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3

In C++11, what you have works fine (assuming you add an identifier name to the variable declaration). In versions prior, one approach would be to have a free function that builds the map: typedef std::map<std::string, std::pair<some_enum, std::string> > map_type; static map_type create_map() { map_type map; map["1234a"] = ...


1

The best way in C++11: std::map<string, pair<some_enum, std::string>> my_map = { { "1234a", { BOSS, "Alice" }}, { "5678b", { SLAVE, "Bob" }}, { "1111b", { IT_GUY, "Cathy" }}, }; It's that easy. It's not possible at all in standard C++03 without using external libraries like boost.


1

This is a GCC-ism. When initializing a structure, one could prefix the initialisation values with the name of the structure field. This allows the initialisers to follow a random order and makes it more clear what field a given values goes to.


6

This is a non-standard, GCC-specific initialization syntax for structures. It's colloquially called the "old-style GNU struct init syntax". Its standard equivalent is something like struct Foo bar = { .name1 = value1, .name2 = value2 }; You can read more about it in the GCC documentation.


0

I normally prefer to do something like that in onAttach(that is when the fragment has been fully attached to the view): @public void onAttach(Activity activity) { super.onAttach(activity); //save an activity instance for use later this.mActivity = activity; //instantiate your array adapter and even pass values here ............. } That ...


2

getActivity() returns null if the Fragment is not yet attached to an Activity. The ArrayAdapter is being instantiated in the constructor (that's when member variables with assignments get assigned), and at that point the Fragment has not yet been attached to the Activity. You can declare the ArrayAdapter and wait to instantiate it in onCreateView or ...


7

I believe that the error-generating construction is forbidden by the language standard, specifically (in the Fortran 2008 version) by C506 on R503. That constraint states An initialization shall not appear if object-name is a dummy argument, a function result, an object in a named common block unless the type declaration is in a block data program ...


0

Java give value class variables, I mean they are initialized by JVM and you can use them. But you must to search their default values to use them correctly. On the other hand, JVM does not initialize the local variables which is created in methods. So if you create any variable on methods you have to assign them to a value before use them.


2

If we are talking about class fields than all variables of primitive types are set to 0 (numeric ones like int, long, double...) \u0000 (char) false (boolean). object types like String, Integer, or AnyOtherClass are set to null so actually it doesn't matter if you will set it explicitly, because private int x; private Integer y; is equivalent ...


0

First, you cannot initialize an int value with null. The default value of an int is zero, but initializing it in both the field declaration and the constructor is pointless. Assuming the compiler does not omit the field initializer completely, it effectively compiles to this: public class Test { private int value; public Test(int value) { ...


0

If not specified,: primitive bytes, shorts, ints, longs, floats and doubles are initialized to 0 booleans are initialized to false Objects are initialized to null


0

A not initialized int is always 0 on heap. It can't never be null. Mind: within a method it must be initialized, not only declared.


0

WPF Window class created in Visual Studio usually has InitializeComponent method that is used to initialize its properties and contents - What does InitializeComponent() do, and how does it work in WPF?. It is generated from your XAML markup and is not contained in you code-behind .cs file, but for the compiler(and msbuild.exe) it is still a valid intrinsic ...


1

using + u are creating a class method, so can access it like this [customUIImageView initWithFrame:frame imageName:imageName]; May be it can help u


0

Change + to - in the method definition in interface and implementation and all will works. You need a instance method not a class so instead: + (instancetype)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame imageName:(NSString*)imageName; you need - (instancetype)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame imageName:(NSString*)imageName;


1

InitializeComponent method is generated automatically in MainWindow.g.cs when you define MainWindow.xaml.


1

Like I said in my comment, read. Reading properly is a virtue you'll need during your programming career. You need to closely follow the note in the book: To create this example, you must code the Window1 class from scratch (right-click the Solution Explorer and choose Add -> Class to get started). You can't choose Add -> Window, because that will add ...


1

It doesn't make sense to set a default value to a computed property because it doesn't have a proper value : [...] computed properties, which do not actually store a value. Instead, they provide a getter and an optional setter to retrieve and set other properties and values indirectly. Maybe you want to set the default in the layer type, like : class ...


2

It's possible to init the computed property in init, like this. class TestProperty { var b = 0 var a: Int { get { return b + 1 } set { b = newValue - 1 } } init(a: Int) { self.a = a } } But one can just provide a default value for the stored property b, and retrieve a ...


0

It raises because when you call super without specifying arguments, it calls the parent method with the same arguments that the caller received. In your case, calling just super is the same as calling super(foo), and the Object class (the parent object of A) contains no initializer receiving a parameter. I believe you expect the behavior from this code: ...


0

When the class is loaded by Class Loader, the job of linker starts. Linker verifies the Java code, whether it is written as per specifications given in Java Language & JVM. If it found valid Java Code then it starts allocating memory for fields, methods, interfaces, etc. Create a reference to that memory locations. Once reference is assigned to memory ...


1

Step 2 is be the initialization step, right? No, It's called construction of array. The initialization of array means putting things into it that you are doing after step 2. Then what happens in step 1 "when the class is loaded"? when the class is loaded all static variables are initialized with their default values. In case of Object it's default ...


5

If you want to initialize it when the class is loaded, then you should use the static initializer: public class NewClass { static int[] arr; //Step 1 static { arr = new int[10]; //Step 2 for(int i= 0;i<10;i++){ arr[i] = i; } } }


4

Initializing a static member in the constructor defeats the purpose of static members, since they don't belong to any instance, and each new instance you'll create will override the value of your static array. You should either initialize the static variable when it's declared or in a static initialization block. static int[] arr = new int[10]; or ...


1

Here's an example of how to initialize the array in a static initializer block. Of course, it's not very interesting, since all the integers in the array are identical. class Abc { static int[][] arr; static { arr = new int[100][300]; for (int i=0;i<arr.length;i++) { for (int j=0;j<arr[i].length;j++) { ...


1

The ClassCastException is coming from line 11, where you cast the returned object from Arrays.asList() to ArrayList. The problem is that Arrays.asList() returns objects of type List (see http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html), and List is not a subtype of ArrayList. So to fix this, you can either change the values stored in your Map ...


1

You can add a static initializer block. You can see the documentation here.


1

Change- static final Map<String, ArrayList<String>> map1 = ImmutableMap.<String, ArrayList<String>>builder() to static final Map<String, List<String>> map1 = ImmutableMap.<String, List<String>>builder() Why?? Arrays.asList() returns a different ArrayList not java.util.List. The ArrayList returned is a ...


0

All the three initializations you posted are functionally equivalent to an empty string or uninitialized string. None of them will be advantageous over the others. And even if it has, the advantage would be so small that it won't matter at all. While individual views may differ, I feel initializing variables with empty/null value with declaration is a bad ...


1

There are option to group initializers and then run only certains of them (see this answer), but if this is a temporary situation, you have a lot of options: Just comment out the ones you don't need (if this is just a test on your machine) Add a if Rails.env.development? clause to those you don't want to run locally (if this is for all development ...


4

A string will be set to Nothing until you specify otherwise, so there is no need to initialise it like this: Dim s As String = Nothing because this is just the same as Dim s As String You may want to set it Nothing later on in your code but not at initialisation, vbNullString is a carry over from VB6 days and is functionally equivalent to Nothing A ...


-1

Dim str As String = "" ' <--This is "not best practice" Dim str2 As String = Nothing ' <--This is "not best practice" Dim str3 As String = vbNullString ' <--This is "not best practice" Dim str4 As String = String.Empty ' <--correct By default, strWords will be Nothing by default anyway. Rather than ensuring this value is never nothing by ...


1

The idea behind an IV is to use a distinct new random one for every encryption (with the same key). This is very important to ensure the the security of cipher-modes such as CTR or CBC which would not be secure at all without an IV. Also when using the same key to encrypt the same message twice it will result in two distinct ciphertexts (since the two IVs ...


2

You can simply create Object like this: void mainwindow::load() { value1.create(56); value2.create(72); } Or you can do it in the constructor without using load function: mainwindow::mainwindow() :value1(56), value2(72) { } in this case you need to write a constructor of objects objects::objects(int arg = 0) :n(arg) { }


0

You are right, building the whole application in the main is not the way to do it. In my opinion you should build a class that provides data let's say DataProvider that has methods for providing given data. As there are multiple ways of storing data, you can make this an interface/ abstract class depending on the common code. As your project can evolve and ...


0

You should use a map to hold your students, and use Long or String or any other immutable class as your key. I recommend using a Map because it's O(1) to access data from this kind of collection, against O(n) if you use, for instance, an ArrayList<Students>. private Map<Long, Student> students = new HashMap<>(); Then you should move your ...


0

Keep your data in arrays or some other data structure like String names = {"Jack Smith","John","Asley"}; int grades = {70,65,85}; //you can generate local or global array , its up to you int main() { for(int i=0;i<names.length;i++) business.load(names[i],grades[i]); } //Do your work in load method


0

If you are only going to access the students from the business class you could do the following business.addStudent(new Student("Jack Smith"), 70); business.addStudent(new Student("Jim Lucas"), 65); business.addStudent(new Student("Beck Barber"), 70); business.addStudent(new Student("Ann Walker"), 83); business.addStudent(new Student("Lucy Boxer"), 78);


0

A simple suggestion for: create a StudentFactory to encapsulate students instantiation, the facory method might looks like: public List createAllStudents(); And the same to Subject class.


0

Firstly, how about creating a method to do this so it is not in your main e.g. Class MyClass { public void main (String args[]) { myClass mc = new MyClass(); mc.loaddata (); } private void loadData () { } Now in your loadData method you could load this data from a CSV file maybe? See http://opencsv.sourceforge.net/


1

First of all, Shafik Yaghmour gave references to the Standard in his answer. That is the best, complete and authoritative answer. None the less, let me try to give you specific examples that should illustrate the aforementioned points. This code is safe, well-formed and meaningful: int *p = new int; // ie this is a local variable (ptr) that points ...


7

This is undefined behavior(UB) since you are accessing an indeterminate value, C++14 clearly makes this undefined behavior. We can see that new without initializer is default initialized, from the draft C++14 standard section 5.3.4 New paragraph 17 which says (emphasis mine going forward): If the new-initializer is omitted, the object is ...


2

It is possible that a computer has "trapping" values of int: invalid values, such as a checksum bit which raises a hardware exception when it doesn't match its expected state. In general, uninitialized values lead to undefined behavior. Initialize it first. Otherwise, no, there's nothing wrong or really unusual about dereferencing a new-expression. Here is ...


11

It’s undefined because you’re reading an object with an indeterminate value. The expression new int() uses zero-initialisation, guaranteeing a zero value, while new int (without parentheses) uses default-initialisation, giving you an indeterminate value. This is effectively the same as saying: int x; // not initialised cout << x << ...


0

Nope, there is no way to automatically initialize them. Possibly you'd find this cleaner? try: result = event.GetData() except Exception as e: result = (None, None, None) a, b, c = result Alternatively, you could wrap the events in a small helper class: class EventData(object): def __init__(self, event): try: result = ...


0

Here, 6 is non-designated initializer. So, this value is initialized to the member just after the previous designated initializer, that is the float just after char. In case you had two or more non-designated initializers in series, then the non-designated initializers would be initialized to the members in series from last designated initializer.


12

This is covered in the draft C99 standard section 6.7.8 Initialization, basically if the following initializer is not a designator then it will pick up with the next field after that designator, which for your examples would be f. We can look at paragraph 17 which says (emphasis mine): Each brace-enclosed initializer list has an associated current ...


6

In case of struct myStruct = {.f = 10.11, .c = 'a', 6}; the value 6 which is non-designated initializer will assign to the member just after the member initialized with designated initializer. So, in this case, member f is just after c and hence it will be initialized to 6. i still will be initialized to 0 by default.


1

It will make a difference, if the variable is declared final. If a final variable is immediately assigned at declaration with a compile-time constant, the variable will be a compile-time constant as well. This means, its value will be copied at compile time rather than read at runtime whenever the variable is accessed and it may appear at places, where only ...


2

The difference is syntactic. For most cases the first form is more readable and straight forward to work with. The second form can be more powerful as it separates declaration and initialization but given this exact example the compiler will generate exactly the same byte codes. This is because the compiler will place field initialisers and init blocks ...



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