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2

For l[k==1] and l[0 if k==1 else 1], you didn't time it long enough. The difference you saw is within what you'd get from random variation. I'm not sure which form is ultimately faster, but a longer trial showed the opposite effect: >>> timeit.timeit('l[k==1]', 'l=[1,2];k=1', number=100000000) 10.782931089401245 >>> timeit.timeit('l[0 if ...


0

The difference between boolean and integer division have been asked earlier. However, the (in)stability of it isn't discussed. Below, my scores: Python2 ~$ python2 -m timeit --setup "l=range(1000)" "l[False]" 10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0366 usec per loop ~$ python2 -m timeit --setup "l=range(1000)" "l[False]" 10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0332 usec per ...


-1

You can create a bit list by using a struct pointer. This will use more than a bit of space per bit written though, since it'll use one byte (for an address) per bit: struct bitfield{ unsigned int bit : 1; }; struct bitfield *bitstream; Then after this: bitstream=malloc( sizeof(struct bitfield) * numberofbitswewant ); You can access them like so: ...


0

Return is fairly special - it cannot be anything like a function since it's a tool to exit functions. Imagine this: if(1==1) return(); // say what?? If it was like this, return would have to be a function that does a "double exit", leaving not just its own scope but the caller's, too. Therefore return is nothing like an expression, it simply can't work ...



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