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0

As lurker said, each assembler has its own syntax. db is used by nasm, for example. gas provides .byte, .string, .asciz and a bunch of other directives. See the manual. Your code could look like: sentence: .string "h"


0

You need to use an array so that you have a shot count for each cup. int countd; int[] shots = new int[CupsOfCoffee]; for (countd = 1; countd <= CupsOfCoffee; ++countd) { System.out.println("How many coffee shots in cup "+ countd); shots[countd - 1] = keyboard.nextInt(); } for (countd = 1; countd <= CupsOfCoffee; ++countd) { ...


0

I can see a couple of problems. Firstly, in the println statement on the last line, you're referring to shot rather than shots. Secondly, declaring shots outside the for loop is fine, but you're then redefining it inside the loop, hiding the other variable. To use an array, try something like: ... int[] shots = new int[CupsOfCoffee]; for (countd = 0; ...


3

"But this is not an option because I need to do some work on some_data before passing it to the Bar constructor." What about providing another function to "do some work on some_data": Foo (int some_data) : instance_of_Bar(baz(some_data)) {} int baz(int some_data) { // do some work return some_data; }


4

It's a horrible pattern. The object will be in an undefined state between its construction and your calling init. Also you have to think about making init thread safe, along with making init robust if called more than once. Also note that you can call a constructor from another one from c++11 onwards. So the argument that an init function eliminates ...


0

You can store properties by value even if you need non-default constructor to instantiate them. In the constructor of class B you'll need to explicitly instantiate the m_a via intialization list, e.g. B(int number):m_a(number){}. Using initialization functions to overcome this "problem" is really unnecessary here as the language supports this natively.


3

You're not obliged to use pointers to have class instances as attributes. Class B { public: explicit B(int i); // notice the explicit, btw A m_a; }; B::B(int i) : m_a(i) { // will call the constructor of "A" with "i" as argument } m_a will be destroyed when the instance of B is destroyed too. By adding an init method, you're defeating the ...


0

The backend need a config file added to a repertory inside that container before the app could work. Why don't you use VOLUME to mount that file to the container. Docker compose supports the volumes: as standard syntax. Alternatively, you can locally build that image, with that file via Dockerfile and push that image to hub. Then you can directly use ...


0

Like this: var myVariable = RecordedAudio() Though, given that filePathUrl and title are implicitly unwrapped optionals (which I'd have to recommend against), you might want to create a better initialization method: init(filePathUrl: NSURL, title: String) { self.filePathUrl = filePathUrl self.title = title } And then use that initialization. ...


0

Use std::call_once, it was literally invented to solve this problem. From memory you don't need thread-safe statics for file-scope statics as they must be initialized prior to main being entered, so there's no chance of anybody having any threads in your code before it's initialized. // Place the func_flag at file scope. static std::once_flag my_func_flag; ...


0

The first question is whether you want to share the value between different thread or whether it is ok for each thread to store its own value. If you want to share the value across threads you will need to protect all access with a Critical Section. If you are ok with different threads holding different values, you will need to look at thread local ...


0

You should allocate enough space for descriptors before calling it. There's only a empty container by vector <vector <float> > descriptors;, it will crash if you trying to access its elements, i.e. descriptors[0], because descriptors.size()==0 currently. You can simply change vector <vector <float> > descriptors; to vector ...


0

Just an addition with a little more explanation: Your properties field initializes earlier than loadedProps field here. null is a field's value before initialization - that's why you get it. In def case it's just a method call instead of accessing some field, so everything is fine (as method's code may be called several times - no initialization here). See, ...


2

Don't use the include guard die: it's the same as the class name. The preprocessor will substitute empty text every time it sees the string die. The compiler will see class { private: etc., which is not compilable. Use something like #define included_die_hpp instead.


0

A little comment on @Slava's #1 answer, from doc of stateHelper: In 1.2.0 setNestedState was deprecated in favour of .state, and chaining was added. This makes it easier to switch between $stateProvider and stateHelperProvider.


0

If you want to have access to the slider, you can do something like this: ofIntSlider motorSpeed; panel.add(motorSpeed.setup("motor_speed", 0, 0, 100));


2

A constant that's an optional needs to be assigned a value during the init process. That value can be nil, or some other value. Once assigned it is stuck in that value. A nil is like a "this property intentionally left blank" indicator, written in permanent ink. Say you have a class that gets filled with response data from a network request. Some of the ...


2

If you're putting a literal and you make it optional, the optional part is useless because you know that number is going to be 1 let number: Int? = 1 However, if you want to make a constant copy of another object, where you don't know if the source is going to be nil or not, it is. var array = ["hello"] let string: String? = array[1] // string is nil, ...


3

I made a couple of modifications to the code so it would compile although it does change the meaning some. class SliderControllerView: UIView { // Converted "let" to "var" private var type: ControlType! private var label: UILabel! private var slider: UISlider! private weak var delegate: SliderControllerDelegate? private var ...


0

On the other hand, when i init the map from a window.onload-event - everything inits perfect. You'll want to use onload. The gist of it is that events like pagecreate and ready (also known as $(function(){}) fire when the page's content is loaded but the page isn't laid out - your browser doesn't know yet what size the map will be. Leaflet needs that ...


1

You are correct, the __init__ under the AndGate class is not necessary. (Tested in python with this specific example and a new class to verify). It has to do with how inheritance in python is handled: the __init__ function of the parent class is automatically called.


-1

C++ is a strong-typed language. You really need to typecast the rvalue into the lvalue. Here in your case it should be like: guiBaseObject *item = (guiBaseObject *)panel.addSlider("motor_speed", 0, 0, 100); otherwise it will give a compile time error.


4

A variable is defined when it is first assigned to a value. Typically, this follows the convention of variable = value. It doesn't become defined until this point, and is defined from this point on until the end of its scope. If a variable hasn't been defined, attempting to read its data will raise a NameError. On the other hand, [], 0, and None are ...


1

I have come across this issue recently as well on my MacOS machine (everything works fine on my Linux machine). I haven't yet gone deep into it but as a workaround you can place the require_relative('.') string at the beginning of the /home/roger/.gem/ruby/gems/fog-aws-0.1.2/lib/fog/aws/auto_scaling.rb.


0

Fancy way to put @rdhs answer in a function: Function arrayZero(size As Integer) arrayZero = Evaluate("=IF(ISERROR(Transpose(A1:A" & size & ")), 0, 0)") End Function And use like this: myArray = arrayZero(15)


1

In my humble opinion, the simplest way to ensure zero-initialization is to add a layer of abstraction: class MyClass { struct { int a; int b; int c; } data{}; public: MyClass(int a) : data{a} {} }; Moving the data members into a struct lets us use value-initialization to perform zero-initialization. Of course, it is ...


0

I found out a solution (event vagrant-mounted): cat << EOF > /etc/init/supervisor-launcher.conf description "Supervisor Launcher" start on vagrant-mounted script /usr/sbin/service supervisor start end script EOF


-1

There are ways to mimic inheritance in Go if this is what you are looking for, see section "Inheritance" in this blog


4

When you partially initialise the struct, those parts not specifically initialised are set to 0. So the strings do have a terminating 0 and so strlen() returns the correct value. #include <stdio.h> #include <string.h> int main(){ int i; char s[10] = {'a', 'b', 'c'}; for (i=0; i<10; i++) printf("%d ", s[i]); ...


24

TL;DR Answer: No, this is well-defined behaviour. Explanation: As per the C11 standard document, chapter 6.7.9, initalization, If there are fewer initializers in a brace-enclosed list than there are elements or members of an aggregate, or fewer characters in a string literal used to initialize an array of known size than there are elements in the ...


8

The reason is that your months are indeed nul-terminated. If you have an array with 10 elements, and have an initialiser for 3 elements, then the rest is filled with 0's. If you had a month with 11 characters, the compiler would tell you. If you had a month with 10 characters, you would be in trouble because there would be no nul-termination, and the ...


0

Leetcode doesn't give exact code. It will have syntax errors or compilation erros. You have to fix them to make it work. In this case, following are the issues, int* numbers=new int[k]; //not int* numbers=new int(k); Another thing is that bool is a keyword, that is used to give true or false for variables. You have to use another variable.


1

int* numbers=new int[k];////allocates an array of k adjacent integers. (undefined values) You are allocating for an array. Check the notations. Also you are using a keyword as a variable.(bool). What have you done? int *numbers=new int(k);////allocates an integer, set to k. (same syntax as constructors)


1

In the code you have posted, you have not initialized the Mat to any size or type. However, there is a very easy way to initialize a matrix with zeros. Initialising Matrix values to 0: cv::Mat colorHist = cv::Mat::zeros(1, histSize, CV_32F); This will produce a row vector (1-dimensional) with histSize columns, CV_32F simply refers to the data type the ...


1

You may try something like that: 1 - First you create a float array which is your 1-D data structure: float arr[10] = {0}; // initialize it to all 0`s 2 - Now create your opencv matrix as follows and fill the array into it: cv::Mat colorHist = cv::Mat(2, 4, CV_32F, arr); 3 - if you want to access individual entries use something like: for(int i=0; ...


0

Aside from other logical errors, such as while(!is.eof()), your code compiles if you replace void main() with int main() (as it should be, according to the C++ standard), and remove return; from the last line of main(). Unless you want to return something different from 0 (to signal to the OS an abnormal program error), there is no need for return 0; in ...


0

Did you try this?. NSError *error = nil; NSData *data = [NSData dataWithContentsOfFile:chapterPath options:NSDataReadingUncached error:&error]; NSAttributedString *attributedString = [[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithData: data options:@{ NSDocumentTypeDocumentAttribute: NSHTMLTextDocumentType } documentAttributes:&attributes error:nil];


1

There are different ways to that params get passed in functions. The usually way that most beginners start with is pass by value. The other way is pass by reference. In passing by reference, the object itself is pass in, not a copy as is with pass by value. That means any changes will affect the param and remain, even after it is called. All objects in java ...


0

As answered here, create a class function. I've added the full code. class MyClass { var x: String var y: String class func createY(x: String) -> String { return x + "_test" // this computation could be much more complex } init(x: String) { self.x = x self.y = MyClass.createY(x) } }


1

When you call this line: super.init(style: UITableViewCellStyle, reuseIdentifier: String?) you need to supply an actual cell style and an actual reuse identifier. You code at the moment is written as if this line is a function definition, not a function invocation. Change it to something like: super.init(style: .Default, reuseIdentifier: "SettingCell") ...


1

The method formal name is not of high value, considering how limited it's scope is. And yet there should still be motivation to be able to instantly distinguish these items 'origins' at a glance. It has become my practice to both a) prefix my data attribute names with 'm_', AND b) prefix the method / function parameter names with 'a_' or 'an_', ...


3

By simply writing them. The rules of the language prevent problems. struct Foo { Foo(int x) : x(x) {}; int x; }; Outside the (), only the data member is in scope; inside, the function argument hides the member just as it would in a normal function body: int x = 2; void foo(int x) { // any access to `x` means the argument } This is one of many ...


1

The simplest way is to use a mem-initializer list. For example class A { private: int data; public: A( int data ) : data( data ) {} }; If you want to use the data member within the constructor's body then there are two approaches to distinguish the data member and the parameter class A { private: int data; public: A( int data ) : data( data ) ...


2

If you use an initializer list, you can simply use the same name and the compiler will understand what you mean. Example: Book::Book(std::string title, int year) : title(title), year(year) {}


2

You just initialize them in the initialization list: struct foo { foo(int bar) : bar(bar) {} private: int bar; }; Note that the initialization list is the only way to explicitly initialize a member in a constructor. Once you're in the body of the constructor, the member has already been initialized. As an aside, C++ allows you to initialize a member ...


2

You are looking for sub2ind. So the desired output could be achieved with - O = M(sub2ind(size(M),S,1:numel(S))) Or for performance, you can use a raw version of sub2ind - O = M([0:numel(S)-1]*size(M,1) + S)


1

I copied your code into my Swift 2.1 project and it runs fine. class GameViewController: UIViewController { override func viewDidLoad() { super.viewDidLoad() // Configure the view. let skView = self.view as! SKView let scene:SKScene = GameScene.init(size: skView.bounds.size) skView.ignoresSiblingOrder = true ...


0

There is no difference code wise except the fact that in second case you are not initialising the list that is why it is not getting initialized. Change like this, then it will work A obj = new A(); l = new ArrayList<String>(); //This is called initialization. obj.myList = l; It will work.


0

No difference, in first you initialize it with constructor, in second you initialize it later. But instead of this: myList = new ArrayList<String>(); myList = list; I prefer this: myList = new ArrayList<String>(list);


0

I have found a fix class PageOne (tk.Frame): def __init__ (self, parent, controller): tk.Frame.__init__(self, parent) lbl = tk.Label(self, text="Page 1") lbl.pack() button = tk.Button(self, text="switch", command=lambda: self.launch(controller) button.pack() def launch (self, cont): ...



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