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1

The inefficiency here is in Microsoft's implementation of std::getline, which is being used in two places in the code. The key problems with it are: It reads from the stream one character at a time It appends to the string one character at a time The profile in the original post shows that the second of these problems is the biggest issue in this case. ...


0

I hate character encodings... I believe the following blog might help you here i will post the code here just in case that site has issues in the future though, NOTE I DID NOT WRITE THIS NOR DO I TAKE CREDIT. // Create a hashtable to hold the characters to convert Hashtable<String, String> replace = new Hashtable<String, String>(); // The ...


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You can use write: library(RJSONIO) list1 <- vector(mode="list", length=2) list1[[1]] <- c("a", "b", "c") list1[[2]] <- c(1, 2, 3) exportJson <- toJSON(list1) > exportJson [1] "[\n [ \"a\", \"b\", \"c\" ],\n[ 1, 2, 3 ] \n]" write(exportJson, "test.json") library("rjson") json_data <- fromJSON(file="test.json") > ...


0

"16-bit Unicode character" is a redundant synonym for a Java char. A char is an unsigned 16-bit value, and as you have surmised, a sequence of chars is a UTF-16-encoded string. The phrase "Data dealt with is 16-bit Unicode characters" refers to the fact that a Reader or Writer only reads or writes char values (or ints which hold char values). Encoding is ...


3

New lines vary depending on your operating system. You can do this in several ways, the simplist for your current code is to use b.newLine(). b.newLine() will select the correct characters to use for your current platform and write it to the output. Another option is to get the characters to use from System.getProperty("line.separator"), that will ...


0

I see a few problems: You're getting IndexOutOfBounds because you increment rows when it's already the size of the array. You should count the number of lines in the file before creating the 2D array int rows = 0; while (reader.readLine() != null) rows++; Have a separate counter for the current row You set myArray to a new matrix every iteration of the ...


0

You seem to know the number of lines before you read the file. Therefore there's no need to recreate the array every time you read the line. Simply parse line by line and start the index with 0. package test2.newpackage; import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.FileReader; import java.io.IOException; import java.util.Arrays; public class NewMain { ...


1

Rows also begins at 6 and increases - this leads to your index out of bounds error, as you wouldn't be able to access that value.


0

“Data dealt with is 16-bit Unicode characters” means that the data is 16−bit code units. Each unit is either a surrogate code unit or a represents a character in Basic Multilingual Plane (BMP), in the range U+0000 to U+FFFF. A surrogate code unit as such does not represent anything; only a pair of surrogate code units may have a meaning, denoting a character ...


0

The only thing the computer knows are 1s and 0s. Specifying encoding is your way of telling the JVM how to "interpret" or "decrypt" the 1s and 0s. If you use UTF-16 encoding on an InputStream of UTF 8 data, your "decryption" algorithm will obviously not match the "encryption" algorithm, and you will get funny characters all over the place.


0

<form id="frm1 method="post" should be <form id="frm1" method="post" missing one " and <td align="center"" colspan="1">Intermediate Variables</td> should be <td align="center" colspan="1">Intermediate Variables</td> has extra " after align Hope this helps


1

IO.File.Create(Input(3) creates or overwrites the file and returns a FileStream. From MSDN: The FileStream object created by this method has a default FileShare value of None; no other process or code can access the created file until the original file handle is closed. You can rewrite it as follows, Dim str As String = WC.DownloadString(Input(2)) ...


1

Here is the code ,read file first and then increment it and store again - BufferedWriter out = null; try { // Read File Contents - score BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("c:\\a.txt")); String storedScore="0"; int storedScoreNumber = 0; while ((storedScore = br.readLine()) != null) { ...


0

Have a singleton data accessor with a queue so that it is the only one manipulating the file. If necessary acknowledge to client threads after the write.


1

(Do some research before asking a question) There's a lots of tutorials on the web to do this, here's an example : Open, read, write in a file If you want to do operations after, you need to convert char to int for example, lots of functions do this too. I suggest you to see : atoi You will maybe also need to parse your file, check this link : Parse a ...


0

_beginthread(*readDataFromPort,0,NULL); This snippet starts the thread regardless of SetComMask outcome, but if you are reading OK must have worked. Check out MSDN threaded port read/write which works (VC5 compile worked straight off out of the box) above code looks really similar though, is it same?.


0

You need to allocate memory to receive the text, and you need to make sure the data type of the text buffer matches the data type you use for writing to the file. Neither of which you are doing. Try something more like this: HWND hEdit = GetDlgItem(hWnd, EDIT_MAIN); int len = GetWindowTextLengthA(hEdit); std::vector<CHAR> text(len+1, 0); ...


1

files contains only the file names, not the entire path. The path to the file can be obtained by joining the file name and the root: scriptFile = open(os.path.join(root, a), "r") You might want to have a look at https://docs.python.org/2/library/os.html#os.walk


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You'll need to prepend the root directory to your filename scriptFile = open(root + '/' + a, 'r')


1

From the error message I assume you are using Windows. Then, you have to use \ as a folder separator: call system('mkdir out\test') Also, -p (the Unix option to create parent folders) is invalid for Windows (and also not required).


0

It depends. Here are two guesses from the top of my head. Your ram could be getting fragmented which results in a lot of relocations, or your hardware driver may be loading the cpu a lot. Is your filesystem local at all? Are other applications affected? Can you provide further details?


1

The speed difference that you are noticing is because of the 4s sleep that appears in both test cases. In the non-NIO case, which has one thread per request, sleeping for 4 seconds only blocks that one request. However in the NIO case, which has a far smaller number of worker threads, it blocks that request and every other request that is waiting to run ...


1

See javadoc: abstract pathname = File An optional system-dependent prefix string, such as a disk-drive specifier, "/" for the UNIX root directory, or "\\" for a Microsoft Windows UNC pathname, and A sequence of zero or more string names. [refering to directories and file These are independent of operating system peculiarities of notation. The string ...


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The abstract pathname is just the string form of the file/location held in the File object. If you check the javadoc of File#toString(): Returns the pathname string of this abstract pathname. This is just the string returned by the getPath() method.


2

An abstract pathname is a java.io.File object and a pathname string is a java.lang.String object. Both reference the same file on the disk. How do I know? The first sentence of the Javadoc of java.io.File explains: An abstract representation of file and directory pathnames. It goes on to explain why: User interfaces and operating systems use ...


0

There is no direct access to the file size from HttpURLConnection You can use the nio cache under your file stream In a one-time generated file.


0

You need to tell it how many bytes it can read. This is to prevent the read() method copy data over memory that it shouldn't. You should therefore pass the size of the buffer. In the code above this will be 1024. You may want to use private static int BUFFER_SIZE = 1024 and use this constant in both the new and read() so that if you change the size of ...


0

You don't really need to provide byteCount for read method. Using is.read(buffer)) will simply read out 1024 bytes (since defined by the length of your buffer array) at every round till -1 is returned.


0

try this import re text_file = open("corrected_clients_data.txt", "r") text = text_file.read() matches=re.findall(r'\"(.+?)\"',text) text_file.close() if you notice the question mark(?) indicates that we have to stop reading the string at the first ending double quotes encountered. hope this is helpful.


2

You can do that more easily using re.findall and using \d instead of 0 to make it more general: import re s = '''ClientsName(0) = "SUPERBRAND": ClientsName(1) = "GREATSTUFF": cClientsNames.Add Key:="SUPER", Item:=ClientsName''' >>> print re.findall(r'ClientsName\(\d\) = "([^"]*)"', s) ['SUPERBRAND', 'GREATSTUFF'] Another thing you must note is ...


0

You can use re.findall and just take the first two matches: >>> s = '''ClientsName(0) = "SUPERBRAND": ClientsName(1) = "GREATSTUFF": cClientsNames.Add Key:="SUPER", Item:=ClientsName''' >>> re.findall(r'\"([^"]+)\"' , s)[:2] ['SUPERBRAND', 'GREATSTUFF']


0

Use a lookbehind to get the value of ClientsName(0) and ClientsName(1) through re.findall function, >>> import re >>> str = '''ClientsName(0) = "SUPERBRAND": ClientsName(1) = "GREATSTUFF": cClientsNames.Add Key:="SUPER", Item:=ClientsName''' >>> m = re.findall(r'(?<=ClientsName\(0\) = \")[^"]*|(?<=ClientsName\(1\) = ...


0

file_get_contents only loads the data from the file in memory, while both readfile and cat also output the data on the screen, so they just perform more operations. If you want to compare file_get_contents to the others, add echo before it Also, you are not freeing the memory allocated for $foo. There is a chance that if you move the file_get_contents as ...


0

Originally I thought to use the code based on the http://www.javaworld.com/article/2077523/build-ci-sdlc/java-tip-26--how-to-improve-java-s-i-o-performance.html article, but then I figured out that there are quite some bugs in (e.g: the interaction between truncate and the buffer; or the computation of the filePointer which was not correct either) and above ...


0

PipedInputStream pipedInputStream = new PipedInputStream(); PipedOutputStream pipedOutputStream = new PipedOutputStream(); pipedOutputStream.connect(pipedInputStream); //writing ObjectOutputStream objectOutputStream = new ObjectOutputStream(pipedOutputStream); //ObjectOutputStream objectOutputStreamWrapper =new ObjectOutputStream(objectOutputStream); ...


3

Try this code: The csv filenames are generated using datatable name: public void GenerateCSVfiles(DataSet dataSets) { //create csv file StreamWriter sw = null; StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); foreach (DataTable dataTable in dataSets.Tables) { sw = new StreamWriter(string.Format(@"C:\Temp\{0}.csv", dataTable.TableName)); ...


8

By far the most expensive thing you could ever do with a disk is to force the reader head to move from one track to another. It is a mechanical motion, the typical cost is about 13 milliseconds per track. You are moving the reader head, constantly having to go back and forth from one file to another. Buffering is required to reduce that cost, in other ...


0

Try using .NET Transactional File Manager TxFileManager fileMgr = new TxFileManager(); using (TransactionScope scope1 = new TransactionScope()) { fileMgr.DeleteDirectory(path); scope1.Complete(); }


0

It seems that you are trying to use File.OpenWrite with a directory, while the function is supposed to take a file as an argument.


4

Ah. So I think I misunderstood the question.... sorry. I had thought you wanted to run gunzip and then one other internal filter, and wanted to do that 'N' times. It seems what you really want to do is run many stages of filters, one after the other... some using external commands and some (perhaps ?) internal to the program. Hence the desire to manage ...


0

Minor problem: Do not use feof(fp), instead use: while (1) { ... int ch = fgetc(fp); if (ch == EOF) break; data_arr[0] = ch; ch = fgetc(fp); if (ch == EOF) break; data_arr[1] = ch; Larger issue: I suspect your input file, though open as "rb" is changing as you read it. Perhaps you do not have an exclusive lock on it.


2

Regarding the part 'How to manage two or more consumers via pthreads?' of your post let me cite these points about 'Designing Threaded Programs': In general though, in order for a program to take advantage of Pthreads, it must be able to be organized into discrete, independent tasks which can execute concurrently. For example, if routine1 and ...


1

You can use rawConnection function e.g. : # this in-memory ASCII .RData contains: a = 123 and b = 456 rDataInMem <- "RDA2 A 2 134915 131840 1026 1 262153 1 a 14 1 123 1026 1 262153 1 b 14 1 456 254 " # executing this line should appear a = 123 and b = 456 in the workspace load(file=rawConnection(object=charToRaw( rDataInMem ),open='r'))


1

You should be calling ObjectInputStream.defaultReadObject() in your readObject() method. Not ObjectInputStream.readObject().


1

Check your files properties. If the read-only is checked, uncheck it. This was my personal issue with the UnauthorizedAccessException.


1

Try Cell(a,b).Value instead of just Cell(a,b). Also, the following approach should work Excel.Range objRange = (Excel.Range)objSheet.Cells[rowN,colN]; variableName = objRange.get_Value(System.Missing.Type).ToString(); You may modify it for your datatype


1

The fact that Haskell explicitly disallows this behavior is precisely what makes it so valuable -- you can't mix pure and IO-riddled code. The magical <- operator is syntactic sugar for monadic binding. For example, your original function can be rewritten explicitly with the >>= operator (pronounced "bind"): main = do n <- getLine putStrLn ...


4

You should read about monads (and IO monad) A good start here The problem is you must to "extract" the value from your monad and this is not "exactly" a function call. Your first code is correct, you extract some value from monad readedString <- getLine and then, use it putStrLn $ "Readed: " ++ readedString you can avoid "naming line" but, in ...


11

Even on Windows the standard implementation of files in System.IO uses a file descriptor, not a win32 HANDLE. These file descriptors are provided by the C runtime, not Windows. To convert a HANDLE to a file descriptor the runtime provides the _open_osfhandle function. GHC uses MinGW on Windows but MinGW doesn't provide its own C runtime, so Haskell EXEs ...


0

Here is a slightly longer character-based approach, which conditions on whether the first character in a line is ( or not. If it is (, then we consume everything up to and including the next newline without outputting. If it not, then we do the same thing but we output the characters as we read them. #include <stdio.h> int main(){ FILE *file ...



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