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15

For that specific processor (many other Fortran processors have similar characteristics, but the details differ): When a module is compiled successfully, the compiler generates a .mod file (and perhaps an .obj file) that contains information about the entities provided by the module. It is this mod file that the error message you quote is referring to. ...


6

One method: read the line into a string, using a string that is at least as long as the longest expected line. Then you go about parsing the string. E.g., if the numbers are always split by spaces, use that to figure out the substring boundaries. Then you can use "internal reads" to read from each sub-string to obtain the numeric values. An internal ...


5

If you compiler supports it, '(3f15.3, *(f9.2))' If you have an older compiler, just use a larger number than you will have items to output, e.g., '(3f15.3, 999(f9.2))'. You don't have to use up the format. For the most complicated cases you can write a format to a string and use that as your format: write (string, '( "(3f15.3, ", I4, "(f9.2))" )' ) ...


5

Instead of writing the format directly in the write statement, it's also possible to use a character variable. character(len=32) :: my_fmt my_fmt = '(3f15.3,3f9.2)' write(*, my_fmt) x, y, z, (var(i), i = 1, nvari) Now it is possible to manipulate the character variable to contain the wanted repeat count before the write statement, using a so-called ...


5

If you are using Intel fortran, it has a proprietary extension for this -- you can include an existing variable in angle brackets to act as a specifier: write(*,'(3f15.3,<nvari>f9.2)') x,y,z,(var(i),i=1,nvari)


5

This behaviour surprised me too. I've been getting to grips with Fortran's new(-ish) OO features but haven't yet needed to write final procedures. I think that I can provide an explanation, of sorts, for this behaviour. On p282 of Modern Fortran Explained the authors write: When a finalizable object is about to cease to exist (for example, by being ...


4

Re-write array declaration line as: REAL,DIMENSION(2,2) :: X = RESHAPE([1,2,3,4],[2,2]) The reason ifort compiled it the other way is non-standard implementation. This is a way you can initialize arrays of rank higher than 1.


4

The easiest way would be to have your Fortran program write to file, and have your Matlab program read those files for the information you want to plot. I do most of my number-crunching on Linux, so I'm not entirely sure how Windows handles one process writing a file and another reading it at the same time. That's a bit of a kludge though, so you might ...


3

Continuing the discussion of DISLIN as a solution, with an answer that won't fit into a comment... @M. S. B. - hello. I apologize for writing in your answer, but these comments are much too short, and answering a question in the form of an answer with an answer is ... anyway ... There is the Quick Plot feature of DISLIN -- routine QPLOT needs only three ...


3

This is a general Windows question. When a command is not recognized, you typically need to modify your PATH variable. Create a Windows batch file with a line such as set path=c:\foo;%path% where c:\foo is the directory of the ifort.exe executable.


3

For example: program zz character(20) :: ch = "1985-01-01-00:00" integer yyyy,mm,dd read(ch(1:4),'(i)') yyyy read(ch(6:7),'(i)') mm read(ch(9:10),'(i)') dd write(*,*) yyyy, mm, dd end program zz


3

When you call a subroutine which has assumed shape dummy arguments (as is the case in this program), an explicit interface is required. The easiest way to achieve this, is to put the subroutine in a module, and use the module in the main program.


2

You are shooting the messenger. The Compaq generated code also calls _chkstk(), the difference is that it inlined it. A common optimization. The key difference between the two snippets is: mov eax, 0D3668h vs sub esp, 233E4h The values you see used here are the amount of stack space required by the function. The Intel code requires 0xd3668 bytes ...


2

You wanted to write something like this: write(*,'(3f15.3,nvari(f9.2))') x, y, z, (var(i), i=1,nvari) In fact, there is an old trick in the Fortran standard that allows you to omit the nvari, thus: write(*,'(3f15.3,(f9.2))') x, y, z, (var(i), i=1,nvari) or even thus: write(*,'(3f15.3,f9.2)') x, y, z, (var(i), i=1,nvari) The standard says that the ...


2

You have declared the functions in C with the stdcall attribute. That Fortran compiler, without additional directives or compile options, does not use that calling convention. Get rid of the __stdcall keywords. There may be other differences as well. A far better way of ensuring that your Fortran and C code is interoperable is to use the Fortran 2003 ...


2

You need to compile the pieces of the program without linking first, then link them all together. So your command line will look like this: ifort /c s1.for ifort /c s2.for ifort /c s3.for ifort /c central.for where the /c is short for /compile-only; /nolink would also work. This will generate files s1.o, s2.o, s3.o, and central.o, respectively. The ...


2

Photran is the Fortran IDE plugin for Eclipse. It supports most widely used compilers, including the Intel Fortran compiler.


2

I do this all the time. What I do, is in the calling project (C#, VB.NET) I add the .dll output to the project as an existing item, with Add as Link option. Then I set it to copy if newer in the project tree. In the end it follows the binary when you compile it into the bin/Debug or bin/Release folders. With C# you then use the [DllImport()] ...


2

Dump Matlab because its proprietary, expensive, bloated/slow and codes are not easy to parallelize. What you should do is use something on the lines of DISLIN, PLplot, GINO, gnuplotfortran etc.


2

Intel ifort understands the C-style preprocessor directives, so it might be easiest to convert your files to that style. Then you would have a single code base that would work with both compilers. There would be some work regression testing the converted code with ifort.


1

g77 uses a different ABI than IVF, yes. So unless IVF has some g77/f2c compatibility option it's not going to work. The easiest solution for you is probably to use IVF to compile the libraries too.


1

Does dumpbin with symbol support enabled give you what you need?


1

You can learn about autovectorization and guided auto-parallelization features of Intel FORTRAN in this tutorial: http://software.intel.com/sites/products/documentation/hpc/composerxe/en-us/start/win/tutorial_comp_for_win.pdf. If you are doing linear algebra, solvers, FFTs, you might get best results if you map your problem into calls into the Intel Math ...


1

Your sample code have potential L2 cache issue, one can overcome it with blocking optimization. See Intel® Software Networks Forum answer for details: http://software.intel.com/en-us/forums/showthread.php?t=80041 Intel® Optimization Notice: Intel® compilers, associated libraries and associated development tools may include or utilize options that ...


1

It might be helpful to use standard Fortran 90 syntax, specifically in how you declare and initialize arrays. program main implicit none integer, dimension(3):: a, b ,c a=(/3, 4, 5/) b=(/1, 2, 3 /) call sub(a,b,c) write(*,*)'a+b = ',c end program main


1

i don't know much about fortran 90 (back in my day etc etc) but if you place that in a module it works. i get the impression that modules are needed for various "modern" fortran features. anyway, someone smarter (or younger?) than me can explain, but that should help you continue. module foo implicit none contains pure Subroutine XRotation (x, y, z, ...



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