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37

However, starting in Java SE 8, a local class can access local variables and parameters of the enclosing block that are final or effectively final. A variable or parameter whose value is never changed after it is initialized is effectively final. For example, suppose that the variable numberLength is not declared final, and you add the highlighted ...


22

It's definitely not a bug, it is entirely because of the anonymous inner class inheriting from HashMap: new HashMap<String, Entry>() {{ for (final Entry entry : entries) { put(entry.getName(), entry); } }}; It's a side-effect of using double-brace initialization. What you're doing is creating an anonymous class that extends HashMap ...


19

This is called "leaking this". Here you have the code public class Test { // this is guaranteed to be initialized after the constructor private final int val; public Test(int v) { new Thread(new Runnable() { @Override public void run() { System.out.println("Val is " + val); } }).start(); this.val = v; } } Guess ...


17

I find the simplest way to explain "effectively final" is to imagine adding the final modifier to a variable declaration. If, with this change, the program continues to behave in the same way, both at compile time and at run time, then that variable is effectively final.


10

Think about the single-threaded situation first: Whenever you create an object via new, its constructor is called which (hopefully) initializes the fields of the new object before a reference to this object is returned. That is, from the point of view of the caller, this new is almost like an atomic operation: Before calling new, there is no object. After ...


10

Even after smacking my head into the bytecode for almost an hour, I've not been able to come to a reasonable conclusion as to why this is happening. Surprisingly, changing your method to this: private void runTest() { Worker worker = new Worker(); run(() -> worker.print(field -> new SomeClass(field))); Function<Object, Object> ...


9

The reason for this is the type parameter on the Util class and the inner class Pair is non-static. Because Pair is a non-static inner class, it can use the T type parameter of Util (even though in this case it does not). Therefore when Pair is used it is necessary to specify a T, either by accessing it within the context of a Util instance (where the T is ...


8

You can't define a constructor for an anonymous class (part of the language specification), but you can control which super constructor is called by simply providing arguments to the new call: MyBob my = new MyBob("foo") { // super(String) is called // you can add fields, methods, instance blocks, etc, but not constructors }


8

You can declare an array of innerclass objects like this. class util { Outerclass.innerclass[] inner = new Outerclass.innerclass[10]; } And to instantiate them you can do something like this inside the util class. void test() { Outerclass outer = new Outerclass(); inner[0] = outer.new innerclass(); }


8

No. From the JLS section on class declarations: It is a compile-time error if a class has the same simple name as any of its enclosing classes or interfaces. Note: I somehow managed to miss this on my first pass through looking for an explicit rule. Check the edit history if you want the tortuous way I got here.


7

I want to create a fool-proof .... that is always harder than you think. manager.operateOn(state); If you know it has to the manager associated with the state, I wouldn't provide the manager. Try instead state.operate(); The state knows which manager it should be using. This way there is no way to specify an incorrect manager because you can't ...


7

I think you need: new SecondClass().new InnerClass()


7

Because you are trying to access a non-static inner-class from a static method. The 1st solution will be to change your inner-class B to static: public class A{ private static class B{ public B(){ System.out.println("class B"); } } public static void main(String[] args){ A a = new A(); B b = new B(); } a static inner-class is ...


7

This requirement can be satisfied without inheritance or passing the object; we can get the name of the class that calls the constructor from within the body of the constructor by examining the stack. public class A { private string _createdBy; public void SomeAction() { Console.WriteLine("I was declared in class [{0}]", _createdBy); ...


7

Inner is an inner class. It can only be created when there is an enclosing instance of the class containing the Inner class definition. However, you've created a static nested class, Nested, which extends from this class. When you try to invoke the super constructor public Nested(String str, Boolean b , Number nm) { super("2",true); } it will ...


6

As Sotirios has said, your nested (not-inner) class doesn't implicitly have an instance of Outer to effectively provide to the Inner. You can get round this, however, by explicitly specifying it before the .super part: public Nested(String str, Boolean b, Number nm) { new Outer(10).super("2", true); } Or even accept it as a parameter: public ...


6

When to use inner classes is as much art as it is science. Basically look at how big your code file is getting and how big each class if. If a class is big and complicated it should probably go in its own file. If it's small (for example a single function implementation of a listener interface) and unliekly to be re-used elsewhere then it should probably be ...


6

There is no implicit sub-type relationship: your observation/conclusion is correct. (In the first case, super has the type of "Object" and "Object.fruit" does indeed not exist.) An inner class (as opposed to "static nested class"), as shown, must be created within context of an instance of the outer class; but this is orthogonal to sub-typing. To access a ...


6

According to the docs: A variable or parameter whose value is never changed after it is initialized is effectively final. Basically, if the compiler finds a variable does not appear in assignments outside of its initialization, then the variable is considered effectively final. For example, consider some class: public class Foo { int bar = 1; ...


6

A a = new A(); B b = a.new B(); can solve your problem You used private inner class.How can you get instance outside the A class? public class JustForShow { public class JustTry{ public JustTry() { System.out.println("Initialized"); } } public static void main(String[] args) { JustForShow jfs = new ...


6

An instance is never nullified. That is not a concept that exists in Java. What is nullified is the variable, the reference. The A instance, however, still has a valid reference to its enclosing instance and can therefore use it.


5

It is used when you want to refer to an instance method or variable in the same object, for example in constructors, in order to distinguish the parameters from the instance variables class MyClass { private int valueA; private int valueB; public MyClass(int valueA, int valueB) { this.valueA = valueA; this.valueB = valueB; ...


5

In general, inner classes can access non final members of their enclosing instance. They can't access non-final local variables declared in the scope in which they are declared. That said, your anonymous classes are defined within a static method, so they don't have an enclosing instance, but they are accessing a static class member, so that's also valid. ...


5

problem: Thread t1=(Thread)r1; Thread t2=(Thread)r2; r1 and r2 are a Runnable not a Thread upon casting it it will generate ClassCastException. Instead instantiate the Thread and pass the runnable instance to the constructor. sample Thread t1=new Thread(r1); Thread t2=new Thread(r2);


5

You can't use System.out.println() in class level. class finish{ System.out.println("FINISH"); // you can't do this. } You can use inside a method. class finish{ public void myMethod(){ System.out.println("FINISH"); // now this is inside a method. } } You can use following way too. Put inside a non-static initializers or static block class ...


5

At the point where you attempt to define S::S2, the type S is still an incomplete type, since its definition hasn't been completed yet. And class data members must have a complete type. You can easily fix it like this: struct S { struct S2; // declare only, don't define // ... }; struct S::S2 { S s; // now "S" is a complete type }; ...


5

The local variables of the method live on the stack, and exist only for the lifetime of the method. You already know that the scope of a local variable is limited to the method the variable is declared in. When the method ends, the stack frame is blown away and the variable is history. But even after the method completes, the inner class object created ...


5

You can call the method directly using simple name: void fooBarMethod() { otherMethod(); // compiles } This will fail, the moment you define another method with the name otherMethod() in the new FooBar() anonymous class. Bar.this wouldn't really work, because that's an anonymous class there, whose name is given at compile time. It will get a name ...


5

I believe this is simple scoping. If you replace your inner classes with simple System.out.println() calls, public class A { void method() { System.out.print(j);//This is illegal! final int j = 10; System.out.print(j);//This is legal! } } you'll find you get the same message. The scope of local variables starts where they are declared and ...


5

You defined SimpleCircle as an inner class, that is an unnecessary complication here and it is what is keeping this from compiling. Move the SimpleCircle class declaration out from inside the declaration of clzzz and you'll fix the problem. Alternatively you could make SimpleCircle a static inner class by adding the static keyword. If you keep this as a ...



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