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143

If you need to make the difference between Car and Boat in your garage, then you should store them in distinct structures. For instance: public class Garage { private List<Car> cars; private List<Boat> boats; } Then you can define methods that are specific on boats or specific on cars. Why have polymorphism then? Let's say Vehicle ...


83

To answer your question you can find out what exactly is in your garage you do the following: Vehicle v = myGarage[0]; if (v instanceof Car) { // This vehicle is a car ((Car)v).doSomeCarStuff(); } else if(v instanceof Boat){ // This vehicle is a boat ((Boat)v).doSomeBoatStuff(); } UPDATE: As you can read from the comments below, this method ...


57

The only way to invoke an explicit interface member is to cast the object to the correct interface and then invoke the member on that interface. But once you've cast to IConnection, the IConnection.ConnectionString has no setter. So there's no way to invoke this private setter method.


41

It is possible that even though all the methods had a default implementations, these implementations weren't actually meaningful in the context of the application. The methods might only do internal bookkeeping while the actually useful implementation must be provided by a derived class which does what it needs to do and then calls the superclass method. ...


34

Java was a compromise between non-object languages and very slow languages of that time where everything was an object (think about Smalltalk). Even in more recent languages, having a fast structure at the language level for arrays (and usually maps) is considered a strategic goal. Most people wouldn't like the weight of an inheritable object for arrays, ...


33

It's more a stylistic thing than a direct problem. It suggests that you haven't properly thought through what is going on with the class. Think about what static means: This variable exists at class level, it does not exist separately for each instance and it does not have an independent existence in classes which extend me. Think about what protected ...


31

Unnamed classes can inherit. This is useful, for example, in situations when you must inherit in order to override a virtual function, but you never need more than one instance of the class, and you do not need to reference the derived type, because a reference to the base type is sufficient. Here is an example: #include <iostream> using namespace ...


31

Because your DefaultClass 'inherits' from object by default. You are overriding object.Equals now. I understand the confusion though. MSDN says that a class like that doesn't inherit any other class, but it does (object): Inheritance: None. Example: class ClassA { }


29

There no concept of abstract in swift (like objective C) but you can do this : class BaseClass { func abstractFunction() { fatalError("This method must be overridden") } } class SubClass : BaseClass { override func abstractFunction() { // Override } }


25

My answer is correct? Yes, mostly, and certainly in the context you describe. This is not multiple inheritance: It's what you said it is, single inheritance with multiple levels. This is multiple inheritance: Inheriting from two or more bases that don't have any "is a" relationship with each other; that would be inheriting from unrelated lines, or ...


25

As in JLS §12.5 (Creation of New Class Instances) the following procedure is used when an instance is created: Assign the arguments for the constructor to newly created parameter variables for this constructor invocation. If this constructor begins with an explicit constructor invocation (§8.8.7.1) of another constructor in the same class (using this), ...


24

From the Java Language Specification, A class C inherits from its direct superclass all concrete methods m (both static and instance) of the superclass for which all of the following are true: [...] A class C inherits from its direct superclass and direct superinterfaces all abstract and default (§9.4) methods m for which all of ...


21

The JVM specification states The Java Virtual Machine does not mandate any particular internal structure for objects. So the specification does not care how you do it. But... In some of Oracle’s implementations of the Java Virtual Machine, a reference to a class instance is a pointer to a handle that is itself a pair of pointers: one to a ...


21

If you operate on the base type, you can only access public methods and fields of it. If you want to access the extended type, but have a field of the base type where it's stored (as in your case), you first have to cast it and then you can access it: Car car = (Car)myGarage[0]; car.doSomeCarStuff(); Or shorter without temp field: ...


21

HashSet<T> calls EqualityComparer<T>.Default to get the default equality comparer when no comparer is provided. EqualityComparer<T>.Default determines if T implementsIEquatable<T>. If it does, it uses that, if not, it uses object.Equals and object.GetHashCode. Your Person object implements IEquatable<IPerson> not ...


20

The precise wording and location varies with different versions of the spec, but for example here one can read: The set of candidate methods for the method invocation is constructed. Starting with the set of methods associated with M, which were found by a previous member lookup (§7.3), the set is reduced to those methods that are applicable with respect ...


20

One typical use case is the creation of an adapter class. Think of a callback interface where you could be notified of 10 different events but are normally only interested in some of them. With an adapter class, you can provide empty implementations such that an actual callback only needs to implement those methods that are of interest after extending the ...


19

This is because Parent.a and Child.a are different things. Child#method() @Overrides Parent#method(), as they are methods. Inheritance does not apply to fields. From the Oracle JavaTM Tutorials - Inheritance, it was written that: What You Can Do in a Subclass The inherited fields can be used directly, just like any other fields. You can ...


18

Consider this implementation: public class MyClass<T1, T2> : IMyInterface<T1, T2>, IMyInterface<T2, T1> { /* implementation for IMyInterface<T1, T2> here. */ /* implementation for IMyInterface<T2, T1> here. */ } What does MyClass<int, int> implement? It implements IMyInterface<int, int> twice, because ...


18

The shortest example I can give you is if you want a list of all animals List<Animal> Animals = new List<Animal>(); Animals.Add(new Cat()); Animals.Add(new Dog()); If you have ever created a project using Winforms, you will have already used something similar since all controls derive from Control. You will then notice that a Window has a ...


18

When in doubt, look at the source (well, a source; each JVM is free to choose how to do it, as the standard does not mandate any internal representation). So I had a look, and found the following comment within the implementation of JDK 7-u60's hotspot JVM: // A Klass is the part of the klassOop that provides: // 1: language level class object (method ...


18

protected does not mean that client code can access it through a derived class instance. It does mean that derived class code can use it. For example, this would be valid: public class B : A { public void SomeMethod() { Method(); } } If you want your exact code sample to work, mark Method as public.


17

How it is restricted that subclass of java.lang.Throwable will not be generic class? Here's how OpenJDK compiler performs the check: import com.sun.tools.javac.code.Symbol.*; private void attribClassBody(Env<AttrContext> env, ClassSymbol c) { .... // Check that a generic class doesn't extend Throwable if ...


17

You could make the Base constructor private and have those two classes friends, e.g. #include <iostream> class Base { private: Base() {} friend class Derived1; friend class Derived2; }; class Derived1 : public Base { }; class Derived2 : public Base { }; int main() { Derived1 obj; Base obj2; // Error return 0; } ...


16

All member functions are polymorphic in Java by default. That means when you call this.toString() Java uses dynamic binding to resolve the call, calling the child version. When you access the member x, you access the member of your current scope (the father) because members are not polymorphic.


16

I came across UNDER THE HOOD - Objects and arrays which explains almost anything you need to know about how JVM handles arrays. In JVM, arrays are handled with special bytecodes, not like other objects we are familiar with. In the JVM instruction set, all objects are instantiated and accessed with the same set of opcodes, except for arrays. In Java, ...


15

It's frowned upon because it doesn't make sense to use that combination. Making a variable protected implies it will be used within the package or it will be inherited within a subclass. Making the variable static makes it a member of the class, eliminating the intentions of inheriting it. This leaves only the intention of being used within a package, and ...


15

"What difference is there actually in this code?:" class ChildA(Base): def __init__(self): Base.__init__(self) class ChildB(Base): def __init__(self): super(ChildB, self).__init__() The primary difference in this code is that you get a layer of indirection in the __init__ with super, which references the parent class. In ...


14

1: std::vector does not inherit from _Vector_base Or rather, not in my standard library implementation. libc++ implements vector like so: namespace std { template <class T, class Allocator = allocator<T> > class vector { ... Sure, your implementation might inherit from a base class, but my implementation does not. This leads to the first ...


13

Why would you expect it to compile? final is final, so you can't inherit from it. In your other code: struct override final { }; This is defining a final class with no base classes, so that's fine. override : final { }; This is declaring a label override, and at that label creating a prvalue temporary of type final initialized with the ...



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