of the web server and the database as separate machines, you optimize for fewer network round trips and also it gets easier to add a second web server or a second database engine as needs increase.


7

One very strong warning sign of overengineering is when everything goes through so much indirection that it's hard to find the piece of code that actually implements some concrete, domain-level piece of functionality. If you find that most of your functions do very little concrete work and just call other virtual functions, you may have a problem.


6

Also, don't forget you need to have your server secured from current (that is, soon-to-be-past) employees. Several startups were totally wiped due to employee sabotage, e.g. http://www.geek.com/articles/news/disgruntled-employee-kills-journalspace-with-data-wipe-2009015/


6

If your main concern is performance, which I assume it is since you're spending all this money on hardware, then it doesn't really make sense to share a network filesystem just for convenience sake. Even if the network drives are extremely high performing, they won't perform as well as native drives. Deploying your web assets are automated anyway (right?) ...


6

Avoiding any use of YAGNI, DRY, and KISS come to mind in looking at things that are over-engineered. If there are many parts that seem to be partially completed and many parts of code that seem to have a, "What if this happens? What if that happens?" feel to it, that would be another point. Ignoring good principles of OO design or SOLID principles would ...


6

Writing your own Framework Odds are, someone's already done it. More than that, they've already done it 1000x better than you ever could. More than that, whatever they've done is probably already an industry standard, so that learning the technology will make you more competitive at other jobs. At the last company where I worked, a programmer had worked ...


6

There are several tests you could do to stress your system. I like to use apache bench to load test a page that writes to the database. I test it both for number of hits and concurrent users 500 concurrent users making a total of 5000 requests $ ab -n 5000 -c 500 url I know my webserver can stand up to this, but I found a problem with how I was ...


6

Those types of services are sufficiently context dependent to be unyielding to common frameworks above the facilities provided by the .NET Framework. There may frameworks centered around specific tasks, such as emailing, however you're better of selecting a solution that fits the requirements, instead of the converse. Instead, consider reviewing some sample ...


6

In terms of the C# compiler, you also need: AsyncTaskMethodBuilder AsyncTaskMethodBuilder<TResult> AsyncVoidMethodBuilder AsyncStateMachineAttribute Possibly ICriticalNotifyCompletion although I believe that' just used by the builder. I wouldn't expect that either TaskCreationOptions or CancellationToken would actually be required - I can't think ...


5

This is a foolish policy. Here's why: If you need to reboot a server weekly (and somehow it adds to your infrastructure's stability), you are covering up the real problem with a server or its software. A memory leak? A bad driver? The solution to these problems are to fix them, not cover them up with a lazy policy. Servers often get rebooted for ...


5

As a preliminary answer, check out the Joel test: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000043.html Just an appetizer: Do you use source control? Can you make a build in one step? Do you make daily builds? Do you have a bug database? Do you fix bugs before writing new code? Do you have an up-to-date schedule? Do you have a spec? ...


5

I think having the right people is going to be the most important. Nothing else will matter if your programmers stink.


5

If security isn't thought of and built into the application and its infrastructure from day one it will be much more difficult to retrofit it in later. Now is the time to build the processes for regular OS/tool patching, upgrades, etc. What kind of data will users be creating/storing on the site? What effect will a breach have on your users? What effect ...



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