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0

Do something on the lines of - Get the string as it is. Dont split it by space or anything. use the indexOf on the string. Once a match has been found, start from the place int index = word.indexOf(guess); while (index >= 0) { System.out.println(index); index = word.indexOf(guess, index + 1); } Java - Indexes of all occurrences of character ...


1

The usual solution for line oriented input is to read line by line, then parse each line: std::string line; while ( std::getline( in_file, line ) ) { std::istringstream parser( line ); for ( int i = 1; parser >> tmpword && i <= ncol_select; ++ i ) { } if ( parser ) { colsel.push_back( tmpword ); } // No ...


0

Ok, I got it. The last line of the text file does not contain a newline, that's why in_file evaluates to true at the last line. I think I should calculate the number of lines of the file, then replace while(in_file) with a for loop. If someone has a better idea, please post it and I will accept. Update The fix turns out to be rather simple, just check if ...


1

Your problem is that BitArray iterates bytes by least significant bit first because it is an array of bits. See from this example on MSDN the output of myBA3 bit array. You can find more info in the BitArray constructor MSDN article that takes a byte array. Please note the comment in the ctor of the BitArray taking a byte array. You will see that it says: ...


0

Asynchronous means never wait for anyone. So just implement this thing with anyone whether you are getting any value from server or from anywhere just never wait for the response. You can implement this in networking things and NodeJs suits very well for networking kind of stuff.


1

It's basically all kinds of I/O: file, network, child processes (and their input/output streams), etc. So the network I/O would include things like UDP sending/receiving and TCP connections and any protocols layered on top of them such as HTTP requests, SSH connections, SIP connections, etc. In the case of a message queue server, node could query the ...


0

You're going to write exactly (in byte terms) what's in your string. So the backslashes will already be there. The stream won't be escaping them for you. Note also, I would investigate Writers for writing strings, and watch your character encoding! The above is using your default character encoding to determine the bytes to write to your file, and running ...


5

There are several errors in this code: You should remove the dos to simplify func and calc. Technically this is not an error but you should not use unnecessary dos because they just clutter up your code. show has the type Show a => a -> String, whereas calc has the type IO String. Because the types mismatch, your program would not compile. This is ...


0

There are two approach: poll the file in an infinite loop (like in Qianjigui's answer, but it is good to put some sleep inside the infinite loop) use OS event subsystem: kqueue on BSD, inotify on Linux Here is an article I wrote about this: Ruby for Admins: Reading Growing Files. So the program combining both event subsystem and polling looks like this: ...


2

The second one will require ~twice the file's size in memory, otherwise, since it reads the entire file in one call, it will likely read data into memory as fast as the underlying storage can feed it, and then process it as fast as the CPU can do so. It'd be good to avoid the memory cost, and in that respect, your first program is better. On my system, ...


1

The obvious difference is that 2 stops when it reads EOF, while 1 does not. Actually, 2 counts +1 and then stops when it reads EOF. You should do the EOF check before incrementing the counter. If you update 1 to also check for EOF you will probably find the same result. Also it is unclear why you read and discard a character from each file before the start ...


0

by examining if((ch1 ^ ch2) == 0) you are not counting duplication, you can use if(ch1 == ch2) instead


0

This work in GCC 4.9.0 and VS2013. Notes: seekg is for move the read pointer seekp is for move the write pointer In the sample code in line fs.seekp(0, std::ios::beg); need to be seekg. There is no problem because the read pointer has not been move (there is no read until there). Code: #include <algorithm> #include <iostream> #include ...


1

(more verbose answer from what I posted in comments on the question) You need to call flush() on output stream objects (derived from ostream) in order for the data to actually be written on the output stream. More information on flush() is available on this c++ reference page.


0

Here's yet another C++ version that I believe more closely matches the python line-by-line. It attempts to retain the same types of containers and operations found in the python version, with obvious C++ specific tweaks. Note that I lifted the sync_with_stdio optimization from the other answers. #include <iostream> #include <unordered_set> ...


0

I'll bet you have some directory structure in your variable. If there are forward slashes in the path to the filename and the directory doesn't exist, you will get the error you referenced. You can parse the input and check for the existence of the directory and possibly create it if it doesn't exist.


-1

you certainly need to zero terminate str *p++ = 0;


1

In write_int() and write_uint() you increment p but because you have passed char *p, that incrementation is not passed back to the caller. So in the last line of your sample code, p is still equal to str and so you get the empty line. You can modifiy your code in one of these ways: pass a char ** instead of a char * void write_uint(unsigned n, char **p) ...


0

You do not have enough available memory to instanciate an array of zipFile.length() length. Without any major change in the way you read the zip file, you should increase your heap space memory with the JVM options: -XmxX. For instance -Xmx1G (1G standing for 1GB).


0

You are trying to hold in memory byte array with length of 80mb. This is the core of your problem. You should use streams instead, something like this: try (InputStream is = new FileInputStream(zipFile); ZipOutputStream zos = new ZipOutputStream(...)) { (...) IOUtils.copy(is, zos); (...) }


1

I would suggest to save the records in internal storage in private mode,which can be accessed by your app only.If you store it in External storage, there is no guarantee that it will be available next time you load your app. Also, you should save array of record objects rather than ArrayAdapter object. Parcel and Parcelable are fantastically quick, but its ...


0

Case-1 fflush() is used to transfer the data in the intermediate buffer to the file although the buffer is not full(usually data is transmitted after buffer is full). Case-2 After the Output the File Pointer will be in the last position i,e EOF so if you enter input immediately you will not be able to data as the file pointer is at EOF. So you need to set ...


-1

If you have two instances you will have two different machines, there is no way to directly save things in both machines. You can use this : Sharing Role environment storage among high availability instances


0

May be you can use linecache, import linecache linecache.getline(file_path, line_no)


1

1) When you write data into a file, it does not go to the file directly, it goes to a buffer. When it gets filled finally it leaves the file written. All this is to improve performance. One of fflush() uses is for save the data from the buffer into the file regardless if this buffer is half filled. It is like a commit for DBs. For that reason, if you want to ...


0

thanks david_p, scala conf.set("fs.hdfs.impl", classOf[org.apache.hadoop.hdfs.DistributedFileSystem].getName); conf.set("fs.file.impl", classOf[org.apache.hadoop.fs.LocalFileSystem].getName); or <property> <name>fs.hdfs.impl</name> <value>org.apache.hadoop.hdfs.DistributedFileSystem</value> ...


1

For a network share your approach is correct, as you don't have access to the underlying file system for any 'quicker' method. However your code has some issues, the followign shows the basics: string networkPath = @"\\sgb8532fh92\AppData\PCUWEB"; DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(networkPath); long totalSize = 0; foreach (FileInfo fi ...


1

Use the Directory and FileInfo classes. Code example and more information can be found here: static long GetDirectorySize(string p) { // 1. // Get array of all file names. string[] a = Directory.GetFiles(p, "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories); // 2. // Calculate total bytes of all files in a loop. long b = 0; foreach (string name ...


0

If you want to do it in python. Here you are. #!/usr/bin/env python #-*- coding:utf-8 -*- import os import random def test(): filename = 'yourfile' info = os.popen('wc -l filename').readlines() line_number = info[0].split()[0] r = random.randrange(line_number) cmd = 'sed -n "%dp" %s' % (r, filename) info = ...


1

You can try this from the command line - not sure if totally random, but at least is a beginning. $ lines=$(wc -l file | awk '{ print $1 }'); sed -n "$((RANDOM%lines+1))p" file This works like this: First, it sets a variable containing the number of lines in the file. lines=$(wc -l file | awk '{ print $1 }') Later, it prints a random line within ...


2

Your code is not even calling fstat. You're calling stat but passing a FILE pointer to it rather than a pathname. You need to either do: stat(fname1, &buf1); or: fstat(fileno(fp1), &buf1); This mistake should have produced an error (or at least a warning) from the compiler. Also, you should be checking the return value of stat or fstat.


0

There are a few problems with your C++ code. First, you are using mutable strings. Which means you are copying them around a bunch. (Python strings are immutable). Testing for this, I find the effect can actually make the C++ code slower, so lets drop this one. Second, unordered_ containers are probably a good idea. Testing this, I get a 1/3 speedup by ...


1

Making three changes, omitting the extra vector (which you not have in python), reserve memory for the word-vector and avoiding the endl (!) in the output: #include <algorithm> #include <vector> #include <string> #include <iostream> #include <set> #include <map> bool compare_strlen (const std::string &lhs, const ...


2

Test with this, it must be faster than the original C++. Changes are: Eliminated the vector words to save the words (there will be saved already in word_count). Eliminated the set unique_words (in word_count are only the unique words). Eliminated the second copy to words, not needed. Eliminated the sort of the words (the order was updated in the map, now ...


1

std::vector<std::string> words; /* Extract words from the input file, splitting on whitespace */ while (std::cin >> str) { words.push_back(str); } This requires constantly repeating allocate/copy/free operations as the vector grows. Either pre-allocate the vector or use something like a list.


-1

Both std::set and std::map are optimized for lookups, not insertion. They must be sorted/tree-balanced every time you change the contents. You might try using std::unordered_set and std::unordered_map which are hash-based and would be faster for your use case.


1

You have to give the DrStrange namespace to have it work. namespace \normalPpl; use wtf\isWrongHere\DrStrange; class ThisHasNoLogic { public function __constructor(DrStrange $strange){ //here be dragons } } Given you have a good autoload (see psr-4 or php spl_autoload )


0

You are starting a worker thread and a process on the server; the UI render pipe doesn't sit there and wait for them - why would it? (your code just does new Thread(...).Start()). Frankly, you're lucky that you even see "Setting the process" - I would not expect that to keep working in the general case. An http response is disconnected; you won't see updates ...


2

Although the question shows little effort I am reminded how I started out with no knowledge about input or output whatsoever, it is a quite dense forest of information really. Basically to read a file you need to: Open the file Read the file and assign it to a variable Close the file Some functions in MatLab take care of all three steps: importdata ...


2

There are multiple layers of buffering. If you call write, no application layer buffering will occur. If you look at the file from another process you will see the data, but that does not mean they have been committed to disk, because there is a layer of buffering happening in the kernel. Since the kernel is handling the access from the other process, it ...


0

I got it, I need to restore the value of n_skip on every line: #include <iostream> #include <limits> #include <fstream> #include <cstdlib> int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) { std::ifstream in_file("/tmp/testfile"); int n_skip = 2; if(n_skip < 0) { throw "Column number must be >= 1!"; } ...


2

When the outer while loop is executed the first time, n_skip is set to 2. However, when you execute while(n_skip > 0) { in_file >> tmpword; n_skip--; } n_skip gets set to 0 and is never reset to 2. Add a line n_skip = 2; after the line in_file.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n'); to ...


0

You're matching on entirely the wrong thing. You're matching against the physical controller used in the Mac (EHCI, UHCI, OHCI). This will fail whenever they invent a new controller standard, such as XHCI in new Macs since 2012 (for USB 3 compatibility). What you probably want to do is to match against IOUSBDevice, that what I do when I want to match every ...


0

Here's one possible way of reading a file and getting just the "chunks": import java.io.*; import java.util.Scanner; public class ScanXan { public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException { Scanner s = null; try { s = new Scanner(new BufferedReader(new FileReader("xanadu.txt"))); while (s.hasNext()) ...


1

Short answer: You cannot change the limit. You have to read a chunk of data, save it in a buffer, read another chunk, append it to that buffer, and so on until you've received the entire message. Longer answer: The maximum record size is 16384 (2^14) because it's defined that way by the standard. For example, for TLS 1.2, that is rfc5246. The record ...


3

You don't need to write a program to do this, one already exists. cat foo.nc bar.nc > foobar.nc bar.nc will be concatenated onto the end of foo.nc in foobar.nc. This works with binary and textual data. If you want to add to an existing file: cat foo.nc >> bar.nc foo.nc will be added to the end of bar.nc. See man cat for more information.


0

textbeingread = f.readline()[:-1] or textbeingread = f.readline()[:-2] Depends on whether you want to get rid of newline character or also the character before it.


0

textbeingread = f.readline().rstrip("\r\n")


0

To remove only 'medical_data' you need to change this code: while ((currentLine = reader.readLine()) != null) { currentLine = currentLine.replace(delete,""); if (currentLine.equals("")) { } else writer.println(currentLine); } to this code: while ((currentLine = reader.readLine()) != null) { ...


0

While your code is quite ugly it should work. The only problem I can see would be a suboptimal block management. Also you are missing a trim() to cut lines consisting of only whitespaces. Try this instead: while ((currentLine = reader.readLine()) != null) { currentLine = currentLine.replace(delete,"").trim(); if (!currentLine.isEmpty()) ...



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