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4

From the fscanf() manpage: "The value EOF is returned if an input failure occurs before any conversion (such as an end-of-file) occurs." Here's a hint... EOF isn't equal to 0. Your while-loop never terminates.


4

You did not post your Student.java, so I am guessing here. Is there a field of type java.util.Scanner in the Student class? If there is, delete it, or mark it as transient: private transient Scanner someField; The transient modifier will prevent the field from being serialized.


3

You don't need to write a program to do this, one already exists. cat foo.nc bar.nc > foobar.nc bar.nc will be concatenated onto the end of foo.nc in foobar.nc. This works with binary and textual data. If you want to add to an existing file: cat foo.nc >> bar.nc foo.nc will be added to the end of bar.nc. See man cat for more information.


3

For loading and saving text in/from a JTextComponent, see read(Reader,Object) & write(Writer). For detecting changes to a JTextField add an action listener (that will typically fire when the user presses the enter key), or a DocumentListener.


3

Following lines in the except block overwrites f causing open file to be closed. with open("log_readFile.txt","a") as f: f.write(str(e)) f.write("\n") Change the name f for the file for appending to another name will solve the problem: with open("log_readFile.txt", "a") as logf: logf.write(str(e)) logf.write("\n")


3

print() takes separate arguments, file.write() does not. You can reuse print() to write to your file instead: with open('result.txt', 'a', encoding='utf-8') as outf: for k in main_dic: s = 0 print('stem:', k, file=outf) print('word forms and frequencies:', file=outf) for w in main_dic[k]: print('%-10s ==> ...


3

Async IO is thread-less. There is no thread being created or blocked. That is the entire point of using async IO! What would it help you to unblock one thread and block another? The internals of this have been discussed many times. Basically, the OS notifies the CLR when the IO is done. This causes the CLR to queue the completion callback you specified onto ...


2

The last line has not the same amount of elements as the other lines. After splitting the last line, you try to access fields of the array, that do not exist. That is indicated by the exception http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException.html. Before you access the fields of the array, you have to check if there is the ...


2

perhaps os.system("hello.exe > test.txt") alternatively subprocess.Popen("hello.exe",stdout=open("test.txt","w")).communicate("\n")


2

You need a Writer and a save button or something else to trigger the save operation: final BufferedWriter bufferedWriter = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(myFile)); try { bufferedWriter.write(text); } catch (final IOException exception) { // Error handling. } finally { bufferedWriter.close(); ...


2

Although the question shows little effort I am reminded how I started out with no knowledge about input or output whatsoever, it is a quite dense forest of information really. Basically to read a file you need to: Open the file Read the file and assign it to a variable Close the file Some functions in MatLab take care of all three steps: importdata ...


2

There are multiple layers of buffering. If you call write, no application layer buffering will occur. If you look at the file from another process you will see the data, but that does not mean they have been committed to disk, because there is a layer of buffering happening in the kernel. Since the kernel is handling the access from the other process, it ...


2

When the outer while loop is executed the first time, n_skip is set to 2. However, when you execute while(n_skip > 0) { in_file >> tmpword; n_skip--; } n_skip gets set to 0 and is never reset to 2. Add a line n_skip = 2; after the line in_file.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n'); to ...


2

Consulting the javadoc for FileInputStream (I'm assuming since you're reading from file): Reads up to len bytes of data from this input stream into an array of bytes. If len is not zero, the method blocks until some input is available; otherwise, no bytes are read and 0 is returned. The key here is that the method only blocks until some data is ...


2

If the running user is the logon user (with profil loading) and have already access to the remote path (by entering credentials), your application, which may run with user's profile loaded, should access to the UNC path without any login. Otherwise, you can use this piece of code to logon you can find in GitHub : using (UNCAccessWithCredentials unc = new ...


2

Test with this, it must be faster than the original C++. Changes are: Eliminated the vector words to save the words (there will be saved already in word_count). Eliminated the set unique_words (in word_count are only the unique words). Eliminated the second copy to words, not needed. Eliminated the sort of the words (the order was updated in the map, now ...


2

Your code is not even calling fstat. You're calling stat but passing a FILE pointer to it rather than a pathname. You need to either do: stat(fname1, &buf1); or: fstat(fileno(fp1), &buf1); This mistake should have produced an error (or at least a warning) from the compiler. Also, you should be checking the return value of stat or fstat.


1

std::vector<std::string> words; /* Extract words from the input file, splitting on whitespace */ while (std::cin >> str) { words.push_back(str); } This requires constantly repeating allocate/copy/free operations as the vector grows. Either pre-allocate the vector or use something like a list.


1

You have to give the DrStrange namespace to have it work. namespace \normalPpl; use wtf\isWrongHere\DrStrange; class ThisHasNoLogic { public function __constructor(DrStrange $strange){ //here be dragons } } Given you have a good autoload (see psr-4 or php spl_autoload )


1

Short answer: You cannot change the limit. You have to read a chunk of data, save it in a buffer, read another chunk, append it to that buffer, and so on until you've received the entire message. Longer answer: The maximum record size is 16384 (2^14) because it's defined that way by the standard. For example, for TLS 1.2, that is rfc5246. The record ...


1

You increment bytes before you check for EOF, so you have an off-by-one error. However, reading a file byte by byte is a slow way of finding its size. Using standard C, you may be able to use ftell() — if you're on a 64-bit Unix-like machine. Otherwise, you're working too close to the values that will fit in 32-bit values. Using a plain int for bytes is ...


1

You're working way too hard. I'll assume your OS is Windows or Linux. On Windows, _stat will get the exact length of a file. In Linux it's stat. Both will do this from file system information, so it's almost instantaneous. On Windows, _chsize will extend the file to any number of bytes. On Linux it's ftruncate. The OS will be writing zeros to the ...


1

There is a mix of two GUI frameworks, AWT (Frame, Button) Swing (JLabel) Best to pick the newer swing. The start: public class SlideShow extends JFrame { public static void main(String[] args) { EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() { @Override public void run() { new SlideShow().setVisible(true); }}); } ...


1

You can serialize an object only if all of its class members are also implementing Serializable. As RobAu mentioned, Scanner is not serializeable. You can find a good tutorial here: http://www.vogella.com/tutorials/JavaSerialization/article.html All fields marked with transient will not be serialized. See here for more details: Use of serializable and ...


1

There is an Object Students in your this.list that references the Scanner. Remove the reference and you will be fine.


1

Thanks to the help of "kocko", the following setup works as expected, only annotation config: @Bean(name = "errors") public PropertiesFactoryBean mapper() { PropertiesFactoryBean bean = new PropertiesFactoryBean(); bean.setLocation(new ClassPathResource("errors.properties")); return bean; } @Resource(name = "errors") private Properties errors; ...


1

You can first declare the properties files as a such, by using <util:properties> in your Spring configuration: <util:properties id="messages" location="classpath:app.properties" /> This registers a bean with name messages, which you can autowire/inject in other beans. @Autowired @Qualifier("messages") private Properties props; More info: ...


1

Either using IOUtils.toInputStream("") or new ByteArrayInputStream(new byte[0]) may work. The latter would certainly provide an empty stream, but it may make your code fail because there isn't an empty line to read - there's no line terminator. For example: import java.io.*; import java.util.*; public class Test { public static void main(String[] ...


1

Short answer: You don't care. Long answer: There is no thread. More exactly, there is no thread for each of the asynchronous request you create. Instead, there's a bunch of I/O threads on the thread pool, which are mostly "waiting" on IOCP - waiting for the kernel to wake them up when data is available. The important point is that each of these can ...


1

the code seems ok... do you have an empty newline at the end? while ((sCurrentLine = br.readLine()) != null){ if (sCurrentLine.isEmpty() || sCurrentLine.startsWith(";")) // skip empty and comment lines continue; String[] values = sCurrentLine.split("\\t"); // are you sure the -1 is required? ... }



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