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20

I just had to do this exact thing so I figured I'd post the recipe here. This assumes that both databases are on the same server. First, copy the table from the old db to the new db (because apparently you can't move data between databases). At the commandline: pg_dump -U postgres -t <old_table> <old_database> | psql -U postgres -d ...


14

Databases are isolated in Postgresql; when you connect to a postgresql server you connect to just one database, you can't copy data from one database to another using a SQL query. If you come from Mysql: what Mysql calls (loosely) "databases" are in Postgresql "schemas" - sort of namespaces. A Postgresql database can have many schemas, each one with its ...


13

Fast Data Loading Translate your data to CSV. Create a temporary table (as you noted, without indexes). Execute a COPY command: \COPY schema.temp_table FROM /tmp/data.csv WITH CSV Insert the data into the non-temporary table. Create indexes. Set appropriate statistics. Further Recommendations For large volumes of data: Split the data into child ...


9

They're not the same. foo << bar is foo.operator<<(bar) or operator<<(foo, bar), while bar >> foo is bar.operator>>(foo) or operator>>(bar, foo). They're just different things. Whether any of those versions exist, let alone whether if two versions exist they do the same thing, is entirely dependent on what's in your code. ...


8

Sure! The TreeMap.putAll method (and the TreeMap constructor that takes a SortedMap) calls a method called buildFromSorted internally, which is described in the docs as: "Linear time tree building algorithm from sorted data", so that sounds like it does what you want. Just give the putAll method something that implements Map, but where the map's entryset ...


8

Complete new answer according to your updated answer. You may check für any connected USB device: ManagementScope sc = new ManagementScope(@"\\YOURCOMPUTERNAME\root\cimv2"); ObjectQuery query = new ObjectQuery("Select * from Win32_USBHub"); ManagementObjectSearcher searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(sc, ...


7

Just a quick guess, the QT Doc for QAbstractItemModel says... The model emits signals to indicate changes. For example, dataChanged() is emitted whenever items of data made available by the model are changed. Changes to the headers supplied by the model cause headerDataChanged() to be emitted. If the structure of the underlying data ...


7

I haven't looked too carefully, but I think the book's pseudocode uses one-based indexing, and for coding in C (or most modern languages) you need to adjust it to zero-based indexing. The principal suspect is for(int j=2; j<input; j++) Where you might want to start at 1 instead of 2. The termination condition while(i>0 && A[i]>key) ...


7

What I would probably do in your situation, is create another class that overloads the operator<<, then make a static member of that type. Like this: class MyClass { public: static std::string msg; struct Out { Out & operator<< (const std::string& token) { MyClass::msg.append(token); return ...


7

Use skip list. Another option should be tiered vector. The skip list performs inserts at const O(log(n)) and keeps the numbers in order. The tiered vector supports insert in O(sqrt(n)) and again can print the elements in order. EDIT: per the comment of amit I will explain how do you find the k-th element in a skip list: For each element you have a tower on ...


7

The set you are passing to addProducts contains NSString, not Products. NSMutableSet* products = [NSMutableSet set]; Products* product = [NSEntityDescription insertNewObjectForEntityForName: @"Products" inManagedObjectContext: context]; product.item = @"Widget 1"; [products addObject: product]; product = [NSEntityDescription ...


6

First: I assume you are talking about a relationship between two entities. Something like @Entity public class A { @ManyToMany @JoinTable(name = "A_B", joinColumns = { @JoinColumn(name = "A_fk") }, inverseJoinColumns = { @JoinColumn(name = "B_fk") }) private Set<B> bSet = new LinkedHashSet<B>(); } Hibernate does not preserve the order ...


6

At first glance, the simple answer seems to be if the test string is sequentially contained in the target string then your test passes. Something like: int i = 0; foreach (char c in target) { if (i == test.Length) return true; // Found all test chars if (test[i] == c) { i++; // found this test char; check for next if (i == ...


5

There are three options for copying it if this is a one off: Use a db_link (I think it is still in contrib) Have the application do the work. Export/import If this is an ongoing need, the answers are: Change to schemas in the same DB db_link


5

Because JavaScript has Automatic Semicolon Insertion. I erroneously called it Automatic Semicolon Injection earlier, which kind of makes sense :P The language requires them, but it preprocesses your script and tries to guess where they should go. This doesn't always work out, as you can see in pst's comment. You should just define the semi colons ...


5

You have a type mismatch. You're passing a Nodo* into the pair constructor while it expects a Nodo object. You declare: Nodo *Raiz; and then you try to call: pair<int, Nodo>(V, Raiz) which expects an int and a Nodo. But you passed it int and Nodo*. What you probably want is this: class Grafo { public: Nodo *Raiz; ...


5

Updated to print "Hello" It can be done this way (oh the ugliness!): #define OUT(x) if((x > 0 ? cout << "Hello " : cout), x > 1) cout << x+1 This is a "standard" comma operator trick that allows additional expressions to be evaluated within the if conditional without affecting the branch taken in the end. In this case one expression is ...


5

That is correct - insertion at the front of a Python standard list is O(n). Python lists are implemented as arrays, and thus inserting something at the front of the list requires shifting the entire contents over one spot. Appending, on the other hand, does not require any shifting, and thus is amortized O(1). Note, however, that a.pop(i) is also an O(n) ...


5

You can! It's called a "data migration". There are plenty of times you might want to use one: the link above gives a good example, another is the "data migration for every Django project": from south.v2 import DataMigration from django.conf import settings class Migration(DataMigration): def forwards(self, orm): Site = orm['sites.Site'] ...


5

The code given compiles and runs just fine in VS2010 SP1. There's no issue with the code as shown either, it's perfectly legal. I's a little odd to declare an operator overload and then call it with operator <<, as you could just as easily write m << m. Some guesses: You are taking the address of m somewhere in the operator implementation ...


5

Your new node is not being "hooked up" correctly, since you're just storing the pointer in the local variable curr, instead of writing it to *hd to change the caller's pointer. Also, don't cast the return value of malloc() in C.


5

You can read John Shipman's nicely-written pure-Python implementation, which even includes detailed explanations on how he built it, from the top-level design down to how the classes were implemented, including things like a discussion on how to provide a nice Pythonic interface. You can also search PyPI, where there are multiple additional implementations. ...


5

This looks like a question about joining items in an Array. JavaScript has Array.prototype.join for this purpose, so you would want to do var str = 'foo'; if (EXTRA.length) str += '/extra.' + EXTRA.join('/extra.'); str; // "foo/extra.200/extra.300/extra.400"


4

are you doing your insert as a series of INSERT INTO tablename (...) VALUES (...); INSERT INTO tablename (...) VALUES (...); ... or as one multiple-row insert: INSERT INTO tablename (...) VALUES (...),(...),(...); second one will be faster significantly on 100k rows. source: http://kaiv.wordpress.com/2007/07/19/faster-insert-for-multiple-rows/


4

A picture is worth a thousand words; an animation is worth a million: The key thing to notice here is that when the center node 50 is pulled up, it has to throw away its right child because it's too far down. However, 65 needs a new left child, so 50 hands 45 over to 65. 50 now needs a new right child, and the node containing 65 needs to be childed, so ...


4

I'd start with std::vector in this case, but use a second std::vector for your mass mutations, reserve() appropriately, then swap() the vectors. Update It would take this general form: std:vector<t_object*> source; // << source already holds 10000 elements std:vector<t_object*> tmp; // to minimize reallocations and frees to 1 and 1, if ...


4

Make a function to do the work for you and then call that function. This is how you could do the function if making it within ColdFusion. You could though simplify the amount of queries you are running to get to your end goal but I just wrote this via what you are already doing: <cffunction name="AddTheClass" access="public" returntype="numeric"> ...


4

insert at the 0th index of a list requires shifting every other element along which makes it an O(N) operation. However, if you use a deque this operation is O(1). append is an amortized O(1) operation since it simply requires adding the item on to the end of the list and no shifting is done. Sometimes the list needs to grow so it is not always an O(1) ...


4

istream& operator>>(istream& is, Polynomial Poly) should be istream& operator>>(istream& is, Polynomial& Poly) What you're doing now is simply changing the members of a copy of your object: Polynomial P1; cin >> P1; P1 is not modified after this.


4

Try this: public class RecursiveInsertionSort { static int[] arr = {5, 2, 4, 6, 1, 3}; int maxIndex = arr.length; public static void main(String[] args) { print(arr); new RecursiveInsertionSort().sort(arr.length); } /* The sorting function uses 'index' instead of 'copying the array' in each recursive ...



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