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62

Selection Sort: Given a list, take the current element and exchange it with the smallest element on the right hand side of the current element. Insertion Sort: Given a list, take the current element and insert it at the appropriate position of the list, adjusting the list every time you insert. It is similar to arranging the cards in a Card game. Time ...


26

Both insertion sort and selection sort have an outer loop (over every index), and an inner loop (over a subset of indices). Each pass of the inner loop expands the sorted region by one element, at the expense of the unsorted region, until it runs out of unsorted elements. The difference is in what the inner loop does: In selection sort, the inner loop is ...


23

You can use indexOfObject:inSortedRange:options:usingComparator: method on the entire array. This method performs a binary search on a range that you pass, and gives you the insertion point when you use the NSBinarySearchingInsertionIndex option: NSUInteger insPoint = [myArray indexOfObject:toInsert inSortedRange:NSMakeRange(0, [myArray count]) ...


21

To answer this question, let's first determine how we can evaluate the runtime of insertion sort. If we can find a nice mathematical expression for the runtime, we can then manipulate that expression to determine the average runtime. The key observation we need to have is that the runtime of insertion sort is closely related to the number of inversions in ...


11

This is what I came up with, which seems to be functional, generic, tail-recursive (foldLeft is tail-recursive)...: def insertionSort[A](la: List[A])(implicit ord: Ordering[A]): List[A] = { def insert(la: List[A], a: A) = { val (h, t) = la.span(ord.lt(_, a)) h ::: (a :: t) } la.foldLeft(List[A]()) {(acc, a) => insert(acc, a)} }


10

Let me try to break this down. Start by considering a list. It is "almost" sorted. That is, the first few elements are sorted, but the last element is not sorted. So it looks something like this: [10, 20, 30, 50, 15] Obviously, the 15 is in the wrong place. So how do we move it? key = mylist[4] mylist[4] = mylist[3] mylist[3] = key ...


10

because, after the merge sort, the objects in elements are already sorted. do another elements = GetFilledList(i, 0, Int32.MaxValue, false); before the sw.Restart();


10

The idiom sizeof(arr)/sizeof(int) only works for statically-allocated arrays, and only within the scope that defines them. In other words, you can use it for arrays like: int foo[32]; ...in the scope in which they're defined. But not elsewhere, and not for arrays simply passed as pointers. For other cases, you'll need to pass along extra information ...


10

It's possible that the confusion is because you're comparing a description of sorting a linked list with a description of sorting an array. But I can't be sure, since you didn't cite your sources. The easiest way to understand sorting algorithms is often to get a detailed description of the algorithm (not vague stuff like "this sort uses swap. Somewhere. ...


9

Big-O Notation describes the limiting behavior when n is large, also known as asymptotic behavior. This is an approximation. (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_O_notation) Insertion sort is faster for small n because Quick Sort has extra overhead from the recursive function calls. Insertion sort is also more stable than Quick sort and requires less ...


9

There are many ways that you could do this: Build the array and sort as you go. This is likely to be very slow, since the time required to move array elements over to make space for the new element will almost certainly dominate the sorting time. You should expect this to take at best Ω(n2) time, where n is the number of elements that you want to ...


9

Try this: public class RecursiveInsertionSort { static int[] arr = {5, 2, 4, 6, 1, 3}; int maxIndex = arr.length; public static void main(String[] args) { print(arr); new RecursiveInsertionSort().sort(arr.length); } /* The sorting function uses 'index' instead of 'copying the array' in each recursive ...


9

On average each insertion must traverse half the currently sorted list while making one comparison per step. The list grows by one each time. So starting with a list of length 1 and inserting the first item to get a list of length 2, we have average an traversal of .5 (0 or 1) places. The rest are 1.5 (0, 1, or 2 place), 2.5, 3.5, ... , n-.5 for a list ...


8

I haven't looked too carefully, but I think the book's pseudocode uses one-based indexing, and for coding in C (or most modern languages) you need to adjust it to zero-based indexing. The principal suspect is for(int j=2; j<input; j++) Where you might want to start at 1 instead of 2. The termination condition while(i>0 && A[i]>key) ...


8

First problem: you're expecting compareTo to always return 1 for "greater than". It just returns a value greater than 0 which may be a different positive integer. So both your == 1 comparisons should be > 0. There may be other problems, but that's the first one I'd look at.


7

Your solution seems to be bubble sort, not insertion sort.


7

It looks like the first pseudocode block used 1 based indexing while the second uses 0 based indexing.


7

Define "small". When benchmarking sorting algorithms, I found out that switching from quicksort to insertion sort - despite what everybody was saying - actually hurts performance (recursive quicksort in C) for arrays larger than 4 elements. And those arrays can be sorted with a size-dependent optimal sorting algorithm. That being said, always keep in mind ...


7

In OptQSort2, for small partitions, you have the following function call: InsertionSort.sort(data); Is this supposed to insertion sort the small partition? It looks like you are insertion sorting the entire array. Shouldn't you pass the min and max indexes to InsertionSort? Another option is to simply do no work on small partitions during OptQSort2. Then ...


7

this is a standard problem named inversion count This can be solved using mergesort in O(n*lg(n)). Here is my code for counting the inversions int a[200001]; long long int count; void Merge(int p,int q,int r) { int n1,n2,i,j,k,li,ri; n1=q-p+1; n2=r-q; int l[n1+1],rt[n2+1]; for(i=0;i<n1;i++) l[i]=a[p+i]; ...


7

In Quick-sort , you choose a random pivot that delimits the array to two half's, most of the chances that one may be smaller, e.g. Array size 100, pivot delimits the array to 40 / 60, the 40 is the the smaller size. Lets assume that you decide on your threshold size to use the insertion sort to be 10, you need to continue recursively split the array by ...


7

You're never touching a[0] in while (i > 0 && a[i] < key) { so it isn't sorted into its due place. Use >= instead of >: while (i >= 0 && a[i] < key) { The same problem would occur when sorting in ascending order.


6

Your function accepts its argument by value; this means it gets a copy. You sort the copy, in vain. Change it to a reference instead: void insertionSort (vector<int>& data, int n)


6

The insertion sort algorithm works by trying to build up a sorted list of increasing length at the start of the array. The idea is that if you start off by building a one-element sorted list at the beginning, then a two-element list, then a three-element list, etc., that once you've built up an n-element sorted list, you have sorted the entire array and are ...


6

There are multiple ways one can make standard quicksort more efficent. To implement the first tip from your post you should write something like: void quicksort(int * tab, int l, int r) { int q; while(l < r) { q = partition(tab, l, r); if(q - l < r - q) //recurse into the smaller half { quicksort(tab, l, q - 1); ...


6

Yes, this is because your implementation is incorrect. The inner loop should count backward from i-1 down to 0, and it should terminate as soon as it finds an element ioList[j] that is already smaller than ioList[i]. It is because of that termination criterion that the algorithm performs in O(n) time in the best case: If the input list is already sorted, ...


6

Your implementation of "insertion sort" is poor. In your inner loop, you should not scan all the way up to i-1 swapping each element greater than ioList[i]. Instead, you should scan backwards from i-1 until you find the correct place to insert the new element (that is, until you find an element less than or equal to the new element), and insert it there. If ...


6

The "best" way would probably be to implement a new function for the insertion. This function would iterate over the list until it finds a node whose next nodes value is less or equal to the node you want to insert, then put the new node before the next node. How about this function: void insert(struct PCB **head, const int reg1, const int reg2) { ...


6

You can swap structs the same way that you swap integers: wordType tmp; wordType a = {.word="hello", .count=5}; wordType b = {.word="world", .count=11}; tmp = a; a = b; b = tmp; Demo on ideone.



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