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0

If you under linux and got large memory(64GB+), try tmpfs, its truly works like mounted disk and you do not need to change your code or buy another SSD.


0

Per default, user_input and user_output are set to the encoding of the platform. If you want to process binary data, you need to change the encoding of user_input and user_output. You can do so by using set_stream/2, like this: :- set_stream(user_input, encoding(octet)). :- set_stream(user_output, encoding(octet)). For streams which you open yourself, you ...


5

You should properly use Java's resource try-catch blocks. This will automatically close the stream even if any exception is thrown: public void fileWriter() throws FileNotFoundException { File file = new File("C:\\Users\\john\\Desktop\\stats.txt"); try (PrintWriter print = new PrintWriter(file)) { print.print(Integer.toString(swordNumber) + ...


2

You didn't close the stream before exiting, and it didn't get flushed and closed properly. Add this line when you're done writing: print.close(); You should always close file handles after using them. Even better, wrap the whole thing in a try-with-resources: try (PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(new File("C:\\Users\\john\\Desktop\\stats.txt"))) { ...


1

Your code will work just fine when you enter any no. without any 0 digit in it .The problem in your code is that you are trying to divide the number by 0. **if (n % (copy % 10) == 0)** In this when we enter any no with 0 as a digit then the value of (copy%10) becomes 0.Thus it tries to divide n by 0 thus throwing an floating point exception error. ...


0

To address the Y part of this problem, yes, you can treat a scalar variable as an input source and use Perl's input processing features. You just open a reference to the variable: open my $fh, '<', \$res; my $header = <$fh>; # first "line" of $res while (my $line = <$fh>) { # next "line" of $res ... }


0

You may use IO::Scalar module. man IO::Scalar : use 5.005; use IO::Scalar; $data = "My message:\n"; ### Open a handle on a string, read it line-by-line, then close it: $SH = new IO::Scalar \$data; while (defined($_ = $SH->getline)) { print "Got line: $_"; } while(<$SH>) works too.


1

If Not fileName.Contains("-") Then 'Get code End If Post your code and I can implement this feature for you.


1

You forgot to close the file. When calling OT.write() the desired file is generated in your filesystem but it has not contents since it is not closed. By calling OT.close() the file is closed and its contents are written to the filesystem as shown by the following console output: # init a file object in python In [7]: f = open('foo.txt', 'w') # write a ...


1

When calling f.read(), the file object will step over all lines and as file objects are generators, it will remember where it stopped reading. If you continue reading with calling f.read() again, the file object will continue reading where it left, i.e. at the end of the file. By calling f.seek(0) you will reset the position in the file and you can read the ...


0

Add f.seek(0) before the second read. Once the file was readed completely, the pointer comes to the file end. Now you have to move the pointer up(ie, file start) . In-order to do this, we have to add fileobject.seek(0)


0

getField is to return the floating point value of the CSV column identified by num. getField is called each time with a new line to parse. Then the function should return a double, namely return(atof(tok)); (and be declared as double getfield(..); You must remove your print statement, as it calls getField but getField modifies the string (through strtok). ...


-1

Have You tried to add the "const" modifier also to char* tmp (so that it's "const char* tmp = strdup(line);")?


0

max_fd must be incremented by 1. The name is indeed confusing, "nfds" is probably more clear. Please have a look here: select man page


2

Your max_fd should be "the highest-numbered file descriptor in any of the three sets, plus 1." according to the select man page. I should rename it so you'll remember to add 1.


3

There is a Flag Enum FileOptions.WriteThrough value that can be passed to the FileStream constructor. It instructs the file stream to directly write to the underlying data storage without any buffering.


2

Best way to work with binary I/O in Haskell is by using bytestrings. Lazy bytestrings provide buffered I/O, so you don't even need to care about it. Code below assumes that chunk size is a multiple of 32-bit (which it is). module Main where import Data.Word import Control.Monad import Data.Binary.Get import Data.Binary.Put import qualified ...


1

Since you have stated in the comments that this file will not be very large I would suggest you read in the header into some sort of container. Then insert after the header the newest data that needs to be inserted into the file. Then read in the rest of the file. After you do that then you can write the contents of the container back into the file. Here ...


2

If you're doing binary I/O, you almost certainly want ByteString for the actual input/output part. Have a look at the hGet and hPut functions it provides. (Or, if you only need strictly linear access, you can try using lazy I/O, but it's easy to get that wrong.) Of course, a byte string is just an array of bytes; your next problem is interpreting those ...


0

Here is a loop to process one line at a time from stdin: import System.IO loop = do b <- hIsEOF stdin if b then return () else do str <- hGetLine stdin let str' = ...process str... hPutStrLn stdout str' Now just replace hGetLine with something that reads 4 bytes, etc. Here is ...


0

You should create HttpEntity with proper ContentType: Post(url, HttpEntity(ContentTypes.`application/json`, message)) This thing explained in docs http://spray.io/documentation/1.2.3/spray-http/#content-type-header


3

That's a good spot. The designers made a few mistakes when defining the Java API, and this inconsistency seems to be one of them. There's no reason why you would want to instantiate a FilterOutputStream directly, so defining the constructor with protected visibility should be preferred. Another question you might ask is why are these classes not abstract. ...


6

In so many lines... getNumbers :: String -> [Int] getNumbers str = -- left as exercise -- helpful functions: `read`, `words` main :: IO () main = do contents <- readFile "numbers.txt" let numbers = getNumbers contents print numbers


1

virtio is a virtualized driver that lives in the KVM Hypervisor. An emulated-IO is for example the virtual Ethernet Controller that you will find in a Virtual Machine. direct I/O is the concept of having a direct I/O operation inside a VM. An example can be a Direct Memory Access to the memory space of a VM. I/O passthrough, or PCI-passthrough, is the ...


0

The |: prompt only appears when stdout is a terminal. It does not appear when stdout is a file. So, it won't cause garbage in the output when your output is redirected to a file. But still, it's not nice. In order to avoid the prompt, clear it using the built-in predicate prompt, like this: prompt(_, ''), which you could insert into your main(Argv) ...


0

I believe that this question might help you: I asked something similar, I hope that this will answer your question


1

You could execute the command that runs the chess program, and then check the command's output for the best move (using a Process). For example: String move = null; Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("go"); BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(process.getOutputStream())); move = reader.readLine(); // 'move' now holds a ...


0

You can look at all the editors which are marked 'dirty' (have modified data) using something like: IWorkbench workbench = PlatformUI.getWorkbench(); IWorkbenchWindow[] windows = workbench.getWorkbenchWindows(); for (IWorkbenchWindow window : windows) { IWorkbenchPage[] pages = window.getPages(); for (IWorkbenchPage page : pages) { ...


0

Just look up the return type of Runtime.exec(). It returns a java.lang.Process. It offers two methods for input and output streaming: getOutputStream() and getInputStream() You can read and write to the opened Process for ex. with BufferedReaders / BufferedWriters. For Example: (see also http://stackoverflow.com/a/14745245/2358582) import java.io.*; ...


0

By default, lvcreate creates a linear LV that does not stripe across PVs; it simply concatenates the PVs together. However, you can configure striping when creating the LV by using the --stripes and --stripesize options. From the man page of lvcreate: -i, --stripes Stripes Gives the number of stripes. This is equal to the number of physical volumes ...


0

I tested the performance: I used scp to copy a big file from other server to the lvm server. And used iostat to monitor. I found only one disk was working at the same time. So the answer is that the LVM does't strip data and the write/read operation is serial not parallel.


0

I'm not sure what the resulting image should look like (do you have an example?), but if you want to unpack an packed image where each pixel has 12 bits into a 16-bit image, you could use this code: import io from PIL import Image rawbytes = ...


0

It's right in the framework -- TextFieldParser. Don't worry about the namespace, it was originally a shim for folks converting from VB6, but it's very useful. Here's a SSCCE that demonstrates its use for a number of different delimiters: class Program { static void Main(string[] args) { var comma = @"one,""two, yo"",three"; var tab ...


0

To answer your question: raf.writeUTF(newContents); is "destroying your file" and causing the "strange characters" to appear. Instead u wanna use raf.writeBytes(newContents); Furthermore I don't know what this code should accomplish but consider that u can't use a RandomAcessFile to insert a string at a specified position. Instead your saveFile() method ...


0

Using SQLite database maybe the best way of saving data for different users. And if you want to edit a text file, you can load the full file in memory and rewrite the file after modify the content.


1

You can only append to a text file (add to the end); any other edit requires that you load the full file in working memory, modify it, and save it a new file (possibly overwriting the old one). If this sounds like a bad idea (because the files are large and complex) then perhaps you should be looking at using SQLLite facilities which are standard android ...


1

Do what six does, and define text_type yourself: try: # Python 2 text_type = unicode except NameError: # Python 3 text_type = str In any case, never use blanked except lines here, you'll be masking other issues entirely unrelated to using a different Python version. It is not clear to me what kind of file object you are writing to ...


1

Since you Have to Remeber Some Points . Where you Home Drive Pointed :System.getProperty("user.home");//Either C or D whatever . or : rootPath = System.getProperty("user.dir")+System.getProperty("file.separator")+"Business"; or String rootPath = ...


1

The answer is no, neither linux nor posix systems have the call you want. I fear that you don't get any advantage of having it, as each of the data streams will follow different paths and that makes copying the buffers in kernel than in user space. Not making copies in user-to-kernel doesn't neccesarily mean doing in kernel mode is better. Either way, in ...


5

Certainly it's possible, just read the first 50 lines and then stop reading. You can't do it without streams, since that's what will happen underneath anyways, but a regular new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(inputStream, "UTF-8"))); (select the proper encoding) will work just fine.


0

First you should explicitly specify the path. Do this using the r specifier and the join command so that it is platform independent. It's best to use the with keyword when operating on files. import os my_path = r'my/longpath/here' # forward slash works on all systems my_list = [i**2 for i in range(1,11)] with open(os.path.join(my_path, 'subdir', ...


0

The text file is created in the pycharm project folder, like you suggested. If you want it to go elsewhere, like your desktop for instance, do this: f = open('path_to_desktop/file.txt', 'w') Note: I just tested this on my own system. I was able to get the project path by right-clicking the folder in the project window(on the right), and clicking 'copy ...


2

Use let a = instead of a <- since the RHS is a pure value. import System.Random main = do g <- newStdGen let a = take 5 (randoms g :: [Double]) print a


4

You can't escape from IO, but inside a do block you're not actually escaping per se. Loosely: when you write g <- newStdGen in a do block, you can then use g later in the block as if it just had type StdGen, instead of IO StdGen. At the end of the block, whatever you return will be wrapped back up in IO.


0

# LOG4J configuration log4j.rootLogger= DEBUG, INFO, Appender1, Appender2 log4j.appender.Appender1=org.apache.log4j.ConsoleAppender log4j.appender.Appender1.layout=org.apache.log4j.PatternLayout log4j.appender.Appender1.layout.ConversionPattern=%-7p %d [%t] %c %x - %m%n log4j.appender.Appender2=org.apache.log4j.FileAppender ...


1

On a large partition, cluster size is often 32 KB. On a large read / write request, if the system sees that there are a series of contiguous clusters, it will combine them into a single I/O. Otherwise, it breaks up the request into multiple I/O's. I don't know what the maximum I/O size is. On some old SCSI controllers, it was 64 KB or 1 MB - 8 KB (17 or 255 ...


2

You usually don't need the best buffer size, which may requires querying the OS for system parameters and do complex estimations or even benchmarking on the target environment, and it's dynamic. Lucky you just need a value that is good enough. I would say a 4K~16K buffer suit most normal usages. Where 4K is the magic number for page size supported by normal ...


0

The first way you show would take care of closing the file even when an error occurs, while the other two would not.


0

Close the outermost output stream or Writer that you've wrapped around the socket output stream. Close the socket/pipe itself in a finally block. Don't bother with the input stream, and don't write a redundant flush() before the close(). Same applies to both ends.


2

Your loop condition is wrong: for(i = 0; i < fileSize; i++) After you have appended content to some lines, the end of the last line is moved beyond filesize and thus will no longer be treated. You test whether the end of the buffer has been reached with i[buffer] == '\0', but that may lead to reading beyond the buffer after having done all shifts and ...



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