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-1

Here is a working variant from links above NSPredicate *intersectPredicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"SELF IN %@", @[@500, @400, @600]]; NSArray *intersect = [@[@200, @300, @400] filteredArrayUsingPredicate:intersectPredicate];


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One thing you could do is exploit the DataFrame.shift() method in order to find the differences. If you combine this with groupby, when grouping on the IDs then you will end up results as I see that you want them. The trick is though, you need a DataFrame that has a date/ID pair of every unique date and every unique ID in order for this to work. The process ...


0

Are you sure that all your parameters are !null? As for the math, you want ray-plane intersection. http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~gfx/Courses/2003/ImageSynthesis/papers/Acceleration/Fast%20MinimumStorage%20RayTriangle%20Intersection.pdf


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You are probably looking for the symmetric difference between all your tables. To solve that kind of problem without being too clever, you need a FULL OUTER JOIN ... USING: SELECT id FROM table_a FULL OUTER JOIN table_b USING(id) FULL OUTER JOIN table_c USING(id) FULL OUTER JOIN table_d USING(id) FULL OUTER JOIN table_e USING(id) ...


0

This solution will tell you which tables are missing rows for each ID: SELECT * FROM (SELECT id, 'table_a' AS table_name FROM table_a UNION ALL SELECT id, 'table_b' FROM table_b UNION ALL SELECT id, 'table_c' FROM table_c UNION ALL SELECT id, 'table_d' FROM table_d UNION ALL ...


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If I understand you correctly, you can use outer joins to determine which rows do not have matching primary (or unique) keys. For example, use a left join to find the the non-matching rows in table b in the following example: select a.id from a left join b on a.id=b.id where b.id is null conversely to find the non-matching rows in table a: select b.id ...


2

You can try the following query SELECT id, COUNT(id) as id_num FROM ( SELECT id FROM table_a UNION SELECT id FROM table_b UNION SELECT id FROM table_c UNION SELECT id FROM table_d UNION SELECT id FROM table_e ) GROUP BY id HAVING id_num <5


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Try this: SELECT id FROM ( SELECT id FROM table_a UNION SELECT id FROM table_b UNION SELECT id FROM table_c UNION SELECT id FROM table_d UNION SELECT id FROM table_e ) result WHERE id NOT IN ( select a.id from table_a a inner join table_b b on a.id = b.id inner join table_c c on a.id = c.id inner join table_d ...


0

Pandas indexes have an intersection method which you can use. If you have two Series, s1 and s2, then s1.index.intersection(s2.index) gives you the index values which are in both s1 and s2. You can then use this list of indexes to view the corresponding elements of a series. For example: >>> ixs = s1.index.intersection(s2.index) >>> ...


3

You could create a list of the unique elements in each of your four vectors and just return the duplicated elements, which are the elements appearing in two or more of the vectors: all.vals <- c(unique(a), unique(b), unique(cc), unique(d)) unique(all.vals[duplicated(all.vals)]) # [1] "UBE2Q1" "PCSK9" "ZDHHC11" "GMDS" "PPP2R3B" "C20orf117" ...


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This question is pretty old, but I noticed that while people were arguing sets vs. lists, that no one thought of using them together. Following Soravux's example, Worst case for lists: >>> timeit('bool(set(a) & set(b))', setup="a=list(range(10000)); b=[x+9999 for x in range(10000)]", number=100000) 100.91506409645081 >>> ...


1

For all (or at least almost all) of your standard-library-complexity questions, a good reference can answer this for you. In particular we get that std::find performs At most last - first applications of the predicate (operator< in this case) where first and last define your range to be searched. We also get that std::set_intersection performs At most ...


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std::set::find takes O(lg n), it's a binary search. So using a for loop together with find takes O(n lg n). std::set_intersection takes linear time: align the two sets to find their intersection (similar to the merge operation of mergesort).


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std::set is an ordered collection. There are faster methods (linear) for such collections (think mergesort).


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Here is a workaround. Convert your object of class spatial into a data.frame and perform a merge between two data.frames. Then, convert the merged data.frame back to an object of class spatial, but now there will be the intersected coordinates x, y and z. Here is the code: coo=matrix(1:15, 3,3) colnames(coo)=c("x", "y", "z") coo=as.data.frame(coo) ...


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If I understand you correctly, you want a recursive implementation for your intersection method. Basically, you want to iterate over a1 and check for each element, whether it is contained in a2. You can iterate over a1 using recursion: In each step, you remove the head of the list and check whether it is contained in a2, and then you addAll elements from ...


0

Please provide a example for your question. Lets translate your Mursel Objects to Integers, so every different mursel gets a different number. Lets say those are your lists. <1,2,3,4,5> <1,0,3,7,0> What should your method return ?


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Here is the working version of the code, based on the details provided in the question, important details are: Time slot granularity is in minutes, it can even be in seconds. It prints the final answer in 24 hour format. Time starts from 0 hours - 24 hours, so it prints the playing hours as 0-8, 10-12 and 21-24. Needs additional logic to remove the hours ...


1

Make an array of all the start and end times, including a +1 or a -1 depending whether each time is a start or end time. For your set of times, this gives you: [(08:00, +1), (10:00, -1), (17:00, +1), (21:00, -1), (12:00, +1), (21:00, -1)] Sort them: [(08:00, +1), (10:00, -1), (12:00, +1), (17:00, +1), (21:00, -1), (21:00, -1)] Do a running sum of the ...


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Following may help, you are talking about time range and when a team can play, also the intersection with other team. Currently as I see from the example minimum unit is 1 hour say 8-9, 9-10. Total time seems to be between 8 AM - 9 PM, it can be anything for that matter. If my understanding is correct. Now form ranges of minimum unit like 8-9, 9-10, 10-11 ...


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Partial answer for when the collections are already Sets. Sets.intersection is actually closer to what I wanted than I thought because its result is not precomputed. Instead, it's a view of the intersection that's computed on the fly. Take a look at the anonymous class returned by intersection: final Predicate<Object> inSet2 = Predicates.in(set2); ...


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Use ListUtils from org.apache.commons.collections if you do not want to modify existing list. ListUtils.intersection(list1, list2)


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retainAll will modify your list Guava doesn't have APIs for List (only for set) I found ListUtils very useful for this use case. Use ListUtils from org.apache.commons.collections if you do not want to modify existing list. ListUtils.intersection(list1, list2)


0

Use ListUtils from org.apache.commons.collections if you do not want to modify existing list. ListUtils.intersection(list1, list2)



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