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5

This can only realistically work in very simple cases, as you show here. There are other cases where the compiler cannot even tell if the member variable was initialized before use. For example: // a.h void init_a(a & an_a); // a.cpp #include "a.h" void init_a(a & an_a) { an_a.x = 1; } // b.cpp #include "a.h" int test() { a oa; ...


4

Firstly, I'll remove the constructor with csvData. Why on earth a product has to know about where does it comes from? It could be CSV, Database, XML, etc. It makes no sense to have it as a field in Product class. Then create a ProductFactory (or a ProductParser) with single method which creates the Product out of CSV, if anything wrong, it should throw ...


4

If you declare a variable outside of the loop and not use it past the loop, the compiler will move the declaration inside the loop. That means there is no reason to compare efficiency here, since you end up with the same exact code that the JVM will run for the two approaches. So the following code: int sum; for(int i=0; i<10; i++) { sum=0; } ... ...


3

The only reason to opt for approach #2 is if you are forced to use a very old C compiler, which prohibits the approach #1. You should also try declaring your variables in the smallest scope where they make sense. One exception is when you unconditionally assign a value to a variable from the outer scope inside an inner scope, i.e. int x; do { x = ...


3

It can be done with C99 compound-literals and a slight change: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/4497d2645ad21b74 typedef struct STRLIST{ unsigned int size; char** list; } STRLIST; static STRLIST listMediaType = { .size = 7, .list = (char*[]){ "Book", "Map", "Booklet", "Pamphlet", "Magazine", ...


3

It will be default constructed if you simply remove the = ?? part. This is the same as setting it to null (i.e. calling reset()). By the way, something interesting about class statics is that even POD types like raw pointers and integral types will by default have the value zero when your program starts. So even an "uninitialized" raw pointer will be ...


3

You're looking for a HashMap, which maps keys to their values. HashMap<String, Integer> map = new HashMap<>(); map.put("Martin", 0); // etc System.out.println(map.get("Martin")); You can see the official documentation for what you can do this with, but this is the class you will need specifically.


2

I discussed this in a follow-up to the blog post referenced in the question. If for some reason you can't use boost::call_once your block-scoped static is a pointer, POD, or has a thread-safe constructor, you can write the same initialization guard code that GCC would emit: // Define a static local variable once, safely, for MSVC // // This macro is ...


2

struct a a[] = { {(int[]){1,2},(int[]){3,4}, 2}, {(int[]){1},(int[]){3}, 1} };


1

You can create a "proxy" function that initializes your vector. This uses template deduction to find the size of the array automatically. template <typename T, std::size_t N> std::vector<int*> init_vector(T (&foo)[N]) { std::vector<int*> vec; for (std::size_t i = 0; i < N; ++i) { vec.push_back(&foo[i]); } ...


1

Separate data and its representation; CSV is just a representation (and that's why should not be stored in the object) of actual data that is ProductId, Name, Quantiry values: public class Product { // You don't need any CSV here: CSV is the representation of the data public int ProductId { get; set; } public string Name { get; set; } public int ...


1

Create the option for two-level validation: Make the ValidateCSV method static so that whatever is creating the new Product (e.g. the UI) can call that method before attempting to create the product. Then, separately, call the validation inside the constructor, and throw an exception if it fails.


1

You may check this code: #include <stdio.h> typedef struct { unsigned int size; char* list[]; } STRLIST; static STRLIST listMediaType = { 7, { "Book", "Map", "Booklet", "Pamphlet", "Magazine", "Report", "Journal" } }; int main() { printf("struct size: %d\n", ...


1

You could define them as an Enum with (hopefully immutable) behaviour: enum Person { MARTIN { public String pName() { return "something here"; } public int pNumber() { return 0; } }, PAUL { public String pName() { return "something else"; } public int ...


1

If you read e.g. this std::vector constructor reference you will see that the items in the vector will be initialized either with Node() or value-initialized. Both of these are equivalent for POD types and will value-initialize all the members in the structure, i.e. set all members to zero.


1

This leads us to concentrate on performance and optimization of code in looping concepts. From a maintenance perspective, second case is better. Declare and initialize variables in the same place, in the narrowest scope possible. Don't leave a gaping hole between the declaration and the initialization.The scope of local variables should always be the ...


1

An anonymous type is just a type with properties, your anonymus type has no properties: private static Dictionary<int, object> MAPS = new Dictionary<int, object> { {1, new { Prop1 = 1, Prop2 = 2, Prop3 = 3}} }; But how do you want to cast from object to that anoymous type? Edit: Good question there, though. Do I have to cast MAPS[1][0] or ...


1

The syntax new {1, 2, 3} is not a collection initializer nor an anonymous object initializer. What type of object do you want to create? Use something like new { elements = new[] { 1, 2, 3 } } to give the anonymous object an elements property containing the integers. Or you can name the individual properties: new { foo = 1, bar = 2, baz = 3 }.


1

Try this if you want an array of ints as the value. private static Dictionary<int, object> MAPS = new Dictionary<int, object> { {1, new[] {1, 2, 3}} }; Or this if you want an anonymous class private static Dictionary<int, object> MAPS = new Dictionary<int, object> { {1, new { a = 1, b = 2, c = 3}} }; Or better yet don't use ...


1

Your first constructor is a default constructor, and from what you've shown us, it simply assigns some (I assume) member variable named valore to a default constructed object of type Dati. Your second constructor is a conversion constructor (my terminology, not standard) that accepts an object of type Dati and assigns it to your member variable. I call it a ...


1

You can't assign Matcher with input you don't have yet. String input; Pattern legalInput = Pattern.compile("a-fA-F0-9"); // Matcher match = legalInput.matcher(input); // <-- input isn't set yet. Move it into your while loop, just after you assign input - input = keyboard.nextLine(); Matcher match = legalInput.matcher(input); // <-- now input is ...


1

You should use something like (Adding to BLUEPIXY's answer) static int arr1[] = {1, 2}; static int arr2[] = {3, 4}; static int arr3[] = {1}; static int arr4[] = {3}; struct a a[] = { {arr1, arr2, 2}, {arr3, arr4, 1} }; Live code here Further reading: equivalence of pointers and arrays in C



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