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1

I don't know why you'd want to do this since you could easily circumvent this by the nature of JavaScript objects, but I liked the spirit of your question. Rather than define the method in your class, I figured why not define it for all classes? In eJohn's code I added two functions right after he declares prototype as a variable. It's a bit long for ...


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Just as an FYI, I ended up putting this in the global variable that Node creates for you. I realize that's bad practice, but it's a logging mechanism that needs to be used by any class, controller, etc., so I don't think it's that terrible of a solution. However, in Compound, you can create no_eval controllers, which means they look like typical ...


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Inheritance and subtyping are two separate concepts. A type can only inherit from its parent type; therefore inheritance is tied to the subtype relationship. However, the reverse does not hold: the subtype does not necessarily inherit anything from its parent. Language rules dictate exactly what is inherited by a subtype. On the example of Java, private ...


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The footnote reads: As it happens the notion of "subtype" is not entirely in line with "inherits from": Interfaces with no super interface are indeed subtypes of Object (§ 4.10.2. Subtyping among Class and Interface Types ) even though they do not inherit from Object. Interfaces can only extend other interfaces--none of them actually extends Object, ...


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Inheritance is a way to achieve subtyping. Taken from Wikipedia: In programming language theory, subtyping (also subtype polymorphism or inclusion polymorphism) is a form of type polymorphism in which a subtype is a datatype that is related to another datatype (the supertype) by some notion of substitutability, meaning that program elements, typically ...


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Subtyping refers to compatibility of interfaces. A type B is a subtype of A if every function that can be invoked on an object of type A can also be invoked on an object of type B. Inheritance refers to reuse of implementations. A type B inherits from another type A if some functions for B are written in terms of functions of A. Usually, a subclass can use ...


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Inheritance is explicit, subtyping is implicit. Everything (except the primitive types) is a subtype of object. If you explicitly use the extends keyword, then you are using inheritance. See also: Inheritance is not subtyping


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You shouldn't try to instance the HardwareSerial object where you declare it as a base class. This should be done in the constructor of your own object. class CUSB : public HardwareSerial { // Constructor method CUSB() : HardWareserial( /* your variables you wish to pass on to base class. */ ) { /* Initialize your own class. */ } ...


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This has been solved, it's simple Java inheritance. I used interface that is extended by both activity and in reference it cast based on Interface instead of Direct class name.


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Since the assignment to a downcast type reference can't be detected at compile time I would suggest a dynamic solution. It's an unusual case and I'd usually be against this, but using a virtual assignment operator might be required. class Ring { virtual Ring& operator = ( const Ring& ring ) { /* Do ring assignment stuff. */ ...


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I wouldn't personally mix together API controllers with HTML controllers. I find two scenarios to be standard. You do not have a traditional API (with it's own restful routes, versioning etc.) and you respond in both html and json. In which case you access the formats with a .format extension on the url or by using request headers. This uses the same ...


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You could easily solve this using composition instead of inheritance. Say there's a class A and a class B. A has a B. public class A { public B AssociatedB { get; set; } } Why...? could you please elaborate – kyle In object-oriented programming there're two approaches to create relationships between objects. Either of them are necessarily ...


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You can benefit form the composition. class A : B { } can be replaced as class A { B b } If you want that A and B can be used in the same contenxt you need to intruduce a interface. The interface allow you to define abstract functionality and have various implementations for it. interface ISampleInterface { void SampleMethod(); } In ...


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You should change class A to class A : public IA But it's not enough, as now you get multiple instances of IA in B. So you have to make the inheritance virtual: class A : virtual public IA {...}; class IB : virtual public IA {...}; UPDATE But is there a real reason for IB to be inherited from IA? If no, drop it, and you won't need virtual ...


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Having more than one methods/constructors with same name but different parameters is called overloading. This is a compile time event. Class Addition { int add(int a, int b) { return a+b; } int add(int a, int b, int c) { return a+b+c; } public static main (String[] args) { Addition addNum = new Addition(); ...


2

don't expect 100% match between your domain model and the DB schema it's related to. In your case the polymorphism would work only with tablePerHierarchy true for AbstractChildClass. If you do want to stick with tablePerHierarchy false, you can define your class like: class A { static hasMany = [ childrenOne:ExtendingClassOne, ...


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If BaseController's annotation cannot be removed, then you can use Adapter Pattern to obtain the inheritance. @Controller public class NewController { // Autowired fields BaseController base; protected x toExtend() { base.toExtend(); //new stuff } } In usual cases, either BaseController does not have @Controller ...


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_a is not a function it's an object and you wrote inherits(Parent) for js functions so call it on function and then create new object from inherited function. eg- b.prototype.y=function(){ //add y to b alert("y from b called"); } a.inherits(b);//inherits function b _a = new a();//create obj from a after inheritence ...


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First of all, The return value of new is not a function. When a function is called with new keyword, a new object is created and assigned to "this" in the constructor function and is returned. Also the object that gets created doesnt have a prototype property. As can be confirmed from : alert(typeof kid); // object alert(kid['prototype']); //undefined ...


2

On this line About.SetCompanyName(str); You're calling SetCompanyName statically (by using the class name "About"). You should either make the method static (which is not the same as "final"; you seem to be confused about this) or create an instance of the About class first, like so: About myAboutObject = new About(); myAboutObject.SetCompanyName(str);


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kid is not a function, it is an object. You can read up about the new keyword here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/new Here's some usage based on your code: var kid = Child; kid.inherits(Parent); var bart = new kid(); bart.say();


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class Alpha def self.inherited subclass store lambda{ ... subclass.name }.call end end


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Generics: public class LinkedList2<E, T extends LinkedList2>{ E data; T next; } public class LinkedSubclass extends LinkedList2<LinkedSubclass> { } It's subject to the usual restrictions on what you can do with generics (e.g. constructing new "next" values in the base class would require taking in the child type's class, or a ...


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In order to inherit added convenience initialiser automatically, your MyViewSubclass must also override plain init(), which is inherited from NSObject. class MyViewSubclass { override init() { super.init() } ... }


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In short, yes, you can redefine any rebind rules that have already been set. Simply inherit the module you are changing, then make your changes after that rebind rule. <inherits name="package.to.ModuleA" /> <set-property name="p" value="1" /> With the code above, p is always 1, so setting specific rules about what p will be is a little bit ...


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This is called co-variance (or co-variant return types): public static abstract class A { public A get() { ... } } public static abstract class B extends A { @Override public B get() { ... } } Method B#get() overrides A#get(). This is orthogonal (i.e. is conceptually unrelated) to generics.


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I don't think there's any practical reason to use it, per se, because you are correct - it gets called automatically if no super() constructor call is made explicitly. However, I'll play devil's advocate here and say that I like calls to super() simply because it's more clear with respect to how initialization is actually happening. I've found this to be ...


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First of all, the call to super constructor is always made, unless you call another constructor with this(). If you don't type super() at beginning of your constructor, the compiler will type it there for you. (I mean it will compile the file as if you would type it there) Moreover, if you ask why is the super constructor called at all if it does nothing, ...


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Your subclass will call superclass even if you will not call super() in constructor of subclass.


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With the default superclass constructor, it's simply a matter of style. If you have no call to another constructor at the start of your constructor (either super(...) or this(...)), then the compiler automatically inserts a call to super(). (The only class that's exempt from this rule is java.lang.Object.)


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I don't think there is a point. I've seen some IDEs auto-generate code that uses an explicit call to super() when it's not needed. I wish they wouldn't. It's a coding style I don't care for.


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Because $x is completely unrelated to $y. To see what I mean, look at this example: $x = new newUser($handler); $x->showdbconn(); $z = new newUser($handler); $z->showdbconn(); Since you have created two instances of newUser, you have to give the database connection to each one separately. The same is true in your example. When you create a new ...


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Minimized example: struct A { void a() const; }; struct B : A {}; template<typename U, void (U::*)() const> struct SFINAE {}; template<typename U> void Test(SFINAE<U, &U::a>*) { } int main(void) { Test<B>(0); // doesn't compile return 0; } Demo. The problem is that when B::a is inherited from A, the type of ...


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A nested master page does not inherit it's parent master page's type. Instead it composes itself such that the NestedMasterType.Master property is an instance of the parent master page. The NestedMasterType type still inherits from System.Web.UI.MasterPage. So this is right: public partial class ChildMasterPage : System.Web.UI.MasterPage This is wrong: ...


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The problem is not that the new keyword is not working anymore but rather it lies in the following line: GridPart.prototype = new Container('grd-part'); What it does is cause all GridPart objects to have the same this.components object. So when you call this.addComponent inside the GridPart constructor function you override the same this.components object ...


1

Glancing over your code, I suspect the problem is that every instance of Grid and GridPart share the same components object. You could verify this by having a look at the prototype chain or check the result of grd.getComponent('body').components === grd.getComponent('foot').components. Don't do something like Grid.prototype = new Container('grd'); it ...


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Make it simple: do one serializer for foos and one serializer for bars dont use has_many in your baz serializer Do this way: class AbstractClassShortSerializer < AbstractClassShortSerializer attributes common_attributes_here end class BarSerializer < AbstractClassShortSerializer end class BazSerializer < ActiveModel::Serializer ...


0

Something like this (each public class in its own file, of course): package uni; public class CollegeCourse { protected String dept; public CollegeCourse(String dept) { this.dept = dept; } public String toString() { return this.dept; } } public class LabCourse extends CollegeCourse { private String labFee; ...


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public class CollegeCourse{ //implement your class here } //in another file public class LabCourse extends CollegeCourse{ // add the extras datas here } Please let me know if I misunderstood you


1

I tested with the following code, and dumbchild correctly prints the height as 64. Was there any problem originally? All I did is to add definition of remove() in the code that returning an anonymous instance of Iterator<T>. import java.util.Iterator; class dumbchild<K extends Comparable<? super K>, V> extends MyTreeMap<K, V> ...


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Judging by the title of your question, I take it that you don't fully understand when functions get hidden, overloaded, and overwritten. Sample code 1: struct Base { void foo() { } }; struct Derive: public Base { void foo() { } }; int main() { Derive d; Base *pb=&d; d.foo(); // Resolves to Derived::foo() pb->foo(); ...


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Since foo is not virtual, the function called is based on the static type (i.e., the type the pointer is declared to point at) rather than the dynamic type (the type of object to which the pointer currently refers). There are also some trickier cases to consider. One point (on which some of the other answers are actually somewhat misleading) is that it's ...


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This has the huge pitfall that if you wrote Student.prototype.constructor = Student; but then if there was a Teacher whose prototype was also Person and you wrote Teacher.prototype.constructor = Teacher; then the Student constructor is now Teacher! Edit: You can avoid this by ensuring that you had set the Student and Teacher prototypes using new ...


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There's no overloading or overwriting that's going on in this code. Base::foo is being called rather than Derive::foo because there hasn't been any specification by the programmer to use dynamic binding for the name foo. If the virtual-specifier isn't provided, the compiler finds the function based on the static type of the object on which it is called, ...


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You see this behavior because foo() is not declared as virtual in Base. In C++, member functions are non-virtual by default. You must explicitly declare a function as virtual in order to take advantage of dynamic dispatching and polymorphism.


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Function Base::foo is non-virtual. It is called because the pointer to the base class is used. If you change the code like this: class Base { public: virtual void foo() // add virtual { cout<<"Base."<<endl; } }; the output should be "Derived".


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If you feel like inheritance is the best way to model this then don't let Angular/JavaScript stop you from using it. You could set this up in Angular with something like this: var ParentService = function() { this.totalItems = 0; this.currentPage = 1; this.itemsPerPage = 10; } var Service1 = function() { ParentService.call(this); } ...


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When using the standard .NET XmlSerializer (to which the IntermediateSerializer is similar), all properties that are to be serialized / deserialized must have a public getter and setter. See here for details on this: Why isn't my public property serialized by the XmlSerializer? The MS documentation has a simple tutorial also on serializing game data ...


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Override this initializer when creating views from storyboard: - (id)initWithCoder:(NSCoder *)aDecoder { self = [super initWithCoder: aDecoder]; if (self) { [self makeImageViewRounded]; } return self; }


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According to the The ECMAScript Language Specification, The initial value of Object.prototype.constructor is the standard built-in Object constructor. In other words, it's just a pointer to the Object's actual, native constructor-- The one that is called via new Object(). Thus, you can override it without changing anything about how new Object() ...



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