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0

Like zmo suggested: outfile.write(u"{}\t{}\n".format(keyword, str(tagSugerido)).encode("utf-8")) should be: outfile.write(u"{}\t{}\n".format(keyword, tagSugerido.encode("utf-8"))) A note on unicode in Python 2 Your software should only work with unicode strings internally, converting to a particular encoding on output. Do prevent from making the same ...


0

As you're not giving a simple concise code to illustrate your question, I'll just give you a general advice on what should be the error: If you're getting a decode error, it's that tagSugerido is read as ASCII and not as Unicode. To fix that, you should do: tagSugerido = unicode(diccionario.get(keyword[0]).decode('utf-8')) to store it as an unicode. ...


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With reference to this answer. You can add below line add the end of systemIO() and cntApp() method i.e. after the System.in.read() method call. System.in.skip(System.in.available()); So your methods will look like this. public void systemIO() throws java.io.IOException { System.out.println("Enter the character"); i = System.in.read(); ...


3

You should refactor your code and separate the part which performs the calculations from the part that takes input from the console. Then you can very easily write the test for the part that performs the calculations, by passing the necessary input as parameters. The part that works with the console is typically very straightforward and does not require ...


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It looks like the keyboard input is buffered and the following code is getting line-terminator/null value that causes the while-loop to terminate. cnt = (char)System.in.read(); Try refactoring the code using Scanner class instead of System.in.read() import java.util.Scanner; public class JavaFile { private Scanner scanner = new ...


0

You could rewrite your cntApp method to use a Scanner and take the first character entered public void cntApp() throws java.io.IOException { Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in); char cnt = 'y'; while (cnt == 'y') { systemIO(); System.out.println("press 'y' if you want continue"); cnt = in.next().charAt(0); ...


1

If you run it in debug : while(cnt =='y'){ systemIO(); System.out.println("press 'y' if you want continue"); cnt = (char)System.in.read(); System.out.println("The Entery value "+cnt); } You'll see that cnt = (char)System.in.read(); return '\r', correspond to the validation by enter. So, i will use a Scanner ...


0

You need to use the physical device when setting up blkio. Use the major:minor for the whole disk (8:0).


1

Here is a code to download files from a web site in Java ... You can adapt this import java.io.BufferedInputStream; import java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream; import java.io.FileOutputStream; import java.io.IOException; import java.io.InputStream; import java.net.URL; public class DownloadFile { public static void ...


1

From man read: On files that support seeking, the read operation commences at the current file offset, and the file offset is incremented by the number of bytes read. If the current file offset is at or past the end of file, no bytes are read, and read() returns zero. So probably you need to execute lseek before second reading, like this: ...


2

When automatic flushing is on, matlab will effectively write to disk after any call to fwrite even if writing very small chunk of data. When disabling automatic flushing, matlab only writes to internal memory buffer and flushes everything to disk only when calling fclose (or when buffer is full). This may improve performances as less access to disk are ...


0

RE-EDIT You can browse a jar file by creating a Jar filesystem and finding its root directory. Then the FileVistor pattern can be used to pick up every file within the jar file. For the other case, the root directory is simply the directory where your files are. Use getResource() to tell you if the class is loaded from a jar file or a directory. The ...


1

You have a few options. You could just call cin.getline(), which will retrieve the remainder of the line including the newlines and leave the pointer at the start of the next line. Works as long as you know the remainder of the input line is ignorable. You can also use cin.ignore(1) or cin.ignore(2) if you know a newline is next. For input streams that ...


0

The answer from @zenith is correct. In addition to that, also look at std::cin.peek(). Here's some code: char s; int T; cin >> T; // pressing ENTER here. while(T--) { while(std::isspace(cin.peek())) // peek used here cin.ignore(); // ignore spaces, tabs and enter


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std::cin.ignore(); to ignore one character. std::cin.ignore(n); to ignore n characters. std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max()); to ignore all characters. Optionally, add a second parameter to define a delimiting character. The default is EOF.


1

csv.writers don't have a write() method. In Python 3 you could do it like this: with open('recipes/' + recipeName + '.csv', 'w', newline='') as csvfile: recipewriter = csv.writer(csvfile) recipewriter.writerow([ingredientList[0]]) recipewriter.writerow([ingredientList[1]]) recipewriter.writerow([ingredientList[2]])


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Simplest way is to just call join on the list adding a , and a newline and forget about using the csv module: with open('recipes/{}.csv'.format(recipeName), 'w') as csvfile: csvfile.write(",\n".join(ingredientList)) Output: flour, 500, g I presume you are actually using writerow not write as csv.writer has no write method. The reason you see ...


0

This error occurs if any file or directory is considered in-use. It is a misleading error. Check to see if you have any explorer windows or command-line windows open to any directory in the tree, or a program that is using a file in that tree.


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private void loadRes() throws IOException{ DataInputStream dis = null; FileOutputStream fos = null; try{ File htmlRes = new File(".", "res"); if(!htmlRes.exists() || !htmlRes.isDirectory()) htmlRes.mkdir(); File outfile = new File(htmlRes, "/res/style.css"); fos = new FileOutputStream(outfile); ...


0

I usually use the directory of the class files and scan them. File directory = MyClass.class.getResource("/."); // or "." dont remember it Now you can use for(File file : directory.listFiles()) { if(file.isDirectory()) scanDirectory(file); else { //check for resources and copy them } } So you can finally walk the directory tree starting ...


2

It doesn't work because you are assuming that your letter for the header is only one character as indicated by: letter = find(ia) + 'A' - 1; What are you doing is essentially building the ASCII code for a capital letter between A to Z. This will obviously fail if you are trying to find a header with more than one letter. What you'll need to do is build ...


0

When reading single bytes from streams, the read() method blocks until data is available. Some streams may fetch data in blocks rather than byte-wise, but the block size completely depends upon the implementation (reading from compressed streams, reading from encrypted streams based on block ciphers, ...). You can ask the stream how many bytes can be read ...


1

when you call inputstream.read(), how does Java break the file down into packets? It doesn't. Files don't have packets. Does java care about whether the file is .mp3, .doc, .txt, .mov ? No. How does the java io actually break all these different file types down into packets which can be streamed? It doesn't. The files are byte-streams, and ...


0

All of your questions are somewhat irrelevant when talking about streaming. The internet works in terms of "packets". These packets have a header to them that contain relevant information (such as destination and protocol type), and appended to that is a bunch of data. There are two main protocols that are used over the internet: TCP and UDP. TCP is meant ...


0

This worked for me import System.IO getNum :: IO Integer getNum = readLn --call function like this something <- getNum --something is type Integer


0

Character.toLowerCase returns the lower case character it does not convert the one you pass in. while ((c = br.read()) != -1) { char character = (char) c; if (Character.isLetter(character)) { if (Character.isUpperCase(character)) { character = Character.toLowerCase(character); System.out.print(character); ...


2

There are several ways to do it. Here is one using a FileChannel: public InputStream getInputStream(final Path path) throws IOException { final ByteBuffer buf = ByteBuffer.allocate(HEADER_SIZE); final FileChannel channel = FileChannel.open(path, StandardOpenOption.READ); channel.read(buf); return Channels.newInputStream(channel); } You ...


0

getClass().getResource() is for packaged files (aka resources). If filePathInputField contains a path to a file in your filesystem, that call will return null. You can access it using an instance of File or Path.


0

This happened to me when I was not correctly closing the Output / Input types. You need to make sure Kryo flushes everything but doing out.close(). Second, look into Kryo.writeObjectAndClass(). You can then do Kryo.readObjectAndClass() and cast your object to the type it is supposed to be.


0

your problem is in for loop. just remove for loop and run your program without any other changes.


2

Just eliminate for loop and you'll be good to go: from string import strip with open(raw_input("give me the file")) as f: lines = sorted(map(strip, f)) with open(r'path', 'w') as a: a.write('\n'.join(lines))


0

The serialization / deserialization methods are for Java object serialization. The simplest way to load a RealMatrix from a file is to use code like this (modified to handle whatever format you are using to represent the source data) to load the file data into a double[][]array and then use the createRealMatrix method in MatrixUtils.


0

As @mbcrute said, I think nginx is a better choice.


3

First of all, your myvector isn't defined or declared anywhere. Secondly, the line you say you have a problem with std::cout << ' ' << (*it)->id;, doesn't exist in your code. However, the problem is most likely the same as what you actually do have in your code. You are looping over a vector containing adjacency_list items, and then trying ...


0

You could initialize a new XYSeries every time a line containing trace is read. This way, the current one is added to a list a series and another series is created for the next one. try { in = new BufferedReader (new FileReader("data.txt")); //read until endLine List<YSeries> seriesList = new ArrayList<>(); YSeries currentSeries ...


0

one way is to use a counter: String line; String XY=""; Integer counter=0; List<String> XYSeries =new ArrayList<String>(); BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file)); while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) { if(counter%2==0){ XY=line; } else { XY=XY+line; } XYSeries.add(XY); ...


4

Binary representation of the "NETWORK" string using: UTF_16BE is: 00 4E 00 45 00 54 00 57 00 4F 00 52 00 4B (Notepad: N E T W O R K) UTF_16LE is: 4E 00 45 00 54 00 57 00 4F 00 52 00 4B 00 (Notepad: NETWORK) The reason for behaviour that you are describing is because Notepad recognizes UTF_16BE representation of the "NETWORK" string as ANSI and UTF_16LE ...


1

Don't use notepad to open the file. It does a terrible job of detecting encoding. Use a better tool in which you can specify the encoding, e.g. NotePad++ or a hex editor.


1

In the loop you read into num instead of num2. So in general num2 is undefined. You also need at the end of each loop's iteration to assign to num the value of num2. Also when you print the number of repetitions you should refer to the old value and not the current one, since you don't know if the current number will be followed by other equal numbers. So ...


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TL;DR. All four of these functions are just typecasts. They are all no-op at run-time. The only difference between them is the type signatures — but it's the type signatures that enforce all the safety guarantees in the first place! The ST monad and the IO monad both give you mutable state. It is famously impossible to escape the IO monad. [Well, ...


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The safe versions must start in the IO monad (because you cannot obtain an ST RealWorld from runST) and allow you to switch between the IO context and a ST RealWorld context. They are safe because ST RealWorld is basically the same thing as IO. The unsafe versions can start anywhere (because runST can be called anywhere) and allow you to switch between an ...


1

Another way could be showing the "Dots" or any character you want .The below code will print progress indicator [sort of loading...]as dots every after 1 sec. PS : I am using sleep here. Think twice if performance is concern. #include<iostream> using namespace std; int main() { int count = 0; cout << "Will load in 10 Sec " ...


0

You can read your file line by line like this. Create your variable indicating whether to read e.g. readEnabled. After you've read the line, check for your tokens: QFile inputFile(fileName); QString outputText, startToken = "#qtread", endToken = "#qtend"; if (inputFile.open(QIODevice::ReadOnly)) { QTextStream in(&inputFile); bool readEnabled = ...


1

You had a second part of the question which hasn't been answered yet. Also, i think that rather than writing dummyBoard to the file i can just initialize the contents with dummyBoard. But i also failed in doing it. And i guess the way should be the same for both. Indeed you can, as follows: contents <- if fileExist then readFile fileName ...


1

The problem is, you are refering internal file object >>> file <type 'file'> >>> file.write([]) Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> TypeError: descriptor 'write' requires a 'file' object but received a 'list' You have to write in your file object which you created in code. a = ...


1

If you want to print the list and then the filename without a newline between the two, you will first have to turn the list into a string, then strip off the brackets from around the list. After that you can grab the filename from the filepath that you have, and put the two together. See code below; def retrive(directory, a_regex): for filename in ...


1

Pure Java solution using Streams, works since Java 8. import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.IOException; import java.io.InputStream; import java.io.InputStreamReader; import java.util.stream.Collectors; // ... public static String inputStreamToString(InputStream is) throws IOException { try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new ...


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There are some problem with your codebase: You are missing the else part of your if expression. In Haskell, since if is an expression , it would need the else part as opposed to other languages where the if-else are statements and the else part is not mandatory. What exactly is dim ? You have to define it. A working program which shows similar in concept ...


0

You can get the location of your resources with ExportUtils.class.getProtectionDomain().getCodeSource().getLocation() If you are running in Eclipse, this should give you a file: URL pointing to the project output folder. If run from a Jar it should point to the Jar. You can then iterate over all files in the resource directory from the file folder or from ...



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