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0

But there is direct method in vector to find max value public class Main { public static void main(String[] args) { Vector<Double> v = new Vector<Double>(); v.add(new Double("3.0")); v.add(new Double("4.0")); Object obj = Collections.max(v); System.out.println(obj); } }


0

Use an auxiliary method which takes an index parameter and your max/min object. The code should be self explanatory: public MinMaxObject getMinMax(Vector<Double> vector) { MinMaxObject minMax = new MinMaxObject(); getMinMaxAux(vector, minMax, 0); return minMax; } public void getMinMaxAux(Vector<Double> vector, MinMaxObject minMax, ...


3

Unless it is a specific requirement to use Vector, DON'T, and if it is, tell teacher to update assignment to something newer than 1998. Vector was replaced by ArrayList back in Java 1.2 in 1998, and javadoc says: Unlike the new collection implementations, Vector is synchronized. If a thread-safe implementation is not needed, it is recommended to use ...


0

You can recursively get the min of a vector with code like: static double min(Vector<Double> v, int index) { if (index == v.size() - 1) { return v.get(index); } double val = min(v, index + 1); if (v.get(index) < val) { return v.get(index); } else { return val; } } You can find the max recursively ...


0

Your code will not compile because a is out of scope. You should write something like this: class A { int a; class B { public void foo() { int j = new A().a; } } } or class A { static int a; class B { public void foo() { int j = a; } } }


12

"Nested types are classified as static members" Is a nested type really a static type with all methods implicitly static? No - the definition of the Type is a static member, but the type itself is not static. When it says Note that constants and nested types are classified as static members. it means you can create an instance of a nested class ...


0

Consider following example : public class OuterClass { private AnonymousInnerClass anonymousInnerClass = new AnonymousInnerClass() { @Override protected void printAboutme() { System.out.println("AnonymousInnerClass.printAboutMe........."); Class clazz = this.getClass(); Field[] fields = clazz.getDeclaredFields(); ...


0

anonymous inner classes are never static (they can't declare static methods or non final static fields),but if they're defined in a static context (static method or static field) they behave as static in the sense that they can't access non-static (i.e. instance) members of the enclosing class (like everything else from a static context)


2

I have used Async task class as single class. And for every Webservice call i have used unique IntentFilter to Broadcast response. Put that Broadcast receiver in every class. You have perfect solution. Its working well.


0

I believe that what is happening is that your opOptionsItemSelected() method is executing these lines of code: //noinspection SimplifiableIfStatement if (id == R.id.action_add) { showTitleDialog(); showURLDialog(); showNoteDialog(); addBookmark(); return true; } You seem to expect that the app will wait until after the dialogs are ...


2

Change String name; to final String[] name = new String[1];, name=qName; to name[0]=qName; and return name; to return name[0];. That creates an array where the result is stored in and retrieved from. By storing the result in an array lets us make the "name" variable final and thus the compiler happy.


0

Already enough information from +Joachim Sauer, I am just adding some extra details. You can define inner enum only if your inner class is static nested inner class. See below private static class DbResource { public enum DB { MERGE_FROM, MERGE_TO, MAIN; } }


2

Technically, as far as the compiler is concerned, the layout of the base (X) does not need to be known until the template (X) is instanciated. And the template (X) may not be istantiated before it is fully defined. At which point, it's layout is known. Simplest way to get an error from your template is to try istantiate Y inside X: template<typename ...


9

To answer the basic question: You get a warning because the template isn't yet instantiated, so it doesn't bother anyone. The way to fix this, in both cases, would be to define X::Y at the point in which X's layout is already known, and thus Y's layout can be properly deduced. You could do: struct X { struct Y; } struct X::Y {};


2

IMO, you can make a function to build a array of objets with number objects: public ArrayList getNumbers(){ ArrayList array = new ArrayList(); array.add(trackID()); array.add(trackValidity()); ... return array; } Remember to cast the object when u get it from the array, for example at pos 0 (trackID) is an int so when you get it from ...


2

Like you normally declare arrays, for example: Track[] track = new Track[42]; track[0] = new Track(); Or as full working example: public class ObjectArray { Track[] track; public static void main(String[] args){ ObjectArray tester = new ObjectArray(); tester.setIt(); tester.getIt(); } public void setIt(){ ...


3

This might be a bug. Using gcc.godbolt.org and running #include <iostream> class A { friend class B; friend class C; private: class NiceNestedClass { }; }; class C { void a() { A::NiceNestedClass works; } }; class B : A::NiceNestedClass{ }; int main(){ } Works with every version of clang, ICC and on gcc 4.9.2 or higher. ...


5

This is a known gcc bug that was reported back in 2013 https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=59482 Your code is correct and should compile with newer versions of gcc (fixed on gcc4.9 and later). On my side (gcc5.3) it works just fine.


3

Modify the Api constructor, and pass url to the URL constructor after you initialize url (and as pointed out by @Jonk in the comments, it should be this.url). Something like, URL url; Checks checks; // <-- url is null. public Api(URL url){ this.url = new URL(url+"/api"); checks = new Checks(this.url); // <-- now url is initialized. }


1

It was decided that the lack of access of nested classes was a mistake in the Standard, and subsequently rectified. Now nested classes enjoy the same levels of access as all members, namely total access.


2

Type name NestedBase is a private member of the class. class Base { private: class NestedBase { public: void Do() {} }; //... So you can not explicitly access it outside the class where the name is declared. But you can access the name implicitly the following way:) decltype( Base::nested) instance;


4

According to the standard, $11.7/1 Nested classes [class.access.nest] A nested class is a member and as such has the same access rights as any other member. So, it's quite simple. NestedBase is a private member of class Base, so Base::NestedBase can't be accessed in main(). b.nested.Do(); is OK because nested and Do() both are public members. The ...


1

You can fix it like this: public Author(String f, String l, boolean authorCheck){ firstName = f; lastName = l; if(authorCheck) { author = this; } } public Author(String f, String l){ firstName = f; lastName = l; author = this; } public Translator(String f, String l) { super(f, l, false); translator = ...


1

It would make more sense if Translator implements IPerson instead of extending Author.


0

You're making a super(f,l) call in the constructor of Translator. Translator is changing the Author fields as the superclass of Translator is Author.


0

Yes, possible to do: AbstractDocument.BranchElement.replace() looks like this: public void replace(int offset, int length, Element[] elems) ... Turns out that "offset" and "length" here refer to the sub-elements of the BranchElement (typically LeafElements), not to the offset and length of the underlying text in the StyledDocument. Somebody cleverer ...


0

Qualify Node() with self: class UnrolledLinkedList(object): class Node(object): def __init__(self): self.array = [] self.next_node = None def __init__(self, max_node_capacity=16): self.max_node_capacity = max_node_capacity self.head = self.Node() Python needs to qualify references to things. In this case, you ...


0

The inner class Node is a member of the class UnrolledLinkedList and can only be accessed via self. def __init__(self, max_node_capacity=16): self.max_node_capacity = max_node_capacity self.head = self.Node()


0

Use: self.head = self.Node() and it works. A class does not create its own name space. Using self.Node(), Python first searches all attributes of the instances. Since it does not find the name Node there, it it searches the class UnrolledLinkedList for Node. Alternatively, you can use the class name directly: UnrolledLinkedList.Node() You can ...


5

Methods do not include their class as a scope to be searched. If you want this to work then you will need to use either UnrolledLinkedList.Node or self.Node instead.


30

There are 4, namely: x, this.x, super.x and Outer.this.x. Consider the following: public class Outer { int x; public static void main(String[] args) { Outer outer = new Outer(); Outer.Inner inner = outer.new Inner(); outer.x = 3; inner.x = 2; inner.f(1); } class Inner extends Outer { int x; ...


9

There are four of them: Outer.this.x for the Outer class property this.x for the Inner class property super.x for the super type Outer class property x for the method argument


0

Static Inner class reaches private static fields of Outer classes. It means that if I extend Outer.Inner class anywhere,(because Inner is static, I don't have to make object before extend) I cannot reach the private fields of Outer class. This is perfectly good for context security.


1

The problem is that your inner, hoisted function only exists within a private scope, and isn't overriding it's parent even though it shares the same name, because it's newly declared When you use var fn = function () {} it will exist where defined When you use function fn () {} it will be available to code written above itself, because it's hoisted Eg: ...



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