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5

Using the pairs function from List::Util is a possible solution. #!/usr/bin/perl use strict; use warnings; use List::Util 'pairs'; my @a1 = ([1,4],[5,15],[16,20]); my @a2 = ([2,3],[6,14]); my @new = pairs sort {$a <=> $b} map {@$_} @a1, @a2; use Data::Dumper; print Dumper \@new; This prints $VAR1 = [ [ 1, 2 ...


2

Try this Select * from A where datediff(dd,date,getdate())% 7 = 0


2

I suggest to use this category. It is very helpful for what you are looking for. For example this line of code: NSString *displayString = [NSDate stringForDisplayFromDate:date]; produces the following kinds of output: - ‘3:42 AM’ – if the date is after midnight today - ‘Tuesday’ – if the date is within the last seven days - ‘Mar 1’ – if the date is ...


2

Assuming these are your data, you can display the frequencies using barplot. x <- c(1, 2, 21, 12, 0) names(x) <- c("1-3", "4-6", "7-10", "11-14", ">14") x # 1-3 4-6 7-10 11-14 >14 # 1 2 21 12 0 barplot(x) See also the documentation for function hist.


2

Use this Code - (void)applicationWillEnterForeground:(UIApplication *)application { [Timer invalidate]; Timer = nil; } - (void)applicationDidEnterBackground:(UIApplication *)application { NSLog(@"Background process is Start(EnterBackground)!"); __block UIBackgroundTaskIdentifier bgTask ; UIApplication *app = [UIApplication ...


1

It appears that you are adding ComboBoxItems directly to your ComboBox. A cleaner and safer approach than parsing strings would be to continue binding to SelectedItem, but to also bind the ItemsSource to a collection of integers. Then use the ItemTemplate property of the ComboBox to define how to render the integers if you are not satisfied with the ...


1

You should use this Convert.ToDouble(comboBox1.SelectedText) The comboBox1.SelectedItem corresponds to the selected item of the ComboBox control and not with the text of it, which is that you want. Specifically, the SelectedText property of a CombBox control Gets or sets the text that is selected in the editable portion of a ComboBox. as it is ...


1

Consider this scenario: (m1) |-3-| (m2) |--2--| (m3) |--1--| (m4) |-1-| (m5) |-2-| Your solution will proceed as such: {3} (First room created) {3, 2} (Two meetings at same time, second room needed) {3, 2, 1} (Three meetings at same time, third room needed) {3, 2, 1} (m1 is over so m4 goes into the 3-room) {3, 2, 1, 2} (Four meetings at ...


1

class Discount { public int DiscountID { get; set; } //You will need some Key field if you are storing these in a database. public DateTime issueDate { get; set; } public DateTime expirationDate { get; set; } public List<PeriodInterval> intervals { get; set; } public Discount(DateTime IssueDate, DateTime ExpirationDate) { ...


1

No Android iBeacon library supports that. You would need to go straight to BLE library from Android BLE stack. That is using BluetoothAdapter and startLeScan directly.


1

After retrieve your array using DateTime function. Just Plug n Play with the code. :) $retrieveArray = array('08:00','08:45','09:30','10:15','11:00','11:45'); // Sample Array, Assumed mentioned in Question. $final = array(); for ($i=0; $i < count($retrieveArray)-1; $i++) { $j = $i+1; $final[$i] = array($retrieveArray[$i], $retrieveArray[$j]); } ...


1

$previous = null; $dates = array(); foreach ($period as $dt) { $current = $dt->format("H:i"); if (!empty($previous)) { $show = new DateTime($current); $dates[] = array($previous, $show->format('H:i')); } $previous = $current; }


1

You should first sort the intervals by start time in ascending order and then apply only one for-loop to find out which intervals are overlapping. When using the single for-loop-solution you need to compare TWO neighbour intervals if they overlap or not. Of course you have to check the range condition of the loop, too, to pay attention for that you consider ...


1

Just call update right after you define it: var refInterval = window.setInterval('update()', 30000); // 30 seconds var update = function() { $.ajax({ type : 'POST', url : 'post.php', success : function(data){ $('.voters').html(data); }, }); }; update();


1

Consider using setTimeout instead - it's more reliable. setInterval timers can stack when the window doesn't have focus and then all run at once when it gets focus back again. Using setTimeout also ensures that you don't get multiple AJAX requests queued up if the first one blocks for some reason. To start the loop immediately, use an IIFE ("immediately ...


1

You can calculate the intervals with repeated calls of TIMESTAMPDIFF and TIMESTAMPADD: Example: SET @to = CAST('2014-10-03 12:00:00' AS DATETIME); SET @from = CAST('2011-05-12 13:12:44' AS DATETIME); -- get the full years SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF(YEAR, @from, @to); -- 3 -- get the months, without full years in between SELECT TIMESTAMPDIFF(MONTH, ...


1

You can store two values in each node: 1)int count[3] - how many there are 0, 1 and 2 in this node's segment. 2)int shift - shift value(initially zero). The operations are performed in the following way(I use pseudo code): add_one(node v) v.shift += 1 v.shift %= 3 propagate(node v) v.left_child.shift += v.shift v.left_child.shift %= 3 ...


1

It seems that you never have to care about the values of the elements, only their values modulo 3. Keep a segment tree, using lazy updates as you suggest. Each node knows the number of things that are 0, 1, and 2 modulo 3 (memoization). Each update hits log(n) nodes. When an update hits a node, you remember that you have to update the descendants (lazy ...


1

Since there is not an exact solution for the topic: => SELECT date_part('epoch', INTERVAL '1 day 01:30:00') * INTERVAL '1 second' hours; hours ----------- 25:30:00 (1 row) Source: Documetation



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