Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

38

I guess you expected the local class method to be invoked. That didn't happen, because you're using new A() outside the scope of local class. So, it accesses the next closer candidate in scope, that would be the inner class. From JLS §6.3: The scope of a local class declaration immediately enclosed by a block (ยง14.2) is the rest of the immediately ...


38

I'm studying a little of C++ and now I'm fighting against it's similitudes with Java. First of all be aware that C++ nested classes are similar to what in Java you call static nested classes. There isn't anything in C++ syntax to reproduce Java nested classes. I discover that private attributes of "container" class are not visible by inner class... ...


27

I guess you are compiling with Java 8. Here your jtf variable is effectively final, so it compiles fine. A variable is effectively final if its value is never changed after you initialized it. See also Local Classes: However, starting in Java SE 8, a local class can access local variables and parameters of the enclosing block that are final or ...


23

It's definitely not a bug, it is entirely because of the anonymous inner class inheriting from HashMap: new HashMap<String, Entry>() {{ for (final Entry entry : entries) { put(entry.getName(), entry); } }}; It's a side-effect of using double-brace initialization. What you're doing is creating an anonymous class that extends HashMap ...


17

Inner is not in scope for the class declaration of Outer. It's not a known type name when used in the extends clause. Use a qualified reference: class Outer extends Abstract<Outer.Inner> Or import it: import com.example.Outer.Inner; From the specification, regarding Scope: The scope of a declaration of a member m declared in or inherited by a ...


14

You are getting the output "middle" because of the order in which you have your code. Since the method-scoped class A occurs after your call to new A(), you are getting the output "middle". If you switch around the order as follows, you will get the output "inner": void go() { class A { void m() { System.out.println("inner"); ...


14

Java 8 added the ability to access "effectively final" variables. The final keyword is no longer required as long as a variable is never changed after it is initialized.


11

Since foo is private, it can be accessed only through getFoo(), right? In this case, Outer has access to it too, because Inner is a member of Outer. 6.6.1 says: [If] the member or constructor is declared private, [then] access is permitted if and only if it occurs within the body of the top level class that encloses the declaration of the member or ...


8

Because you are trying to access a non-static inner-class from a static method. The 1st solution will be to change your inner-class B to static: public class A{ private static class B { public B() { System.out.println("class B"); } } public static void main(String[] args){ A a = new A(); B b = new ...


8

Java 8 implicitly makes message final because it is never modified. Try modifying it anywhere in your code and you will get a compilation error (because this removes the implicit final). This is called effectively final. Quoting From the docs: However, starting in Java SE 8, a local class can access local variables and parameters of the enclosing block ...


7

I think you need: new SecondClass().new InnerClass()


7

This requirement can be satisfied without inheritance or passing the object; we can get the name of the class that calls the constructor from within the body of the constructor by examining the stack. public class A { private string _createdBy; public void SomeAction() { Console.WriteLine("I was declared in class [{0}]", _createdBy); ...


7

You can use Abstrct<Outer.Inner> making the type unambiguous and valid.


7

The reason inner doesn't get printed is (6.3): The scope of a local class declaration immediately enclosed by a block is the rest of the immediately enclosing block, including its own class declaration. (A class declared inside a method is called a local class.) So A can't refer to the local class, because the expression new A() happens before its ...


6

An instance is never nullified. That is not a concept that exists in Java. What is nullified is the variable, the reference. The A instance, however, still has a valid reference to its enclosing instance and can therefore use it.


6

A a = new A(); B b = a.new B(); can solve your problem You used private inner class.How can you get instance outside the A class? public class JustForShow { public class JustTry{ public JustTry() { System.out.println("Initialized"); } } public static void main(String[] args) { JustForShow jfs = new ...


6

First, let's figure out the reason why Java thinks that new Point[3] creates a generic array, while Point appears to be a non-generic class. This happens because Point is a non-static class, meaning that it has a hidden reference to Foo<T> embedded by the compiler. The class looks like this to Java: class Foo$Point<T> { Foo<T> ...


6

Why do I need to pass OuterA object reference to SubclassC constructor for the .java file to compile? Because SubclassC extends the definition of the InnerA class. Meanwhile, InnerA class is bound to OuterA (i.e. all the instances of InnerA will be bound to a corresponding instance of OuterA). Therefore, to obtain an instance of SubclassC, you need an ...


6

In other words, I suppose the question is, can an outer classes type parameters be passed to an inner classes generic type declarations? No. There is no relationship (like inheritance or as a field) between the outer and the inner static class. You can create an object of the inner static class without any dependency on the outer class like in your ...


6

First, let's make it simpler - this has nothing to do with Android directly, and you don't need your A class at all. Here's what you want: class Outer { abstract class Inner { } } class Child extends Outer.Inner { } That doesn't compile, because when you create an instance of Child you need to provide an instance of Outer to the Inner ...


5

It is used when you want to refer to an instance method or variable in the same object, for example in constructors, in order to distinguish the parameters from the instance variables class MyClass { private int valueA; private int valueB; public MyClass(int valueA, int valueB) { this.valueA = valueA; this.valueB = valueB; ...


5

You can't use System.out.println() in class level. class finish{ System.out.println("FINISH"); // you can't do this. } You can use inside a method. class finish{ public void myMethod(){ System.out.println("FINISH"); // now this is inside a method. } } You can use following way too. Put inside a non-static initializers or static block class ...


5

Java 8 (and Lambdas) introduce the effectively final term: even though you didn't delcare it final with the final keyword, if it is not modified, it is as good as final. Quoting from Oracle Tutorial: Local Classes: However, starting in Java SE 8, a local class can access local variables and parameters of the enclosing block that are final or effectively ...


5

Although you've named it InnerClass, it is not an inner class. It is simply a static nested class. An instance of such a class has no reference to any instance of the enclosing class. What's more, you're referencing a static field of the enclosing class. There is absolutely no reference to any instance of OuterClass. Nothing in your InnerClass can ...


5

You have two types with the same name. Inner classes share type variables that are declared in their outer class. So when you have public class MyIterator<T> implements Iterator<T> // ^^^ The new type declaration <T> shadows the outer one. private node<T> current = getheadsent(); // ^^^^^^^ ...


5

ClassOuter.DataInner value = outerObj.new ClassOuter.DataInner(); This syntax applies to inner classes (i.e. non static nested classes). If that's what you want, remove the static keyword from public static class DataInner. EDIT : Also change ClassOuter.DataInner value = outerObj.new ClassOuter.DataInner(); to ClassOuter.DataInner value = ...


5

An inner class contains a hidden reference to its outer class instance. That hidden reference keeps the outer class instance alive if there are no other references to it. To see this in action, take this source code and compile it: public class Outer { public class Inner { } } Now use the java class inspection tool javap to see the hidden ...


5

This is not a shadowing. There is only one type parameter int your code, the T parameter. So inner and outer T are the same type parameters. You can of course have more type parameters. public class NestedGeneric<OUTER_TYPE> { private static class InnerGeneric<INNER_TYPE> { public INNER_TYPE innerGenericField; } public ...


5

It provides another good encapsulation technique. Placing one class entirely within the namespace of another class reduces its visibility to other parts of your code base. This helps achieve scalability and reduces your maintenance burden. Function objects are often coded in such a manner.


4

You should make one argument constructor to DownloadDataFromServer class and pass Context as argument like Context mCon; public DownloadDataFromServer(Context con){ this.mCon=con; } and used this mCon context to anywhere in your DownloadDataFromServer like so builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(mCon); and at last called DownloadDataFromServer ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible