Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Your first example is the most correct and has following errors: It uses 32 bit registers instead of 64 bit. 3 registers are changed which are not specified as outputs or clobbers. EAX is loaded with source address, not the size. dst is declared to be an output, when it should be an input. The arguments for the add instruction are the wrong way round, in ...


1

From the comments it sounds a lot like you want to use a reinterpret cast here. Essentially what this does is to tell the compiler to treat the sequence of bits as if it were of the type that it was casted to but it doesn't do any attempt to convert the value. uint64_t raw = 0x3FA999999999999A; double x = reinterpret_cast<double&>(raw); See ...


0

You could probably make the compiler's output for your C version much more efficient by loading vidmem into a local variable before the stores. As it is, it can't assume that the stores don't alias vidmem, so it reloads the pointer before every byte store. Hrm, that does let gcc 4.9.2 avoid reloading vidmem, but it still generates some nasty code. clang ...


0

Consider if the asm contained add %[result], %[ina], %[inb]. There's no harm whatsoever in allocating r2 for both result and ina there. Since GCC doesn't go analysing the contents of the asm statement, its default assumption is that it contains a single instruction like that, so if yours is more complicated then you need to say so in order for things to work ...


0

Those are local labels (numbers followed by a colon). When they are later referenced, the b (as in jmp 1b) means to refer to the nearest local label of that number going backwards. An f would look for a matching local label later (forwards) in the code. That code declares an exception table, when an exception occurs executing the wrmsr instruction, the ...


0

rptr is declared as an output when it should be an input and "memory" is missing from the clobber list. Alternatively you may put the arrays in structs and use the structs (rather than pointers) as arguments to the asm statement.


0

Found the problem! It was in a lot of places, but the major one was vidmem. I assumed it would pass the address, but it was causing an error. After referring to it as a dword, it worked perfectly. I also had to change the other constraints to "m", and I finally got this result (after some optimization): __asm( "movl %0, %%edi;" "movl %k1, %%ebx;" ...


0

To wrap it all up: inline assembly is not the part of C standard, it's an extension so portability (even across compilers on the same hardware) is not guaranteed. one good way to write it is following: #include <stdio.h> #include <stdint.h> #define inf_int uint64_t int main(int argc, char *argv[]){ inf_int zero = 0; inf_int one = 1; ...


5

Your first code does not specify any inputs to the asm statements so the chosen register has an undefined value (which in this case was initially the return value of printf). The second example repeats the error of using an undefined value and adds further undefined behaviour by overwriting the input register with the output. You could use two registers ...


2

r/m64, xmm is not listed as a valid operand combination for the MOVD instruction in Intel's Software Developers' Manual. However, the following two forms are supported: MOVD r/m32, xmm SSE2 Move doubleword from xmm register to r/m32. MOVQ r/m64, xmm SSE2 Move quadword from xmm register to r/m64. Which makes me suspect that the MOVD instruction needs to ...


1

First, ARM does not have rotate left (ROL), you need to emulate that through ROR. Second, the M constraint for some reason accepts 0 to 32, but ROL only accepts 0 to 31 when dealing with immediates. Third, the g constraint is too generic because it also allows memory operands that ROR does not accept. Better use r instead. This is what I came up with: // ...


3

You should use the correct sized type for operands rather trying to force the register to the correct size using an operand modifer. In this case this also will truncate the immediate operand to the correct size if it's too big. Also as David Wohlferd said, you don't want to make the asm statement volatile as this would prevent the optimizer from removing it ...


3

There is not "correct" way to multi-line assembly vs inline. Just whatever is the most readable. Exemple : GMP use differents asm code style for the same bswap function /* bswap is available on i486 and up and is fast. A combination rorw $8 / roll $16 / rorw $8 is used in glibc for plain i386 (and in the linux kernel with xchgb instead of rorw), ...


1

If you want to use C variables in GCC inline assembly, you have to make use of the Extended ASM syntax, e.g.: volatile int temp = 0; asm("movl %0,%%esp" : /* No outputs. */ : "rm" (temp) );


1

You have to use extended assembler to pass C operands to the assembler: Read the manual. (Note: as you did not specify which version you are using, I just picked one). Do not forget to add registers used in the assembler into the clobber list. You should also make the assembler asm volatile. Depending on your execution environment, it might be a very bad ...



Top 50 recent answers are included