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0

It seems java.util.Properties will not be changed ever, so it is safe to extend the class and bring my functionality there. I also consider switching to a different API in the future to implement the mechanism.


0

A subclass of this sort would not be a legitimate subclass. Even if all of its fields and methods were declared static, it would inherit all of the fields and methods of all of its superclasses, all the way back up to Object. And there are non-static methods in Object. So this subclass would have some set of non-static methods (and possibly fields) in its ...


0

If only adding subclasses and can only create the parent class, the child "class" is really just a helper class without adding any functionality/responsibilites/etc. to the parent. In many respects, it's meaningless.


3

what if my subclass only adds static fields and methods, and I'm only interested in using the static fields and methods of the superclass In that case you don't need inheritance - use composition!


0

You should seal your class by declaring it as final. Then it is guaranteed that no sub-classes can be made


0

I've wrote this little library to handle json+hal resources. It's pretty simple to use. Check the examples here: https://github.com/nvellon/hal Any kind of contributions are very welcome!


1

It is a bug in the MSVC and it also appears in the latest version which they provide online. So, please, submit a bug report. Relevant discussion might be found in other SO question. It contains some excerpts from the standard which explain why it should work.


1

I consider the thing you're trying to do as a sort of type juggling like PHP uses; the 'reference type' can be changed at runtime. Java, in contrast, uses typed variables. You define a reference which you call something, that is, the variable name, with in our case the type Person. Now you can so to speak 'link' an object to the variable name. That object ...


0

You're only ever declaring the result as a Parameter, and a parent class has no knowledge of what its children have declared (or that would break encapsulation). If you want to be sure that you always get the right type, then consider passing in the Class that you want to use in that scenario. A sample signature would look like this: public static <T ...


2

A Parent class can never knows who are those Child classes which are inherited from it. If you have define a method in the Child class it can only be accessed by/called upon Child class instance . While the reverse in not true, if a method is defined in Parent Class all the Child class instances can access it/call it. Eg:- Object o = new String("Hi"); ...


0

You can't use the subclass methods because in Parameter p = Parameter.init((String) box.getSelectedItem()); you are declaring p as type Parameter. You will only ever be able to call the methods declared in Parameter. You could explicitly cast the created subclass after the fact like so: Parameter p = Parameter.init((String) box.getSelectedItem()); ...


3

Well, this is one way of doing it: class Grandparent(object): def my_method(self): print "Grandparent" class Parent(Grandparent): def my_method(self): print "Parent" class Child(Parent): def my_method(self): print "Hello Grandparent" Grandparent.my_method(self) Maybe not what you want, but it's the best python ...


1

Hehe, my favourite C++ oddity! This will work: void foo() { b = this->a; // ^^^^^^ } Unqualified lookup doesn't work here because the base is a template. That's just the way it is, and comes down to highly technical details about how C++ programs are translated.


0

As others have already pointed out, inheritance does not allow you to make one object become something else. What you are trying to do might better be implemented as an attribute. This is also a very flexible solution as you can easily add other attributes. class Person { private boolean isPerson; // ... } If you want to be more flexible, you could ...


2

I can't make sense of your idea of "becoming." You created an object whose type is a derived class, and access it through a variable that is of the base class's type. Nothing becomes anything in this scenario- the object's contents are unchanged. Similarly, the constructor only uses an object as an argument to guide what contents the resulting object should ...


2

That's impossible in Java. Once an object is created as a certain type, it remains that type for the remainder of its lifetime. So if you create a Parent, you can refer to it as an Object, a Person, or a Parent, but underneath it will always be a Parent, and that cannot be changed after the object is created.


0

Strings are objects in java, as said its not overridden but as you pass a string it will run the first available method that can the the argument, in this case it is the super-class's method.


1

The parent class has no method with the signature public void foo(String s). Therefore, at compile time, the compiler can only choose the public void foo(Object o) method for executing p.foo("hello"). Since the child class doesn't override this method (it doesn't have the same parameter type), the parent class's foo method is the one executed at runtime.


2

SubClass#foo() does not override ParentClass#foo() because it doesn't have the same formal parameters. One takes Object and the other takes a String. Therefore polymorphism at runtime is not applied and does not cause the subclass method to execute. From the Java Language Specification: An instance method mC declared in or inherited by class C, overrides ...


1

You cannot access deriv1 private data members from deriv2. You have two options to overcome that : Do a getter to access your m_member1 in your deriv1 class. class deriv1 : public base { private: int m_member1; public: int get_member1() const { return m_member1; } [...] } Use protected on m_member1 and make your deriv2 also derived from deriv1. ...


0

Throwing the same code example (well commenting out conio.h and getch()) through clang provides this: Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64: "vtable for dim3_point", referenced from: dim3_point::dim3_point() in stackex-7c554b.o dim3_point::dim3_point(float, float, float, unsigned int) in stackex-7c554b.o ...


1

why overriding methods can throw unchecked exception in java ? Any method in Java can throw an unchecked exception. An overriding method is also a method so it gets the same privileges as other methods when it comes to unchecked exceptions. I just want to know why Overriding methods CAN throw unchecked exception while cannot throw checked ...


2

Let's say a base class has the following method: int foo() throws IOException; That means that the method can return an int throw a checked IOException throw any runtime exception it wants, because runtime exception don't need to be declared in the throws clause Now let's override this method in a subclass. The subclass must obey the contract of the ...


2

I recommend you read about inheritance and Polymorphism in more detail. (here and here) In this answer I try to keep concepts simple enough. Why is this statement allowed and is there a situation where this statement would be useful to a programmer? But in order to explain your question a bit lets take a look at simple and classic example of object ...


1

First off, the question why it's allowed, is simply because an instance of the derived class is an instance of the base class (subtype polymorphism). Same goes for being able to assign any derived class to an object variable: all .net classes derive from object in the end, so you could also have done object baseObj = new DerivedClass(). The goal of the type ...


1

As per my understanding in java,You are trying to call object of DerivedClass by using BaseClass reference varibale baseobj and this coding scenario is totally valid because it is providing the facility of runtime polymorphism. Before runtime polymorphism lets understand the Upcasting. When reference variable of parent class is used to refer the object of ...


0

I'm posting this as an answer because it does fulfill the requirements in the question. Even though I marked a a correct answer. I think it's appropriate to post my final approach. #include <iostream> /* Signal Container */ template <typename Ret> class Signal; template <typename Ret, typename... Args> class Signal< Ret (Args...) > ...


2

You can't do what you want in C++11 or C++14 in an easy way. Concepts might give us something, but for now your template arguments must be either a type, a class template, or a value. In your case, you want a pack of Signals which can only be specified as: template <typename... Sigs> class Emitter; Within the class, you can then use static_assert to ...


0

I don't agree with using Plugins to accomplish multiple inheritance in Ext. Plugins are intended to changed behaviour or add new functionality. The right way to achieve multiple inheritance is by using Mixins, please watch this amazing explanation SenchaCon 2011: The Sencha Class System Ext.define('FunctionalityA', { methodA: function () { ...


1

You don't have to match all inner types of Signal in your class template Emitter. You just have to state it is a template receiving parameters. After that, you'll need to recur up to the minimum number of Signal<T>'s you may allow in your application. Supposing the minimum is one, here is a solution. /* Signal Container */ template <typename ...


4

You can use a factory method to instance the monster sub-classes. public abstract Monster { public string name; public string specie; public Stats baseStats; public string imgDir; public static Monster CreateMonster(string monster) { Type[] types = GetTypeInfo().Assembly.GetTypes(); Type monsterType = ...


0

I am pretty sure that unwanted fields belongs to class Engine public void setEngine(String engine)// setEngine by using switch loop to // invoke the classes that extend from // engine { switch (engine) { case "Hybrid": setEngine(new Hybrid()); break; case "Gasoline": ...


1

In your proposed problem you claim the need for a method in A and B that is not polymorphic and yet exhibits different behaviour in the two classes (linked by inheritance) with the same signature. In addition, the method defers to a free function found by ADL (good!). So... my question to you is this. If you already have the guarantee of a free function ...


1

Because hasOwnProperty is not enumerable , you can test it using console.log(Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(Object.prototype, "hasOwnProperty").enumerable)


7

Because Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty is non-enumerable: Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(Object.prototype, 'hasOwnProperty') .enumerable // false Therefore, it's not iterated by the for...in loop.


-1

#include <iostream> struct A { int i; A(): i(0) {}; virtual ~A() {}; virtual void thisf() { std::cout << i << std::endl; } }; struct B: public A { int j; B(): j(1) {}; void thisf() { A::thisf(); std::cout << j << std::endl; } }; void f( A* a ) { a->thisf(); } int main() { A* a = new A(); A* b = new ...


1

You don't have to provide member function definitions inside a class definition: class A; class B; class A { // no need for public B * b; void a_funct(void); }; class B { // no need for public here, too A * a; void b_funct(void); }; // the following goes in a source file, // otherwise you should mark it as inline void A::a_funct() { ...


4

There is is not such special property as prototype for objects that would act like the one for functions. What you want is just Object.create( x );: var x = { name: "I am x" }; // object that will get properties of prototype object var y = Object.create( x ); // check console.log( y.__proto__ ); // verify prototype is x console.log( ...


5

You can use Std.is: class Subclass extends OriginalClass implements IMyInterface {} var myObj = new Subclass(); var isClass = Std.is(myObj, OriginalClass); // returns true var isSubclass = Std.is(myObj, Subclass); // also returns true var isInterface = Std.is(myObj, IMyInterface); // also returns true Will return "true" if the second ...


0

You will ran in to many problems like this in future if you will not change your coding style. You should learn SOLID principles of object oriented programming at first. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SOLID_%28object-oriented_design%29 And then study design patterns. Derek Banas youtube channel comes at help, since he very clearly explains design patterns. In ...


0

public interface IDemo1 { void Test(); } public interface IDemo2 { void Test(); } public class clsDerived:IDemo1,IDemo2 { void IDemo1.Test() { Console.WriteLine("IDemo1 Test is fine"); } void IDemo2.Test() { Console.WriteLine("IDemo2 Test is fine"); } } public void get_methodes() { IDemo1 obj1 = new clsDerived(); IDemo2 obj2 = ...


1

While functions are objects in javascript, they aren't regular objects. Specifically, they're objects for which inheritance is broken. Functions are not the only such objects in the language, DOM elements are similarly handicapped. That's one reason jQuery is implemented as wrapper around DOM rather than extending the DOM's features via inheritance. ...


2

The point of making a variable private is to prevent anything outside the class from accessing or changing it. If the developer of the class wanted it to be viewable or changeable by subclasses it would have been made protected. However, it is possible to change the value using reflection (as long as the security manager is not configured to disallow that). ...


3

The most reasonable way to get a Java class implementing a trait which has a constructor and/or non-abstract members is to extend the trait with a class in Scala, then extend this class in Java: // AbstractA.scala abstract class AbstractA extends A // B.java class B extends AbstractA This way the Scala compiler takes care of all the stuff you have to do ...


2

That would become something like: public interface A { } public abstract class A$class { public static void $init$(A $this) { Predef..MODULE$.println((Object)"A"); } } using a decompiler. Java speaking, that is: A a = new AImpl(); A$class.$init$(a);


0

Most easiest way to update versions imo: mvn versions:set -DgenerateBackupPoms=false (do that in your root/parent pom folder). Your poms are parsed and you're asked which version to set.


1

Your class B has a default constructor, B() - because you didn't explicitly define any other one. That constructor implicitly calls its super constructor, A(). But you have explicitly made that one private to class A, so you have explicitly declared that no other class, including B, can have access to it.


0

public class B extends A { /* * The default constructor B means * public () B {super();} */ public B() { } } So you should define a constructor which is accessible by the class B You can change the access modifier for parent Constructor Or else you can define other Constructor in parent class which is accessible by class B and call that ...


0

An instance of class B creates an instance of class A so B must invoke super(...) if A implements a non default constractor. So the constructor should be protected for B being able to call super(...)


0

Can work class A { private A() { } public A(int i){ } } public class B extends A { private A(){ super(10); } } Or remove the private A(), defaults to public A(), unless you have another constructor class A { } public class B extends A { private A(){ super(); } }



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