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13

You can do that, you just need to remember the last visited node along with the current node. Doing this is not disallowed by the problem statement: both visited flag on each node and a stack are (worst case) O(n), remembering the last node is just O(1). In C#, the algorithm could look like this: static void Walk(Node node) { Node lastNode = null; ...


10

To me, there are two problems in the design: The algorithm seems to be the recursive one adapted for iteration and The Node class knows about being visited. Here is a different solution (you will need to adapt it a bit): // Inorder traversal: // Keep the nodes in the path that are waiting to be visited Stack s = new Stack(); // The first node to be ...


9

Here is another way to do it. I think it is essentially equivalent to svick's answer, but avoids the extra variable. This version is implemented in Python: node=root if node is not None: while node.left is not None: node=node.left while node is not None: output(node) if node.right is not None: node=node.right while node.left is ...


9

If you want them ordered by name, you can just call sort() on the array first. files.sort().forEach(printBr); If, for example, you'd like to sort directories first, then you need to get more information. A naive implementation would be to query the stats of each file in the sort comparison function: files.sort(function(a, b) { var aIsDir = fs....


9

Yes, but you need to define what the order is. Post and Pre order are identical, but inorder takes a definition of how the branches compare with the nodes.


8

Start with the preorder traversal. Either it is empty, in which case you are done, or it has a first element, r0, the root of the tree. Now search the inorder traversal for r0. The left subtree will all come before that point and the right subtree will all come after that point. Thus you can divide the inorder traversal at that point into an inorder ...


6

When nodes store pointers to their parents, it almost always maeans their immediate parents and not their successors. The question in this interview is then how to navigate the tree to find the inorder successor. The way to find an in order successor is to think about what would happen if you were to recursively do an in order walk of the tree, then to ...


5

in = {1,3,2,5}; pre = {2,1,5,3}; I've some difficulties constructing the tree 'by hand'. pre shows that 2 must be the root, in shows that {1,3} are nodes of the left subtree, {5} is the right subtree: 2 / \ / \ {1,3} {5} But knowing this, 3 can't be the last element in pre because it is clearly an element of the left subtree and we ...


5

Using svick's correct idea (see his answer), this is the tested code in C++. Note that I didn't test his code or even take a look at it, I just took his idea and implemented my own function. void in_order_traversal_iterative_with_parent(node* root) { node* current = root; node* previous = NULL; while (current) { if (previous == current->parent) { // ...


5

I'll try to give it a shot. Imagine a tree a b c d e f g Each letter represents a Node object. What happens when you pass in the 'a' node is that it will look at the first left node and find 'b'. It will then call the same method on 'b' and wait until that returns In 'b' it will look for the first left node and ...


5

Strings are immutable in java. You are not concatenating new String to old one, you are creating new String and make string variable point to it. Result is that you have many unrelated Strings and string variable points to them in various points in time. You need to pass mutable object to your function such as StringBuilder. This solution have additional ...


4

The short answer is that each packet contains offset information (disguised as sequence number), specifying where in the stream its payload lies. Let's say the following occurred: packet 1 is received, packet 2 is not received, and packet 3 and 4 are received. At this point receiving TCP stack knows where to copy contents of packets 3 and 4 on the buffer, ...


4

To construct a BST you need only one (not in-order) traversal. In general, to build a binary tree you are going to need two traversals, in order and pre-order for example. However, for the special case of BST - the in-order traversal is always the sorted array containing the elements, so you can always reconstruct it and use an algorithm to reconstruct a ...


4

I've accepted the answer of Dialecticus as it provides a good basis for implementing this algorithm. The only issue with this answer is that it requires that the VisitBinary() method know about its parent caller as a method argument, which is not feasible since these methods are overloads of a base method. I provide the following solution, which uses a ...


4

I think you are unclear what in-order means. 1 .. 15 is the expected output for in-order traversal of a binary search tree containing the values 1 .. 15. The sequence you gave sounds like pre-order on a balanced binary search tree. In other words, your traversal code is correct for in-order traversal. That said, your tree generation code does not produce ...


4

Unfortunately Wikipedia is right! Detailed Algorithm inorder_traversal(node) { if(node!=NULL) { inorder_traversas(node->left); print(node->data); //you overlooked this statement on reaching G inorder_traversal(node->right); } } Where are you ...


4

Haskell's append ++ performs linearly in the length of its left argument, which means that you may get quadratic performance if the tree leans left. One possibility would be to use difference list. Another one would be to define a Foldable instance: data Tree a = Empty | Node a (Tree a) (Tree a) instance Foldable Tree where foldr f z Empty = z ...


4

Here is the algorithm for in-order traversal without recursion: 1) Create an empty stack S. 2) Initialize current node as root 3) Push the current node to S and set current = current->left until current is NULL 4) If current is NULL and stack is not empty then a) Pop the top item from stack. b) Print the popped item, set current = ...


4

There are 2 problems in your implementation: temp = [None] The above statement creates a list with a None item: x = len(temp) # x value will be 1 The second problem is your method appending logic; you return the values instead of append them. Here is an implementation base on your code: def inorder(self): result = [] if self.__left: ...


3

No, retrieving postorder/preorder from only inorder traversal is not possible. If it was, it would be possible to reconstruct a binary tree with only the inorder traversal, which is not possible because one inorder traversal can give you several possible reconstructed binary trees.


3

Try something like this, assuming that node.NodeType is of type NodeType, and that function Precedes exists and returns true if first parameter precedes the second. protected override Expression Visit(BinaryExpression node, NodeType parentType) { bool useParenthesis = Precedes(parentType, node.NodeType); if (useParenthesis) Console.Write("("...


3

This looks like a class exercise, designed to help you understand binary trees. Before you write any code, draw a picture of your tree, with a value at each node, such as "A", "B", "C", etc. Then starting from the root node, see what you need to do to visit each node in order. Write what you have learned in pseudo code, and test it by doing what it says. ...


3

T(n) = T(n/2) + T(n/2) + 1 Level 0 has 1 operation. Level 1 has 2 operations. Level 2 has 4 operations. Level k has 2^k operations. The depth of the tree is lgn. 1+2+...+2^lgn= 2^0+2^1+2^2+...+2^lgn= (2^(lgn + 1)-1)/(2-1)=2*2^lgn= 2n.


3

The following loop: while (n != null) { inOrder(n.lchild); System.out.println(n); inOrder(n.rchild); } will run forever if n == null. And will keep on calling the recursive method on each iteration. Perhaps, you should change it to: if (n != null) { inOrder(n.lchild); System.out.println(n); inOrder(n.rchild); }


3

Look at your method declaration: public ArrayList<T> inOrderIterator() It doesn't have any parameters. But look how you're trying to invoke it: inOrderIterator(currentNode.getRightChild()); ... you're specifying an argument. There's no method which is applicable for that call. I suspect you want to overload the method to have a private method ...


3

One solution that also permits sublinear deletion is to build a data structure D that uses a linked list D.L for the traversal in order of insertion, and a sorted tree D.T for the traversal in order of magnitude. But how to link them to additionally achieve a remove operation in sublinear time? The trick is that D.T should not store the values, but just a ...


3

From the post-order(LRN), we know that last element is the root. We can find the root in in-order(LNR). Then we can identify the left and right sub-trees of the root from in-order. Using the length of left sub-tree, we can identify left and right sub-trees in post-order array. Recursively, we can build up the tree. Check this link.


3

Here you read the value of the root node: root = newNode(); fscanf(infile,"%s",inputStringPtr); root->Word = inputString; and here, you overwrite it again with the value of the second node: while (fscanf(infile,"%s",inputStringPtr) == 1) { You could use strdup() to make a copy of the root value: root->Word = strdup(inputString); This should ...


3

Something like that maybe? string BSTree::InOrder(BSTNode* bst_node) { if (!bst_node) return ""; ostringstream ss; ss << InOrder(bst_node->GetLeftChild()); ss << bst_node->GetContents() << " "; ss << InOrder(bst_node->GetRightChild()); return ss.str(); } or, you can pass around the same instance of ...


3

So the inorder is: E A C K F H D B G And the preorder must be from: a. FAEKCDBHG b. FAEKCDHGB c. EAFKHDCBG d. FEAKDCHBG You should proceed by drawing the tree for each of these options while also making it fit with the inorder traversal and see for which one that is possible. To do that, for each character in the preorder traversal, split the inorder ...



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