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15

I think PickField should be parameterized with Pick instances only. So doing this should be fine: class PickField<T extends Pick<T>> extends Field<T> { public PickField(Class<T> c) { super(c); } } Then, you could just instantiate it with: PickField<SomeSpecificPick> instance = new ...


9

Explicit interface implementations always have to have an actual implementation. The trick here is to making that just call a non-explicit (internal) abstract method: public abstract class A_Foo : I_Foo { public A_Foo() { } void I_Foo.Bar() { Bar(); // Just delegate to the abstract method } internal abstract void Bar(); } ...


9

If your code is aware of concurrency and needs to call concurrent methods like putIfAbsent, the only choice is ConcurrentMap. If you will only use put/remove/get, it's better to choose Map.


9

There are numerous problems with the code given that other answers get into. I want to answer your specific question: Why will calling base.Cast<Turtle>() (or any LINQ method on the base element) in any method from the class Turtle fail to compile? Let's go to the specification, section 7.6.8. A base-access is used to access base class ...


8

Why do you need the boost::any? If you need to determine the difference between Interface1 and Interface2, and you have a std::shared_pointer stored in your map, then just store a std::shared_pointer<Interface1> and use std::dynamic_pointer_cast<Interface2> to determine whether you have an Interface1 or an Interface2 Example: #include ...


8

In the sub-class's print you just call super-class's print method. So it prints the a from the super class of course. You have two separate a fields here. Fields are not subject to overriding, only methods are. The super-class has an a field and you have another a field in the sub-class. If another language produces another result, that's not a big ...


8

It is the order of constructor calling in Java. In the SubClass, when you instantiate c, the constructor implicitly calls the default constructor of the SuperClass (public SuperClass()) (it must do so). Then a is set to be 10 in the SuperClass. Now that we're done with the SuperClass constructor, we get back to the constructor of SubClass, which assigns a ...


8

It is not possible to have them implicitly. You can explicitly have the constructors available via: class B: public A { using A::A; }; class C: public A { using A::A; };


8

You're not passing a byte to your instance of Vampire; you're passing an int with your loop. Because Monster accepts int, it is what is being called. Effectively, you're overloading your method, not overriding it - you have a method with the same name and two identical signatures. You really should use homogeneous types when overriding a method so you ...


7

Yes, it's name hiding. You should just add using declaration. template<typename T> class B: public A<T>{ public: using A<T>::someMethod; T& someMethod(T&,T&); };


7

There are various issues here. Firstly as you point out, you cannot obtain the class of a parametrized type at compile time, since only one class is compiled for generic types, not one per given type parameter (e.g. the Pick<String>.class idiom does not compile, and doesn't actually make sense). Again as you mention, parametrizing the ...


7

No, that is not possible. It is entirely up to the overriding method to call the superclass method, or not. However, there is a way to do it, if you want to enforce control. This is called the Template Method Pattern. Whether the template methods are abstract or stubs (like shown here), depends on whether they must do something, or simply allow something ...


6

Since your class A1 has non-virtual destructor, your delete a1 produces undefined behavior. It is illegal to apply delete to a pointer of type A1 * when the pointer actually points to a B1 object, unless class A1 has virtual destructor. What you observe is just a specific manifestation of undefined behavior. Declare A1's destructor as virtual and you ...


6

The other data is hidden. Do template <typename T_VALUE> struct B : public A<T_VALUE> { using A<T_VALUE>::data; // Add this line void data(Foo<T_VALUE>) { std::cout << "smart FOO impl\n"; } };


6

I'd prefer the explicit approach here: (defun actually-inc-a (value) (incf (x value))) (defun actually-inc-b (value) (incf (y value))) (defmethod inc ((object a)) (actually-inc-a object)) (defmethod inc ((object b)) (actually-inc-b object)) i.e., place the part of the implementation you want to share into a separate function. (defun ...


5

This is not possible from the definition of object model - static methods cannot be overriden in C# and any other object language as well. This is mentioned e.g. here as well (for Java, but this is general to object-oriented programming): Why cannot we override static method in the derived class Overriding depends the an instance of a class. ...


5

Yes. class Operation def reduce if left.reducible? self.class.new(left.reduce, right) elsif right.reducible? self.class.new(left, right.reduce) else Number.new(left.value + right.value) end end end


5

There is no method overriding for static methods. The static type of the instance being used to call the method (ParentClass in your example) determines which method is called. Besides that, it's bad practice to use an instance reference in order to call a static method. You should use ClassName.methodName() to execute a static method.


5

From the perspective of Test Nested is just an identifier as if it were a member e.g. As it is public You may access it everywhere where you cann access any of the classes Outer or SubOuter. However both usages are identical, they identify the same class. You may even reference the one by the other: Outer.Nested x = new Outer.Nested(); SubOuter.Nested y = ...


5

There are a few facts you ought to know before I start explaining every single step in your code's execution: Field references are resolved based on reference type and method calls are resolved during run-time (in a dynamic-fashion) based on the object type. super() is placed implicitly in every constructor even if you don't put it there yourself (it is ...


5

First of all, Building inheriting from Player does not make much sense, a is-a relationship between Building and Player seems weird and like a semantic error. Just don't inherit from Player, i.e.: class Building(object): # code for the class Now for your other question, if you want each Player to be able to aggregate multiple instances of Building ...


5

It's a bug. This is a bug. I've submitted a GCC bug report for this problem. It has now been fixed in GCC's trunk. Workaround As noted by Revolver_Ocelot, &* appears to force g++ to perform the correct type-deduction. My current workaround (which is inside a macro taking some pointer expression that might be this) is therefore to capture [ptr = ...


5

The answers and comments do not quite go down to the bottom of it, so I will try to address this. On the first look, using void* casts as shown should not be of a problem, because you end up casting to the base, right? So even if at some point the information of the type was lost through void*, it should be re-aquired? The virtual function calls should ...


5

This is a known gcc bug that was reported back in 2013 https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=59482 Your code is correct and should compile with newer versions of gcc (fixed on gcc4.9 and later). On my side (gcc5.3) it works just fine.


5

Eric Lippert has stated before that this was a somewhat conscious design decision here. You were never meant to use extension methods in a case where you have access to the implementation of your base class in the first place. And if you think about it, you also dont need to do this here. Make a GetEnumerator property or method that is protected and use it! ...


5

Change: def OutputPlane(SphericalRefraction): into: class OutputPlane(SphericalRefraction): an you should be good to go.


4

No. Virtual base classes must always be constructed by the most derived class. It cannot work any other way. All you can do is not permit A to be default constructible and have the compiler help you out, or refactor your code to not use diamond inheritance in the first place.


4

The parametrized type of your List is the problem here, as it is erased at runtime (see type erasure), hence defiling virtual method invocation. You can parametrize your method with List<? extends Actor> in the whole class hierarchy to work around this issue. Something in the lines of: class Actor { } class Animal extends Actor { } abstract ...


4

Your public Rettangolo(Punto p1, Punto p2) must call some constructor of the super class Poligono. The compiler complains that the only constructor available - Poligono(Punto[] vertici) - doesn't fit the parameters of the second Rettangolo constructor. You have to explicitly call the Poligono constructor with the super(..) call. Assuming that the two ...


4

Since the part type is a static information for a class type by design (am I right?), you could use an attribute to store it: [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)] public class PartTypeAttribute : Attribute { public readonly PartType PartType; public PartTypeAttribute(PartType partType) { PartType = partType; } } Then apply it ...



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