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Why does Go have several different types at all? To work with different type/kind of data. Why does Go have several different integer types? To work with different type/kind of integer data. There are even more which you haven't listed: byte alias for uint8 rune alias for int32 The distinction between signed and unsigned is pretty obvious. In Java ...


6

Go has two kinds of types: architecture dependent types such as int, uint, uintptr. and architecture independent types such as int32, int64 etc. The architecture dependent types have the appropriate length for the machine on which the program runs: an int is the default signed type: it takes 32 bit (4 bytes) on a 32 bit machine and 64 bit (8 bytes) on ...


4

The C99 language has a similar classification thru <stdint.h> (and C is even more fine-grained, with types like int_fast32_t) ; having that many integral types is useful for portability and efficiency. Compatibility with C99 & C++ may be enough a reason for Go to have these types. You may want to write code which can efficiently run on embedded ...


1

The leading zeroes have no meaning if the data type you require is an Integer (or any other numeric type). If on the other hand you need a String with leading zeroes, you can use this (works only if required string length is >= number of digits of the number you want to pad) : String myNumber = Integer.toString(42); String myNumberWithLeadingZeroes = ...


1

As far as I know you cannot have an integer typed variable with leading zeros. You can pad the number with zeros but then it will become a String. Take a look at: http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/apidocs/org/apache/commons/lang3/StringUtils.html#leftPad(java.lang.String,%20int) In order to conform to the signature you have to convert the ...



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