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262

import a_module print a_module.__file__ Will actually give you the path to the .pyc file that was loaded, at least on Mac OS X. So I guess you can do import os path = os.path.dirname(amodule.__file__) To get the directory to look for changes.


151

fswatch fswatch is a small program using the Mac OS X FSEvents API to monitor a directory. When an event about any change to that directory is received, the specified shell command is executed by /bin/bash If you're on GNU/Linux, inotifywatch (part of the inotify-tools package on most distributions) provides similar functionality. Update: fswatch can now ...


77

There is inspect module in python. Official documentation The inspect module provides several useful functions to help get information about live objects such as modules, classes, methods, functions, tracebacks, frame objects, and code objects. For example, it can help you examine the contents of a class, retrieve the source code of a method, ...


60

You can use launchd for that purpose. Launchd can be configured to automatically launch a program when a file path is modified. For example the following launchd config plist will launch the program /usr/bin/logger when the desktop folder of my user account is modified: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple ...


42

As the other answers have said, the best way to do this is with __file__ (demonstrated again below). However, there is an important caveat, which is that __file__ does NOT exist if you are running the module on its own (i.e. as __main__). For example, say you have two files (both of which are on your PYTHONPATH): #/path1/foo.py import bar print ...


35

inotify requires support from the kernel to work. When an application tracks a directory, it asks the kernel to inform it when those changes occur. When the change occurs, in addition to writing those changes to disk, the kernel also notifies the watching process. On a remote NFS machine, the change is not visible to the kernel; it happens entirely ...


30

If you're using .net, use FileSystemWatcher. More info here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.filesystemwatcher.aspx If you're using C, use FindFirstChangeNotification, FindNextChangeNotification, ReadDirectoryChangesW. More info here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa365261(VS.85).aspx On OSX, the relevant api is the fsevents ...


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See the FindFirstChangeNotification API, or the .NET counterpart FileSystemWatcher


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I will try tackling a few variations on this question as well: finding the path of the called script finding the path of the currently executing script finding the directory of the called script (Some of these questions have been asked on SO, but have been closed as duplicates and redirected here.) Caveats of Using __file__ For a module that you ...


16

take a look at this: inotify-win, a port of the inotifywait tool for Windows and also this: inotify-tools


15

By default, the text output from inotifywait -e CREATE is of form watched_filename CREATE event_filename where watched_filename represents /home/inventory/initcsv and event_filename represents the name of the new file. So, in place of your while inotifywait -e ... line, put: DIR=/home/inventory/initcsv while RES=$(inotifywait -e create ...


15

This LWN article is often quoted as a source of documentation for fanotify. But the description there appears to be out of date. fanotify no longer works using a socket connection. Instead, there are two new libc functions wrapping syscalls, declared in sys/fanotify.h. One is called fanotify_init, the other is fanotify_mark. At the time of this writing, ...


13

You might want to take a look at (and maybe expand) my little tool kqwait. Currently it just sits around and waits for a write event on a single file, but the kqueue architecture allows for hierarchical event stacking...


13

The biggest difference is that epoll can be used for ANY fd. This means it's good for watching all types of ways to communicate data. Sockets, IPC, files, printers.. anything. inotify is for filesystems only. However, because inotify is specific to filesystems, you can receive notifications on a wide array of filesystem-specific attributes, such as file ...


12

You mean like Tup: From the home page: "Tup is a file-based build system - it inputs a list of file changes and a directed acyclic graph (DAG), then processes the DAG to execute the appropriate commands required to update dependent files. The DAG is stored in an SQLite database. By default, the list of file changes is generated by scanning the filesystem. ...


11

import os path = os.path.abspath(__file__) dir_path = os.path.dirname(path)


10

JNotify or FileMon from Microsoft.


10

You can use audit deamon: sudo apt-get install auditd Choose a file to monitor touch /tmp/myfile Add audit for write and attribute change (-p wa): sudo auditctl -w /tmp/myfile -p wa -k my-file-changed The file is touched by some user: touch /tmp/myfile Check audit logs: sudo ausearch -k my-file-changed | tail -1 You can see the UID of the user ...


10

watchdog is a cross-platform python API for watching files / directories, and it has builtin "tricks" tool that allows you to trigger actions (including shell commands) when events occur (including new added file, removed file and changed file).


10

I started having this problem with tailing. I think it is because I am also running dropbox on this machine. My fix is what dropbox suggests: echo 900000 | sudo tee /proc/sys/fs/inotify/max_user_watches


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The documentation for the fanotify API is available in the Linux manpages: fanotify.7 - http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man7/fanotify.7.html fanotify_init.2 - http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/fanotify_init.2.html fanotify_mark.2 - http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man2/fanotify_mark.2.html Here are some examples, fatrace being the most elaborate. ...


10

The kqueue package should do this: http://hackage.haskell.org/package/kqueue


9

This was trivial. Each module has a __file__ variable that shows its relative path from where you are right now. Therefore, getting a directory for the module to notify it is simple as: os.path.dirname(__file__)


9

Monitor file system activity with inotify Kernel Korner - Intro to inotify


9

The problem is that read is a blocking operation by default. If you don't want it to block, use select or poll before read. For example: struct pollfd pfd = { fd, POLLIN, 0 }; int ret = poll(&pfd, 1, 50); // timeout of 50ms if (ret < 0) { fprintf(stderr, "poll failed: %s\n", strerror(errno)); } else if (ret == 0) { // Timeout with no ...


9

A single inotify object can handle any number of watches. That's one of the advantages of inotify over the older and now obsolete dnotify. So you should be saying: my $inotify = Linux::Inotify2->new; $inotify->watch("/tmp/rules.txt", IN_MODIFY); $inotify->watch("/tmp/csvrules.out", IN_MODIFY); Then you can see which watch was triggered by ...


8

I don't think you can do it with inotify. Here is the method though: Read uevents from kernel via a Netlink socket and filter out those where "ACTION" is not "mount". Read and parse "/proc/mounts" when you get an event with a "mount" action. Find a record for a mount point with device that was just mounted and filter it out if it's not the directory you ...


8

You have misidentified the problem. const int nbDescriptors = poll(&descriptors, m_fd+1, 10*1000); This is wrong because the first argument to poll is a (pointer to an) array, and the second argument is the number of elements in that array. As a result, the system call is reading past the end of the array. By declaring it static you just moved ...


8

Basic usage According to inotify(7), you can use the FIONREAD ioctl to find out how much data is available to be read and size your buffer accordingly. Here's some (very rough) code that can accomplish this: unsigned int avail; ioctl(inotify_fd, FIONREAD, &avail); char buffer[avail]; read(fd, buffer, avail); int offset = 0; while (offset < avail) ...



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