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0

This is not constant because casting to int could require conversion, e.g. on a Linux x86_64 system, where sizeof(int) is 4 while sizeof(void *) is 8. Generally, casting a pointer to an integer type could always require conversion, even if you use intptr_t (which you should ...), because this could be actually larger than your pointer. In contrast, the ...


1

Which part of C specification makes this erroneous? Since pstr is global, it has static storage duration. Therefore, section 6.7.8.4 of the C99 standard applies: All the expressions in an initializer for an object that has static storage duration shall be constant expressions or string literals. The address of "test string" cannot be resolved ...


0

If this snippet of code is at the global level, i.e. outside of a function, the second line is indeed invalid. Global variables can only be initialized with a constant expression. Anything else is a statement and must reside in a function.


1

I believe, you're doing int pstr = (int)str; in global space. A statement is not allowed to exist in global scope. It needs to be in function scope. A special case, initialization while definition is allowed, but the condition is the initializer needs to be a compile time constant. Here, str is not a compile time constant value. Hence the error. FWIW, ...


0

Just override init() and that should do it. class feedBack: NSObject, NSCoding { var choiceA = 0 var choiceB = 0 var choiceC = 0 var choiceD = 0 var choiceNULL = 0 var sheetName = "" func encodeWithCoder(aCoder: NSCoder) { aCoder.encodeObject(self.choiceA, forKey: "choiceA") aCoder.encodeObject(self.choiceB, ...


0

OK haha, I managed to solve it after checking this answer. I needed to bind <Configure> event to the canvas, and define a function that does stuff when window is resized. It's working now! try: from Tkinter import * except ImportError: from tkinter import * class GUI: textid = 0 def __init__(self): # root window of the whole ...


1

This is less a linker problem than a compiler/run-time problem. The complete answer varies from system to system of course, but for gcc/clang on Linux goes something like this. Any specific symbols or sections that I'll mention are for the ARM, other processors may be different. I copied you little example program into the ELLCC demo, which is a clang based ...


1

redo to the following: const int size = sizeof(array1)/sizeof(int);


5

num = 0; is a statement that can exist only inside a function. It cannot exist in a global scope. If you put a statement outside a function, it's wrong and not allowed. Simply think this like, if you have a statement outside all the functions, in a global scope, when and how that statement can be executed? So, that's wrong. A special case, initialization ...


0

I figured it out. Photoswipe loads the full items array every a photo modal is opened. So that needs to be done when new elements are added is to append the new items to the array using JavaScript's array push.


2

This does not work with g++. You are essentially using C constructs with C++. Couple of ways to get around it. 1) Remove the "." and change "=" to ":" when initializing. #include <iostream> using namespace std; struct ib_connection { int x; }; struct ibv_device { int y; }; struct app_data { int port; int ib_port; ...


1

A bunch of issues. You cannot initialize a struct as you do; reefer below: struct app_data { int port; int ib_port; unsigned size; int tx_depth; int sockfd; char *servername; //struct ib_connection local_connection; //struct ib_connection *remote_connection; //struct ibv_device *ib_dev; void intialize() { ...


2

I think in class initialization was introduced in the current standard to enhance readability and consistency. Without you'll need to take care about consistent initializations in every constructor. Such it's better to use the 1st form you proposed: class A { // ... private: int m_member = 1; // ... }


2

I will add a bit info in terms of memory management, in addition to what others said. 1) The main difference is here: const int MAX_BUF = 1000; char* Buffer = malloc(MAX_BUF); You need to manage the allocated memory manually, e.g., free Buffer when you are done using it. Forgetting to free it (or freeing it twice) may lead to trouble. 2) With the ...


2

char* Buffer = malloc(MAX_BUF); creates a char pointer Buffer, dynamically allocates MAX_BUF bytes of memory via the malloc and makes Buffer point to the start of the allocated space. This memory is allocated on the heap. char Buffer[MAX_BUF]; creates an array Buffer of size MAX_BUF which can hold a maximum of MAX_BUF characters. Note that you are ...


2

Case 1: In char Buffer[MAX_BUF]; Buffer is an array of size MAX_BUF. The allocation technique is called VLA. Case 2: In const int MAX_BUF = 1000; char* Buffer = malloc(MAX_BUF); Buffer is a pointer which is allocated a memory of size MAX_BUF which is 1000. and, an array is not the same as a pointer, and C-FAQ has a Very Good collection detailing ...


2

spotted the problem: class Celsius < Temperature def initialze(n) # should be initialize super(:c => n) end end


2

You want: Members = new List<Colleague> { new Colleague { FirstName = "Thomas", LastName = "Tank" }, new Colleague { FirstName = "Honey", LastName = "Booboo" } } Since it's a list of Colleague to which you're trying to add it.


1

There are type mismatches var workoutType: NSString --> init : String var workoutDesc: NSString --> init : String and later NSArray <--> Array Since Swift 1.2 the Foundation basic types are not implicitly casted to the Swift counterparts I recommend to use only the Swift types


0

From [class.base.init]: non-static data members are initialized in the order they were declared in the class definition (again regardless of the order of the mem-initializers). In this case, the ordering would be equivalent to: int a = 1; int b = 2; int c; int d = 4; c = 3;


3

Using the parentheses guarantees that all elements of the array are initialized to 0. I just tried using the following code: #include <iostream> using namespace std; int main(int,char*[]){ int* foo = new int[8]; cout << foo << endl; for(int i = 0; i < 8; i++) foo[i] = i; delete[] foo; foo = new int[8]; ...


8

This line default-initializes length ints, which is to say you will get a bunch of ints with indeterminate value: int *foo = new int[length]; This line value-initializes them instead, so you get all zeros: int *foo = new int[length]();


2

Given your restrictions, I believe in C++03 your only option is to declare the variable outside the if statement, adding braces for scoping: { Foo f(51, 52); if (f) { //... } } In C++11 you could exploit braced initialization syntax: if (Foo f{51, 52}) { //... }


2

Because the C++03 standard only allows assignment initialisation inside conditions: condition: expression type-specifier-seq declarator = assignment-expression


9

In C++03, one could solely use the copy-initialization syntax: selection-statement:        if ( condition ) statement         […] condition:        expression        type-specifier-seq declarator = assignment-expression Since C++11, list-initialization was ...


2

Long running code really ought to be done using Android services. I would recommend doing your complicated logic in a service that your various "Activity" classes (which correspond to the views of your application) simply consume. Services can outlive the UI of the application and can also be started / initialized in response to various other events (like ...


1

When you start a new Activity from the loading Activity call the finish() method to close that activity and it will be deleted from the applications activity stack. like below: startActivity(intent); finish(); For the question for passing data through activities, extend the Android Application class, where you can define the global state and variables of ...


-1

Answer found. A simple, stupid mistake on my part (haha) After changing the file name to "sign-up.php", I forgot to remove the PHP extension. So, naturally, my server did not know where to look for it


3

Just change your declaration of a, b and n to: int a = 0, b = 0, n = 0; The Java compiler cannot tell that you have initialized these variables in the for-loop because you are going through the for-loop a variable number of times (that number being the variable y). Although you declared y to have the value 4 just above the for-loop, and we can see that ...


1

Another option is using expand.grid v1 <- 1:10 l <- length(v1) n <- 3 A <- array(rowSums(expand.grid(rep(list(v1), n))), dim= rep(l, n)) A[1, 2, 3] #[1] 6 A[4, 8, 9] #[1] 21


0

thePlayers[i] = new Player(i); I just deleted the i inside Player(i); and it worked. so the code line should be: thePlayers[i] = new Player9();


3

Nested outer calls seem to do the trick (here just up to 3 for visibility): outer(outer(1:3,1:3,"+"),1:3,"+") Or to duplicate your example: > A=outer(outer(1:10,1:10,"+"),1:10,"+") > A[1,2,3] [1] 6 > A[4,8,9] [1] 21


0

The second sample doesn't work simply because Value is a static member of Subclass. C# syntax allows Superclass.Values, but eventually the compiled method call will be to the Subclass.Values getter. So the type Superclass is never actually touched. Superclass.SuperclassA1 on the other hand does touch the type and triggers the static initialization. This is ...


1

Add this to the controller $scope.item = {};


1

You can add $scope.item = {} in first line of your controller. Javascript reports error when you are trying to access $scope.item.name when $scope.item itself doesn't exist (or not an object in some cases). When you do ng-init, angular creates the object for you so you don't get the error.


0

The idea of segue is creating and presenting the UIViewController without any code. For the developer, the points that you gain by getting the app flow is much more that the initialisation issue (but still, it could be nice to have them both). I think that if you will made some DataSource protocols with required functions, it will be hard to miss those ...


7

To be absolutely clear, consider int *a = new int; int *b = new int(); *a is not initialised, *b is initialised to 0. Use of *a prior to initialisation is undefined behaviour.


4

Yes. You can value-initialize it (i.e set it to zero for an int) by using new int().


1

Unfortunately for MKAnnotationView forces you to implement init(frame: CGRect) which means you have to initialise all your instance variables in that method as well. This article explains it a bit more For variables that can only be initialised with passed in values you have to make those variables optional and set them to nil in the init(frame: CGRect). ...


1

Just to add on top of the other answers. In order to initialize a complex static member, you can do it as follows: Declare your static member as usual. // myClass.h class myClass { static complexClass s_complex; //... }; Make a small function to initialize your class if it's not trivial to do so. This will be called just the one time the static member is ...


0

In your Recorded Audio Class, add the initialization code: class RecordedAudio: NSObject{ var filePathUrl: NSURL! var title: String! init(filePathUrl: NSURL, title: String) { self.filePathUrl = filePathUrl self.title = title } } Then, in your audioRecorderDidFinishRecording method, in the ViewController you are doing the ...


0

Consider the following code: void blah(IDictionary<int,int> dict) { for (int i=0; i<10; i++) { if ((i & 11) != 0) { int j; dict.TryGetValue(i, out j); System.Diagnostics.Debug.Print("{0}",j); j++; } } } Suppose that the TryGetValue method of the passed-in implementation of ...


0

Local variables are stack variables. They are not initialized (unlike static variables). So better initialize yourself.


2

In your code, printf("the value is %d", a+'a'); produces undefined behaviour. The output of UB, is, well, undefined. You cannot rely upon (or justify) the outcome (if any) for a statement which invokes UB.


1

Here is used an expression with the comma operator as an initializer int k = (a++, ++a); According to the C Standard (and the same is valid for C++ ) (6.5.17 Comma operator): 2 The left operand of a comma operator is evaluated as a void expression; there is a sequence point between its evaluation and that of the right operand. Then the right ...


1

This is perfectly well-defined in both C and C++. The expressions separated by the comma are evaluated from left to right. The value of the entire expression will be the value of the second expression. So, to break down (a++, ++a), a++ is first evaluated (then a is -4) and the result (-5) discarded, then ++a is evaluated. That value (-3) is assigned to k. ...


1

This is not undefined behaviour. In your code, int k = (a++, ++a); is making use of "comma operator". After a gets initialized to -5, what is does is basically, execute a++, discard the result. side effect of post-++, a is now -4 encounters , , sequence point. execute ++a, return the result. a is now -3 (pre-++), which gets assigned to k. Ref: From ...


5

It works because of the , operator which creates a sequence point. §5.19.1 (Comma operator) The comma operator groups left-to-right. A pair of expressions separated by a comma is evaluated left-to-right; the left expression is a discarded value expression (Clause 5). Every value computation and side effect associated with the left expression is ...


1

The command is chkconfig --add [name] not chkconfig --add [path] so you want chkconfig --add redis. That being said on a systemd system you shouldn't even bother with a init.d service script since you don't need it. The "legacy" service command was updated to handle starting systemd services normally so you possibly/probably aren't even using your script ...


1

First there is not enough code posted to tell exactly what is happening, and the rest of code is rather bad and I just cannot even imagine what you are trying to do here and what was your actual problem. Maybe your first draft code before you tried to fix it in wrong way would be more telling. gameView.onTouchEvent(event, xcoords, ycoords) != null In ...



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