Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

203

That part is written to stderr, use 2> to redirect it. For example: foo > stdout.txt 2> stderr.txt or if you want in same file: foo > allout.txt 2>&1 Note: this works in (ba)sh, check your shell for proper syntax


80

>> /dev/null redirects standard output (stdout) to /dev/null, which discards it. (The >> seems sort of superfluous, since >> means append while > means truncate and write, and either appending to or writing to /dev/null has the same net effect. I usually just use > for that reason.) 2>&1 redirects standard error (2) to ...


56

All POSIX operating systems have 3 streams: stdin, stdout, and stderr. stdin is the input, which can accept the stdout or stderr. stdout is the primary output, which is redirected with >, >>, or |. stderr is the error output, which is handled separately so that any exceptions do not get passed to a command or written to a file that it might break; normally, ...


55

You can use one-line heredoc cat <<< "This is coming from the stdin" the above is the same as cat <<EOF This is coming from the stdin EOF or you can redirect output from a command, like diff <(ls /bin) <(ls /usr/bin) or you can read as while read line do echo =$line= done < some_file or simply echo something | read ...


30

The compiler warnings happen on stderr, not stdout, which is why you don't see them when you just redirect make somewhere else. Instead, try this: $make &> results.txt The & means "redirect stdout and stderr to this location".


24

no need to launch sub shell. Use a code block will do as well. { time ls; } 2> out.txt or { time ls > /dev/null 2>&1 ; } 2> out.txt


20

From perldoc -f open: open STDOUT, '>', "foo.out" The docs are your friend...


19

Use another file descriptor { command1 2>&3 | command2; } 3>&1 1>&2 | command3 You can use up to 7 other file descriptors: from 3 to 9. If you want more explanation, please ask, I can explain ;-) Test { { echo a; echo >&2 b; } 2>&3 | sed >&2 's/$/1/'; } 3>&1 1>&2 | sed 's/$/2/' output: b2 a1 ...


17

You were close /my/bash/script <<< 'This string will be sent to stdin.' For multiline input, here-docs are suited: /my/bash/script <<STDIN -o other --options line 1 line 2 STDIN Edit To the comments: To achieve binary input, say xxd -r -p <<BINARY | iconv -f UCS-4BE -t UTF-8 | /my/bash/script 0000 79c1 0000 306f 0000 3061 0000 ...


15

PS <= 23.0 doesnt support this An example workaround is: Get-Content test.full | .\test_cfdp.exe | tee test.log


15

You can't use stdout redirection in the command line passed to CreateProcess. To redirect stdout you need to specify a file handle for the output in the STARTUPINFO structure. You are also making another, more subtle, mistake. The second parameter, lpCommandLine must point to writeable memory because CreateProcess overwrites the buffer. If you happen to be ...


15

This is the way to execute a program quietly, and hide all its output. /dev/null is a special filesystem object that throws away everything written into it. Redirecting a stream into it means hiding an output. The 2>&1 part means "redirect both the output and the error streams". Even if your program writes to stderr, that output will not be shown.


14

you can redirect the time output using, (time ls) &> file Because you need to take (time ls) as a single command so you can use braces.


14

This will redirect both STDOUT and STDERR to the same file: some_command 2>&1 | tee file.log Example $ touch foo; ls foo asfdsafsadf 2>&1 | tee file.log ls: asfdsafsadf: No such file or directory foo $ cat file.log ls: asfdsafsadf: No such file or directory foo


14

Sorry for the extremely long answer; I have a feeling that I'll need to refer to this method several dozen times in my life, so I'll write "one answer to rule them all". I'll first babble a little about files, file descriptors, (named) pipes, and output redirection, and then answer your question. Consider this simple C99 program: #include <stdio.h> ...


14

You're looking for stat macros: import os, stat mode = os.fstat(0).st_mode if stat.S_ISFIFO(mode): print "stdin is piped" elif stat.S_ISREG(mode): print "stdin is redirected" else: print "stdin is terminal"


13

See wget download options: ‘-O file’ ‘--output-document=file’ The documents will not be written to the appropriate files, but all will be concatenated together and written to file. If ‘-’ is used as file, documents will be printed to standard output, disabling link conversion. (Use ‘./-’ to print to a file literally named ‘-’.) ...


13

Use tee: ./child | tee file tee will copy its standard input to any file on the command line and to standard output as well.


12

In a bourne shell: make > my.log 2>&1 I.e. > redirects stdout, 2>&1 redirects stderr to the same place as stdout


12

This is what I've just googled and I remember myself using this some time ago... Use exec to redirect both standard output and standard error of all commands in a script: #!/bin/bash logfile=$$.log exec > $logfile 2>&1 For more redirection magic check out Advanced Bash Scripting Guide - I/O Redirection :)


12

I object the above answer and provide my own. csh DOES have this capability and here is how it's done: xxx |& some_exec # will pipe merged output to your some_exec or xxx |& cat > filename


11

You can redirect output using the Run dialog, Common tab, "Standard Input and Output" section. However, it doesn't look like you can redirect input as far as I can tell (and as far as this Stack Overflow question can tell, too). How much control do you have over your application? If you don't mind a bit of a hack, you could have a couple of properties or ...


11

I don't think csh has this capability, it's never been known for its extensive ability to manipulate file handles in the redirection process. You can redirect both standard output and error to a file with: xxx >& filename but that's not quite what you were after. However, given the paucity of redirection capabilities, it may be all you can do. ...


10

First of all stdin is file descriptor 0 (zero) rather than 1 (which is stdout). You can duplicate file descriptors or use filenames conditionally like this: [[ some_condition ]] && exec 3<$filename || exec 3<&0 some_long_command_line <&3


10

Redirection is made by the command line interpreter, in windows it is cmd.exe To debug the application, just launch a cmd.exe with propers arguments to launch your application and redirect the output, for example: cmd.exe /c "yourapplication.exe >redirect.txt" To make this happen from inside IDE in order to debug, configure cmd.exe as the host application ...


10

For bash, you can use the line: exec &>/dev/null This will direct all stdout and stderr to /dev/null from that point on. It uses the non-argument version of exec. Normally, something like exec xyzzy would replace the program in the current process with a new program but you can use this non-argument version to simply modify redirections while ...


10

You can do this with "cat" and a here-document. cat <<EOF > test.txt some text EOF One reason for doing this would be to avoid any possibility of a password being visible in the output of ps. However, in bash and most modern shells, "echo" is a built-in command and it won't show up in ps output, so using something like this is safe (ignoring any ...


10

This is an effect of buffering. When outputting to a terminal, Perl (just as stdio) uses line based buffering, which will give the expected effect. When outputting to a file, it uses block buffering (typically 4k or 8k blocks), hence it will only flush on program end. The difference you're observing is because STDERR is unbuffered, unlike most other ...


9

bash -c 'cmd >output.file 2>error.file' >bash_output.file 2>&1



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible