Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Try stopping the clip when the thread is interrupted, adding clip.close() to the catch clause that catches the interruptedException, like this: class sound implements Runnable { @Override public void run() { Clip clip = null; // take the declaration of the clip variable out of the try - catch try { ...


0

You don't need an input thread at all: the main thread can be used for this. To stop the Thread.sleep use Thread.interrupt(): public class crytask { public static void main(String args[]) { Runnable sound = new sound(); final Thread soundthread = new Thread(sound); soundthread.start(); System.out.println("Enter"); ...


0

Between atomic1() and atomic2() you do need to check for Thread.currentThread.isInterrupted() to cleanup in case of canceling. No need to throw an exception if you handle what is needed. As for progress tracking, you can create your own listener object in the Data plugin and allow passing it to the thread. the UI will instantiate it and pass tit to the ...


0

interrupt is not a C specified keyword, so whatever is discussed is not C specified behavior. Yes the compiler could see that etx_rcvd is modified inside an interrupt routine and therefore assume etx_rcvd could change at any time outside the interrupt function and make int etx_rcvd --> volatile int etx_rcvd. Now the question is should it do that? IMO: ...


0

Most cameras capture images on their own clock. You are then a slave, not a master: you don't trigger image capture. Instead, you're notified whenever a new image is available. Any of the camera APIs (OpenCV, Qt Multimedia, etc.) will allow you to be notified when new camera data is available. If an API doesn't have asynchronous notification, you can spin a ...


0

So, I'm posting it for someone who may have the same problem, one day. The problem was just the clock. Even if you have a special quartz, you need to define your system clock. AND, when your system clock is set, you have to define your peripheral clock, yes another one. But be carefull, not all peripheral pins work on the peripheral clock I think. So, I ...


0

I found the error. I was trying to load 5 sectors from the disk but there was only 3 in it.


1

The only one that can interrupt a thread is itself or the Task Scheduler. If you were to stop someone else you would need direct access to timer hardware. You can do what Ed Heal said. Use conditional variables and semaphores. My advice is to build up a linked list or even just an array storing what to do and who is the one wich should do it. See what ...


2

I can only offer advice from a Linux side, but as you said that was of interest too then... ... raise does the following (from the manual page): The raise() function sends a signal to the calling process or thread. So in a multi-threaded program it is the thread that calls raise that will get the signal. On Linux, for threading, you'll probably be ...


3

Typically after the first signal, signal handler is reset to SIG_DFL (Unix V signals) and the default behaviour for SIG_INT to exit the program. This is what you observe. So it would require to reinstall the handler again. Install it again in the handler: void signal_handler(int signal) { signal(SIGINT, signal_handler); printf("Received signal ...


0

My problem was actually solved by decreasing the PLL speed. My config is: /* HCLK = SYSCLK /1*/ RCC->CFGR |= (uint32_t)RCC_CFGR_HPRE_DIV1; /* PCLK2 = HCLK /1*/ RCC->CFGR |= (uint32_t)RCC_CFGR_PPRE2_DIV1; /* PCLK1 = HCLK /1*/ RCC->CFGR |= (uint32_t)RCC_CFGR_PPRE1_DIV1; /* PLL configuration */ RCC->CFGR &= ...


1

You are registering two different routines for the same interrupt (AVR32_USART2_IRQ), so that the second registration just overwrites the first one. Notice that there's only one IRQ/ISR for both RX and TX in the AT32UC and you'll have to determine which one occurred yourself in your ISR, see e.g. ...


2

It is perhaps surprising that catching an InterruptedException does not mean that the interrupted flag is set on the thread. The interrupted flag and InterruptedException are two completely separate ways of indicating that an interrupt has occurred: You can throw an InterruptedException without first checking whether the thread has been interrupted. You ...


0

There was two problem: 1- As i use Keil uVision i need to use __irq for defining interrupt service routine! 2- The surprising one is that the end of interrupts not fired! so use: *AT91C_AIC_EOICR = 0; void __irq Usart0IrqHandler (void) { volatile AT91PS_USART pUsart0 = AT91C_BASE_US0; // create a pointer to USART0 structure if ((pUsart0->US_CSR ...


0

The conditions of the if statements look suspicious if you are mimicking a PWM. Why is the pin of port B being tested? The bodies of the if statements will only be entered if the pin (button) is pressed with the correct frequency. Do you mean to set the pin on port B instead? Then you would want count = count + 1; if ((count > 5) && ...


0

First of all your cli() has no effect in your ISR. When an interrupt happens the I flag automatically cleared and restored at the end of ISR - so sei() is needless as well. However there is rational case when sei() inserted somewhere in the middle of an ISR service to let other ISR's to interrupt it. Though it is not beginner level to build such ...


0

Prior to setting the count (US_RCR) in the interrupt, you need to reinitialize the receive pointer: pUSART0->US_RPR = (unsigned int)Buffer; Your device is probably faulting because the PDC is writing outside the buffer.


3

The correct way to capture signals is with Signal.trap: Signal.trap('QUIT') do puts "Shutting down..." exit end Signal.trap('INT', 'IGNORE') The linked docs have some comments on OS differences, specifically: The list of available signal names and their interpretation is system dependent. Signal delivery semantics may also vary between systems; ...


5

All your flags should be declared volatile. eg: volatile int start_flag, sync_flag /*,other_flag ... */; else the compiler may optimise out checks for their value being changed by code outside the current block.


0

The /proc/interrupts file in Linux shows interrupt type, counts, handler registered for that interrupt. An example of /proc/interrupts is like this: 2287: 13 18 28 49 PCI-MSI-edge eth0:lsc 2288: 9141 136551 21455 238464 PCI-MSI-edge eth0:v7-Tx 2289: 48562 109176 24880 135639 ...


0

It's a bit late answer, but I faced today a similar problem I think this could help other people. First I doubt that the problem was that flags UIF, CC1IF, CC2IF, CC3IF, CC4IF are set or not set. If you check the Reference Manual on page 403 is written that those flags are set by the hardware, so when you reset them the hardware (which is running even when ...


0

Maybe the sleep timer is used by the portion of the HAL you've imported to your code. You might try using one of the other timers, not used by the BLE stack (I think 1,2 and 4 are available). Of course, you'll need to modify a different set of registers, for setting the counter value, and enabling the interrupt. For timer1, see T1IET and T1CC0L/H ( ...


2

Ordinarily a hardware interrupt will be executed immediately. On return, the tasklet will resume execution. It is possible and even common that a tasklet will disable interrupts during short critical sections while it manipulates shared data structures.


0

Taskelts can be interrupted by hardware interrupts. See, e.g this.


0

You can just create "void" socket for break serversocket.accept() Server side private static final byte END_WAITING = 66; private static final byte CONNECT_REQUEST = 1; while (true) { Socket clientSock = serverSocket.accept(); int code = clientSock.getInputStream().read(); if (code == END_WAITING /*&& ...


-1

It's not possible to stop a std::async out of the box... However, You can do this, pass a bool to terminate the is_prime method and throw an exception if there is a timeout: // future::wait_for #include <iostream> // std::cout #include <future> // std::async, std::future #include <chrono> // std::chrono::milliseconds ...


0

I think its not possible to safely interrupt running cycle from outside of cycle itself, so STL doesn't provide such a functionality. Of course, one could try to kill running thread, but it's not safe as may lead to resource leaking. You can check for timeout inside is_prime function and return from it if timeout happens. Or you can try to pass a reference ...


1

Interrupts aren't queued; the interrupt line is sampled on the penultimate cycle of each instruction and if it is active then, and I unset, then a jump to interrupt occurs next instead of a fetch/decode. Could the confusion be that IRQ is level triggered, not edge triggered, and is usually held high for a period, not a single cycle? So clearing I will cause ...


0

I would recommend avoiding a long-running function. While it may work in the short term, as your code grows it could become problematic. Instead, consider using a state machine, or system of state machines in your master loop, and using your ISR for a flag. This will reduce timing issues and allow you to manage more tasks at once.


0

It may not be the primary issue in your code, but the first thing that jumps out at me is the massive delay you have inside your interrupt service routine: ISR(INT0_vect) { _delay_ms(1000); //wait 1000 ms = 1 sec if (PORTB == 0x04){ PORTB = 0x00; } else { PORTB = 0x04; } } One full second is a very, very long time for a microcontroller to be ...


0

I can think of two problems you may be having. As was previously mentioned, you may want to try 'debouncing' your input signal. You may also want to check if your external input is floating; that is to say, does your input have a pullup or pulldown resistor attached, allowing the signal to be pulled high or low respectively when no signal is present? If ...



Top 50 recent answers are included