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0

if strArr is null, and you call .split on it, it will throw a null pointer. You can check if null before using .split. String strArr; for(int x=0;x<=m;x++){ // m is the number of lines to parse strArr = bufReader.readLine(); if (strArr != null) { String[] vals=strArr.split("\\s+ "); System.out.println(strArr); ...


0

After much research the answer I've come up with is you can't make objectinput/output any faster without doing it yourself. Because of the structure of my data one iList will have many of one type of iSet which has multiple objects with the data residing in the object. So I write all of my objects to a .txt file and when I need to restore the object I read ...


3

What you are asking for is impossible in Haskell. One of the fundamental rules behind Haskell's design is compositionality: the meaning of an expression depends exclusively on the meaning of its subexpressions and how they are combined. The only exception is that the meaning of a variable depends on context. What you're asking for, fundamentally, is to ...


2

Could you help me to find the correct one for Java 6? Pass. (Off-topic) Or I can just totally skip that section? Nope. I would advise that you revise based on the Java 7 tutorial. I don't want to end mixing up Java 6 and Java 7 features. I wouldn't worry about it. If that is a concern, you can: Check the javadocs to see if the relevant ...


0

you could use rs232 to output this data to a computer. I think there are some ip available for rs232 you could use. Also in a more advanced way you could attach the reaults memory to a avalon-mm bus and read it through systemconsole using some tcl code.


0

Definitely scale results, check out my Character Histogram that does a horizontal scaling histogram. Also, you could benefit a y-axis label. It's hard to tell which bar is for which kind of word length. I have no idea which bar is for what word length. I added this code right before you display the histogram, it basically halves every value, which does ...


0

You will need to create an SMM driver that traps specific I/O ranges, generating SMIs, which will route these accesses to your driver. Values written to the trapped I/O ranges can be retrieved from the CPU Save State area by your driver and processed accordingly by your emulated device's state machine. Values that the OS reads from the trapped I/O range will ...


0

You probably should try noncached IO. In this case, your intent will be fully passed through to the underlying block level drivers. Priority is a hint after all.


0

No this would not be working by means of standard input. That is not meaningful for Android applications (stdin, stdout, and stderr exist, but are normally unused). Rather, Android has it's own input processing structure, see for example: https://source.android.com/devices/input/overview.html Chances are that your reader is a USB HID device which android ...


0

I suspect that if you talked to any SFTP server software author, he'd tell you that interacting with named pipes through SFTP isn't supported, and that you're on your own. Having said that, you could try requesting append mode for the put operation: OutputStream strm = sftpChannel.put(remoteFile, ChannelSftp.APPEND); ...


2

It seems that words are printed only if there is a space after them: if (ch == ' ') { .... cout << "\x1b[34;1mWORD: " << word << "\x1b[0m" << end; .... } This is not the case for the numbers in the given test.


0

The problem seems to have resolved itself by simply changing the point where the stream position is set: writerStream.Flush(); writerStream.Position = 0; storedFile = new Byte[writerStream.Length]; writerStream.Read(storedFile, 0, Convert.ToInt32(writerStream.Length)); In the previous code ...


3

If you want to do something with file2 for every line of file1, then foreach PropLine [split [read $FID1] \n] { foreach GMprop [split [read $FID2] \n] { puts $outFID "$PropLine $GMprop"; } # jump back to the start of the file, so you can re-read it # for the next iteration of the outer foreach loop seek $FID2 0 start } But, it ...


0

I`ve struggled for hours and finally found a solution. The problem is script somehow could not change encoding of files if you do not specify the original file encoding. So for my case: def copyfile_inUTF8(self,orig_file,copy_file): import chardet raw_data=open(orig_file,'r').read() target_en='utf-8' #detect sourcefile encoding ...


1

filenames = [] files = [open(f, mode='r') for f in filenames] for line in files[0]: lines = [file.readline() for file in files] process(lines)


2

What about this? from itertools import izip_longest for file_lines in izip_longest(*map(open,filenames)): for line in file_lines: if line: # process line


1

This will read both the files line by line at a time with open('File1','r') as FileA, open('File2','r') as FileB: for lineA,lineB in zip(FileA,FileB): print lineA,lineB


1

lines = [next(fo) for fo in fileobjs] process(lines)


9

And as a slightly meta-ish answer, the overarching fix is always compiling with warnings enabled: $ gcc t.c -Wall t.c: In function ‘main’: t.c:7:5: warning: suggest parentheses around assignment used as truth value [-Wparentheses] while (ch = getchar() != '\n') ^ t.c:12:1: warning: control reaches end of non-void function [-Wreturn-type] } ^ ...


1

You have to use ROM IP and specify your .mif.


3

You have to save the original System.out somewhere. System.setOut() modifies System.out, so you're essentially doing System.out = System.out; which of course does nothing.


5

Because you need to write it as while ((ch = getchar()) != '\n')


27

(ch = getchar() != '\n') should be rewritten as ((ch = getchar()) != '\n') Because != binds tighter than = in C operator precedence table. Operator are not ordered from left to right (reading direction of english) as one might expect. For example result of 2 + 3 * 5 is 17 and not 25. This is because * will be performed before performing +, because * ...


8

You need to be aware of operator precedence - comparison operators such as != have a higher precedence than assignment (=). Use parentheses to enforce the required behaviour, i.e. change: while (ch = getchar() != '\n') to: while ((ch = getchar()) != '\n') Addendum: be sure to take heed of the advice from @TomGoodfellow in a separate answer below - ...


-1

Are you on Java 8? If so, you could do this: Path inPath = Paths.get( "c:/file.txt"); List<String> list = Files.lines(inPath).collect(Collectors.toList()); And process the list. That's preferrable to what you did in your question which has a few bugs like eg you close the in stream in the try block instead of a finally, i. e. on an error it would ...


0

Use the proper scope. limited drive.file scope that only allows it to access files that it created or that the user opened with it. full drive scope that allows the app to manage all user's Drive files. It is strongly recommended to request the limited scope when possible. For more details about all available scopes, check the Google Drive SDK ...


1

If you want to keep the ".0" etc. if and only if it appeared in the input, you need to read the values as text - e.g. into std::strings. When you read into doubles, the logical value is stored (as best as it can be in cases where the exact textual value doesn't have a bitwise representation in a double, such as say 0.1 which can't be represented exactly), ...


0

The only IOException this code is going to throw in practice short of a disk error is FileNotFoundException, whose cause I trust is self-explanatory. The real problem with this code is that you're not printing the exception itself, so you don't get to see what it really is. Don't write code like this. When you get an exception, print the exception, not some ...


0

Remove the DataInputStream (that is for reading primitives, not reading lines), FileInputStream fstream = new FileInputStream(fileName); // DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream(fstream); // BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in)); BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fstream)); Also, I suggest you use ...


0

Multithreaded processing is better than single threaded processing. Robocopy "C:\backup folder" "C:\newBackup" /E /MT:128 Perform Multithreaded File Copies with Robocopy in Windows 7 Windows included the popular Robocopy utility, which offers powerful file copy capabilities in a command line interface. Robocopy is included in Windows 7 and ...


1

I found the problem. The problem was not the code, it works fine (though I feel sure could be improved, I'll take it over to Code Review). The problem was that some of the source files were actually originally Excel documents that became converted to .txt and apparently carried over some meta-data that Notepad ignored, but the VBA compiler did not know what ...


3

Use * in the printf conversion specifier char data[] = "The name is Jack Monroe"; int length = 4; int start = 12; printf("%.*s", length, data + start); // Jack


0

Disregard this. I'll have to take another crack at C# once I swap to Windows 8 since the error seems to be OS & User related with READ/WRITE permissions being all jacked up. With the amount of junk Microsoft installs along side their SDK's and all their other programs all these errors came as no surprise, my programs list is completely full of junk from ...


0

You can use any other local IP address, if you want the server to listen at only that address. More normally, you use null, or omit the parameter, which corresponds to INADDR_ANY, which means to accept connections via any local IP address.


0

If on Android, you can use this: String ext = android.webkit.MimeTypeMap.getSingleton().getFileExtensionFromUrl(file.getName());


2

It looks like if (stackTest = true) { Should be if (stackTest == true) {


6

TL;DR The performance drop is caused by memory allocation, not by file reading issues. A typical benchmarking problem: you benchmark one thing, but actually measure another. First of all, when I rewrote the sample code using RandomAccessFile, FileChannel and ByteBuffer.allocateDirect, the threshold has disappeared. File reading performance became ...


1

The way to do this (with small datasets) is to store the data of one file and merge the data whilst reading the other file like in my code below (you did get a full solution after all :) ) Oh and please note that if you are going to work with huge datasets that you would probably want to use a database instead. And my code will not list users that do not ...


0

You could create a class Student with three fields (UID, name and mark) and then use a HashMap with Integer (UID) as key and Student as value. With that, read the first file and insert in the HashMap instances of Student with name set then read the second file and use the UID to find the corresponding student in the HashMap to set the mark. Finally iterate ...


0

I think you should take a look at the 'RandomAccessFile' Class in tha java.io package. It allows you to specify file pointers that take you to any point in an existing text file for reading or writing, which it seems is what you would like to do. Edit: I see you want to output merged data in a separate file. In that case the accepted answer is sufficient. ...


0

I rewrote the test to test different sizes of buffer. Here is the new code: public class ReadFileInChunks { public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException { String path = "C:\\\\tmp\\1GB.zip"; readFileInChuncks(path, new byte[1024 * 128], false); for (int i = 1; i <= 1024; i+=10) { ...


-1

This can be because of cpu cache, cpu has its own cache memory and there is some fix size for that you can check your cpu cache size by executing this command on cmd wmic cpu get L2CacheSize suppose you have 256k as cpu cache size, So what happens is If you read 256k chunks or smaller, the content that was written to the buffer is still in the CPU ...


1

NFS is, by definition, nonlocal so you're pretty much limited to your network bandwidth - being able to write 10MiB in 700ms is equal to having a bandwidth of 14,28 MiB/s - that'd be about 119Mbit so im guessing you were actually talking about MB/s in which case you still had 114Mbit .... well, i will assume you're on Gigabit-LAN. In that case, you indeed ...


0

This is bug that is already fixed in new version of Karaf


0

To read the last N lines of a files you can use the CPAN module File::ReadBackwards. use File::ReadBackwards; my $lastlines = File::ReadBackwards->new("file.txt"); print reverse map { $lastlines->readline() } (1 .. 2); This will print last 2 lines of a file. Replace 2 with any number what you want.


0

Try this: for (int i = 1; i <= 10 && line != null; i++) { bw.write(line); bw.write("\n-\n"); line = br.readLine(); }


2

Use the function newLine() after you write a line to the Writer: bw.write(line); bw.newLine(); bw.write("-----------"); bw.newLine();


1

Edit again: After getting a wonderful explanation from user eryksun at the bug link below, I now understand why this happens, and it is not a bug per se. When a child process is created on Windows, by default it inherits all open file handles from the parent process. So a possible sequence of events that causes the sharing violation is this (using the ...


1

There are two things to consider when comparing efficiency of these methods - memory efficiency and time efficiency. In terms of memory efficiency, the second method is a clear winner, because it requires a fixed amount of additional memory, while the first method requires an amount proportional to the size of the map being written. In terms of time there ...


0

One solution is to place the bank object inside the do-while loop in main so that a new bank object is created each time. However this presents certain issues, namely the account array and the count variable. You can fix this by placing them in bankUser. static int count = 0; //don't forget to make count global and initialize public static void ...



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