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The __volatile__ modifier on an __asm__ block forces the compiler's optimizer to execute the code as-is. Without it, the optimizer may think it can be either removed outright, or lifted out of a loop and cached. This is useful for the rdtsc instruction like so: __asm__ __volatile__("rdtsc": "=a" (a), "=d" (d) ) This takes no dependencies, so the compiler ...


0

The __asm__ attribute specifies the name to be used in assembler code for the function or variable. The __volatile__ qualifier, generally used in Real-Time-Computing of embedded systems, addresses a problem with compiler tests of the status register for the ERROR or READY bit causing problems during optimization. volitile was introduced as a way of telling ...


3

asm is for including native Assembly code into the C source code. E.g. int a = 2; asm("mov a, 3"); printf("%i", a); // will print 3 Compilers have different variants of it. __asm__ should be synonymous, maybe with some compiler-specific differences. volatile means the variable can be modified from outside (aka not by the C program). For instance when ...


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Obviously I don't know your actual intent, but I question the assumption that "the real scenario where I want to use this concept may result in some advantage." It may not be 100% accurate to say that humans can no longer write efficient assembler for i386, but it's nearly true. If you are familiar with pipelining and out-of-order execution, you already ...


6

The first thing to do is to stop passing arrays by value. For large arrays this will be inefficient. Instead of pass by value, declare the parameter to be const. However, since your function is named sortArray, and since your code attempts to modify the array, it would appear more likely that you need a var parameter to get the desired semantics. ...


3

In long mode (64-bit code) the sgdt instruction stores a 64-bit "linear address of GDT" and a 16-bit "GDT limit". This takes up 10 bytes and will not fit in a UINT64. For the first version of your code, you'd be trashing the stack. Mostly likely corrupting the function's return address and causing a crash. For the second version of your code, you'd still ...


1

Don't use a string literal for the destination - string literals are commonly stored in a read-only section, i.e. they are effectively const. Change: char* dest_main = "Hello_des"; to: char dest_main[] = "Hello_des"; or just: char dest_main[16];


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The problem is that you're trying to overwrite a read-only section of memory, where the string literal "Hello_des" is stored. Don't do that. The solution is to make the destination an array, which is writable: char dest_main[32] = "Hello_des"; Of course, one wonders why you wrote this code, it's very pointless to initialize a string and then immediately ...



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