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9

You can use indexOfObject:inSortedRange:options:usingComparator: method on the entire array. This method performs a binary search on a range that you pass, and gives you the insertion point when you use the NSBinarySearchingInsertionIndex option: NSUinteger insPoint = [myArray indexOfObject:toInsert inSortedRange:NSMakeRange(0, [myArray count]) ...


7

On average each insertion must traverse half the currently sorted list while making one comparison per step. The list grows by one each time. So starting with a list of length 1 and inserting the first item to get a list of length 2, we have average an traversal of .5 (0 or 1) places. The rest are 1.5 (0, 1, or 2 place), 2.5, 3.5, ... , n-.5 for a list ...


5

items[j].compareTo(items[j]) should be items[j].compareTo(temp), otherwise you're just comparing the item against itself - you need to be comparing it against the object you want to insert. Then items[j] = temp; will also cause an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException because, at the end of the loop, items[j] is smaller than temp, or j == -1, so we need to insert ...


5

In Introduction to Algorithms, they always assume arrays start at index 1, so you are starting your range() at 1, but python lists are 0-based indexed. This means you are never comparing 5, which is at A[0]. Notice everything after 5 is sorted. modifying your for loop to - for j in range(0, len(A)): and your while condition to while i >= 0 and A[i] ...


5

Because of short-circuit evaluation. If the first half of an && is false, the second half will not be evaluated at all (since the result cannot possibly be true). Therefore, you can write j > 0 && A[j - 1]..., and A[j - 1] will only be evaluated if j > 0.


5

With normal insertion sort, you loop from start to end, and each item is moved up until it's in place. With this insertion sort, you still loop from start to end, but if the item you're on is >= the kth item, just leave it; if less, move it to position k, then move it up until it's in place. for i = 1 to k j = i while j > 1 and A[j-1] > A[j] ...


4

This is what I came up with, which seems to be functional, generic, tail-recursive (foldLeft is tail-recursive)...: def insertionSort[A](la: List[A])(implicit ord: Ordering[A]): List[A] = { def insert(la: List[A], a: A) = { val (h, t) = la.span(ord.lt(_, a)) h ::: (a :: t) } la.foldLeft(List[A]()) {(acc, a) => insert(acc, a)} }


4

Because the search and moving is combined in the first case and the search is just extra work in the second case. Comparing integers is cheap, compared to moving integers around. Account for divisions, loop overhead, taken conditional jumps in every loop iteration vs. non-taken cond jumps, etc ... PS. Indeed, in the linear search version, the inner loop is ...


4

To pass an array to a function, you can simply use int *array: void outputNums(int *numArray) { for(int x=0; x<numArraySize; x++) { cout << numArray[x]; if(x != numArraySize-1) { cout << " - "; } } } Please note that it would be better to use a standard container like a vector.


4

You cannot compare objects, including Strings, with comparison operators such as >. You must call a method that does the comparison. String is Comparable<String>, so replace list[k] > currentElement with list[k].compareTo(currentElement) > 0


3

Briefly: The good news is that you have your compilation working. The not-so-good news is the segfault. Likely a logic error in your code. In general, adding or removing to NumericVector etc is a bad idea. These are shallow types which directly connect to the R memory of the same object ("no copies"). This means extending or removing is costly. Consider ...


3

Passing vectors by reference rather than by value makes a huge difference. On my machine with SIZE=50000, compiled with -O3, before: merge sort time = 5730000 insertion sort time = 1470000 After: merge sort time = 10000 insertion sort time = 1470000 I only changed two lines: vector<int> merge(const vector<int> &left,const ...


3

As a hint - the runtime of insertion sort is Θ(n + I), where n is the number of elements and I is the number of inversions in the array. What happens if you insertion sort the array, given that it only has O(n) inversions? What will the time complexity be? Hope this helps!


3

You'll need to read the file in order to determine where the new record needs to go. You'll need to make room for the new record You'll need to write the new record in the proper location. 1 & 3 are pretty easy; 2 is the nasty bit. 2 main approaches: Copy the part of the file that comes after the new record far enough down in the file to make room ...


3

Here is my attempt, might not be the best one though :) It's quite a direct translation of the Haskell monoid. Since we don't have auto-currying in Clojure, I needed to make a special comp-2 function. (defn comp-2 [f g] (fn [x y] (f (g x) (g y)))) (defn pure-list [x] (cond (sequential? x) (if (empty? x) '() (seq x)) :else (list x))) (def ...


3

In order to apply insertion sort on your array/collection the elements need to be comparable (Comparison logic is on the basis of how you want to compare 2 faculty members, can be on the basis of name, age, salary etc). This can be done by implementing the interface Comparable in Faculty class and defining the function compareTo() as follows : public class ...


3

You just need to keep the condition ( j >= 0 ) and to change your starting point in your loop over i, you should start from 1 not from 2.


3

By putting temp = a[i] in the initialisation clause of the outer loop, you make sure that it only runs once. In the example you've given, temp will be assigned 2, and you never change it to anything else. Then in the rest of the loop, you end up assigning the value of temp to other entries in the array, whenever there's a larger entry. So most of the ...


3

You've implemented insertion sort wrong. The code that was supposed to be an insertion sort doesn't even sort the array; for example, trying it on the input int a[] = {4, 2, 3, 1, 5}; gives the output [2, 3, 1, 4, 5] See a demo: http://ideone.com/aFCPft Given that the code doesn't work, the timing data doesn't tell us much.


3

for(i = 1; i < arr_size; ++i) { key = arr[i]; for(j = i - 1; j >= 0 && (order == INCREASING ? (arr[j] > key) : (arr[j] < key)) ; --j) { arr[j+1] = arr[j]; } arr[j+1] = key; }


2

One problem is that you are comparing two NSNumber pointers rather than the values of the NSNumber objects: while (i>-1 && [arr objectAtIndex:i] > key) { Should be: while (i > -1 && [[arr objectAtIndex:i] intValue] > [key intValue]) {


2

Assuming you mean the qsort from the C library, here's the qsort() from a somewhat recent glibc, which is the one used in most Linux systems: http://www.cs.umaine.edu/~chaw/200801/capstone/n/qsort.c.html. It does indeed switch to insertion for small partitions. It happens to use 4 elements for the threshold, though it's possible the empirically-selected ...


2

In short, the worst case is when your list is in the exact opposite order you need. In that case: For the first item, you make 0 comparisons, of course. For the second item, you compare it to the first item and find that they are not in the right position; you've made 1 comparison. For the third, you compare it with both, and find that the third has ...


2

I had underestimated your question, but it actually isn't easy to answer. There are a lot of different elements to consider. Doing lst.insert(y, lst.pop(x)) is a O(n) operation, because lst.pop(x) costs O(len(lst) - x) since list elements must be contiguous, and thus the list has to shift-left by one all the elements after index x, and dually lst.insert(y, ...


2

Reading the stack trace indicates that the error occurs on line a[j]=term; Looking up, you can see that the while loop ends when j<0; therefore, you must be getting this error because j=-1. Experimentation reveals that your code works if you add j++; between the while and a[j]=term;


2

According to the error status, it shows the error is on the a[j] = term So if you look at this closely you can see that while loop causes the ArrayIndexOutofBoundsException. So you can write the code like this: public static int[] Sort(int a[]){ for(int i=1;i<a.length;i++){ int term=a[i]; int j=i-1; ...


2

Here, for reference, is another version which turns the tail recursion modulo cons into tail recursion with an accumulator. For the sake of variety, here is also one way to partially simulate the absent type-classes. (defprotocol Monoid (mempty [_] ) (mappend [_ xs ys])) (defn fold-map [monoid f xs] (reduce (partial mappend monoid) (mempty ...


2

Without seeing the Faculty class, we can only guess at your problem. It seems that Faculty does not implement Comparable. You can call the function with an Integer[], because Integer is comparable--it does implement Comparable. You'll need to implement Comparable<Faculty> in your Faculty class, by overriding compareTo(Faculty) public int ...


2

You initialize your array as new String[size];. This will populate a String array of size size, with default values, aka null for Strings. When you call compareTo with items of your array, you are referencing a null value as your array was not populated with String instances prior to that. As a result, you get a NullPointerException. As a quick test, ...


2

Complexity isn't given by the number of moves but by the number of operations overall, in this case comparisons as well. Insertion sort is O(n^2) average complexity, you can't make it faster than that. In works in O(n) only in best case scenario, when the input string is already sorted (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insertion_sort).



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