New answers tagged

-1

Building up on @Lightness Races in Orbit's answer, I think it's possible to keep your unsigned char data type if you replace is >> data[i]; with is >> +data[i]; If I am not mistaken this will disable the special-case "interpret and convert ASCII character" algorithm. I know for sure this works when reading an unsigned char, but I admin I never ...


2

unsigned char is special — the standard library is applying its special-case "interpret and convert ASCII character" algorithm, so that reading "2" from the file will result in the unsigned char value 50, not 2. This'll also be the case for any "types" which are actually only aliases of char or unsigned char, such as uint_least8_t (probably). Read ...


1

You still need to handle exception when you assign them to static fields. One way of doing that would be: private final static String ThirdDeviceName; static { try { ThirdDeviceName=iPhone(); } catch (IOException e){ throw new RuntimeException(e); } } But it would be a better approach to handle the exception in the iPhone() method.


1

Short answer: Your method throws an IOException but you don't catch it anywhere. So it's unhandled. You can't use that method for a constant if it throws an exception. Use a try-catch block instead of rethrowing the exception in your method or use a non final attribute that you set inside of a method where you can do the try-catch block.


0

Based on unlimit's post on How to properly split a CSV using C# split() function? : string[] tokens = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Split(paramString, ",");


1

To simply test your code you can use @Sven's answer. To get an idea of a simple io.Reader for testing, consider below example: type R struct { Data string done bool } func (r *R) Read(p []byte) (n int, err error) { copy(p, []byte(r.Data)) if r.done { return 0, io.EOF } r.done = true return len([]byte(r.Data)), nil } R ...


2

You can use bytes.Buffer since it implements the io.Reader functions. Example https://play.golang.org/p/gjjMmT3SzD: package main import ( "bufio" "bytes" "fmt" ) func main() { buf := bytes.NewBufferString("foo\nbar") scanner := bufio.NewScanner(buf) for scanner.Scan() { fmt.Println(scanner.Text()) } }


1

The following code should work: chunksize = 64*1024 #arbitrary number offset = 0 with open(path, 'r+b') as file: while True: file.seek(chunksize*offset) # sets pointer to reading spot chunk = file.read(chunksize) if len(chunk) == 0: # checks if EoF break elif len(chunk) % 16 != 0: # adds bytes to the chunk ...


0

Very simple. You are ignoring the count returned by read. And you should get rid of the pointless null-termination. while ((r = read(fd, buf, BUFF_SIZE)) > 0) { if ((write(STDOUT_FILENO, buf, r)) == -1) { // the fixed line perror(argv[i]); return EXIT_FAILURE; } // if } // while


0

You shoud open these files in binary mode: FILE *inptr = fopen("card.raw", "rb"); ... outptr = fopen(str, "wb"); If card.raw has less than 512 bytes, fread will return 0.


1

One option would be to use ncurses. A minimalistic example: import Control.Monad import UI.NCurses main :: IO () main = runCurses $ do w <- defaultWindow forever $ do e <- getEvent w Nothing updateWindow w $ do moveCursor 0 0 drawString (show e) render


0

This might be the simplest solution, resembling typical code in other programming languages: import System.IO (stdin, hReady) getKey = reverse <$> getKey' "" where getKey' chars = do char <- getChar more <- hReady stdin (if more then getKey' else return) (char:chars) It works by reading more than one character “...


0

If I understand your problem, you have a file marketing.txt that has a single irrelevant value (at least to my understanding) on the first row, followed by 500-rows containing 5-values per row. The challenge is to compute various totals for each group of 20-lines (row and col subtotals for each line and group) and finally row and col totals for the file, ...


0

First, unless there's a trivial error, the .txt write happens after the return function: txt file write is never executed! Then, to suppress output to the console, just do that before running your routine: import sys,os oldstdout = sys.stdout # save to be able to restore it later sys.stdout = os.devnull


3

To answer your specific question: Yes, you can find out the class of System.in by writing code. This is the application you are looking for: public class SystemDotInClassFinder { public static void main(String[] args) { System.out.println(System.in.getClass().getName()); } } Running this script produces: java.io.BufferedInputStream


1

As you can see in the source code it is a BufferedInputStream: private static void initializeSystemClass() { props = new Properties(); initProperties(props); VM.saveAndRemoveProperties(props); lineSeparator = props.getProperty("line.separator"); Version.init(); FileInputStream arg = new FileInputStream(FileDescriptor.in); ...


0

StringBuilder will help you to build the report in memory much more efficiently. But the result is still hold in memory completly. To avoid this you could write partial results (e.g. line by line) using a FileStream.


2

Use a StringBuilder which is more efficient ad adding strings. In c# "+" creates a new string everytime! Use AppendLine, Append, AppendFormat, etc., and when finished ToString(). var report = new StringBuilder(); report.AppendLine("NOT FOUND - Rows"); report.AppendLine("In Current:"); ... Then File.WriteAllText(dir + "\\Report " + newModel.TableName, ...


1

Start by using StringBuilder and see where that gets you. You're copying in a lot of memory with stringx = stringx+ stringy because it creates a new object and copies all of it into the new object. I have a feeling that'll get you where you need to be. Stringbuilder by contrast preallocates memory. Beyond that, you could do things like divide the data ...


0

How to read a line from the console in C? Building your own function, is one of the way that would help you to achieve reading a line from console in C. I'm using dynamic memory allocation to allocate just the sufficient amount of memory required to hold all the characters of a line along with the '\0' character. And here I'm using a loop to scan each ...


0

If you are concerned about using multiple files within the "with" statement, you can open more than one file with a compound statement, or nest the "with" blocks. This is detailed in the answer here: How to open a file using the open with statement As for what happens when the program raises errors, that's what try/except blocks are for. If you know what ...


0

You should wrap your code in solution 2 in a try except finally and always close the file in finally. This way even if there will be errors, your file will close itself. EDIT: as someone else pointed out you can use with to handle that for you.


0

You can use the control code "\n" for a new line. public void savetofile() { StreamWriter SW = new StreamWriter(" path to file "); SW.WriteLine("a"); SW.WriteLine("/n"); SW.WriteLine("b"); SW.WriteLine("/n"); SW.WriteLine("c"); SW.WriteLine("/n"); SW.WriteLine("d"); }


0

Your Problem may be the Length of the file. As asked in another question, the lengt of the file must be correctly supplied. During the decryption, the size may vary from the original file. So be sure to suply the decrypted file size as ContentLength public long ContentLength { //Supply Decrypted file length here.... get { return fileInfo.Length; } } ...


-1

I think that is because C++ are not buffered streams by default. so in first loop you are getting only one line (since it is not buffered), through the iteration you are accessing the hard drive again and again(which will be pretty slow).you may want to look at this question, it might help you.


1

Solution Use Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("login_commands.json") Insteed of Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader().getResource("login_commands.json").getFile() Why ? When you use getResource(), the classloader try to get your file from <JAR_FOLDER>/YOUR_JAR.jar!login_commands.json and this path ...


0

To write using DataOuputStream: DataOutputStream out = new DataOutputStream( new FileOutputStream("file.txt")); out.writeDouble(10.8); out.writeChar('\t'); out.writeInt(5); out.writeChars(" \t ok \n"); out.close(); To read using DataInputStream: DataInputStream in = new DataInputStream( ...


0

You are writing character data and trying to read binary data. It doesn't make sense to use a DataInputStream unless the data was written with a DataOutputStream. In this case you are using a FileWriter so your solution starts with a FileReader, probably with a Scanner wrapped around it.


2

On POSIX systems ios failures set errno so you can get meaningful error messages using that. I often do this: std::string getenv_as_string(std::string const& var) { auto ptr = std::getenv(var.c_str()); return ptr ? ptr : ""; } // ~ doesn't work from C++ const std::string HOME = getenv_as_string("HOME"); int main() { try { std::...


3

According to GCC's C++11 status documentation, "System error support" is fully supported. And according to Bug 57953 - no C++11 compliant std::ios_base::failure found, std::ios_base::failure was changed in Revision 217559 to derive from system_error in C++11. If you look in the updated ios_base.h, std::ios_base::failure derives from system_error if ...


0

LPCWSTR origin = (path + L"\\" + files.at(i)).wstring::c_str(); This line will create a anonymous wstring object, pass the data pointer to 'origin'. After this line, anonymous object will be destructor , and make 'origin' point to the memory that be free already.


4

You have undefined behavior. std::wstring::operator+ is returning a temporary value and origin and destination end up pointing to freed memory. If you'd looked at your program in a debugger you would almost certainly have seen this. Change your code to: wstring path = L"C:\\Users\\oneworduser\\Desktop\\trash"; wstring origin = path + L"\\" + files.at(i); ...


0

One of the places that you are trying to delete the objects is basically the right place to delete them. You want to delete both the list and the elements within the list. It would look something like the following for (int i = 0; i < NUMBEROFENTRIES; ++i) { delete list[i]; } this should go just before your call to delete[] list I'm not sure ...


0

You could write it as a function locally and then send the function to the remote computer. function remoteCommand { #First save string buffer to variable so FromBase64String() parses correctly below $writeString = $using:stringBuffer $writeBuffer = [Convert]::FromBase64String($writeString) $writeStream = [IO.File]::Open($destPath, ...


1

Your (probably everyone's for that matter) web browser is ignoring the tabs. Try this: $file = fopen("file.txt", "r") or die("<br><br>Error."); echo '<pre>' while (!feof($file)) { $string = fgets($file, 4096); echo "\n" . htmlentities($string); } echo '</pre>'; or $file = fopen("file.txt", "r") or die("<br><br>...


1

I fix this problem with adding %%capture as the first line of the cell which contains model.fit()


0

I'm running Eclipse 4.x and jre 1.7, webapp deployed to tomcat7. I have the same problem attempting to delete files from within my spring controller. File f = new File("/home/me/my/file/liveshere/smallfile.txt"); f.delete(); It doesn't work from within the webapp. But... it works in a standalone java app, run from the same IDE. Perhaps Tomcat is ...


2

Im missing the part where you pass the $stringBuffer to your scriptblock. However, first you can write a scriptblock much more easy using curly brackets. Then you could use $using:VARIABLENAME to pass a local script variable: $remoteCommand = { #First save string buffer to variable so FromBase64String() parses correctly below $writeString = $using:...


0

Yet, when I run the ftrace (using the "function" tracer), I never see __generic_file_write_iter() get called. Most probably, __generic_file_write_iter is not listed in /sys/kernel/debug/tracing/available_filter_functions (the functions that ftrace can trace, see ftrace - Function Tracer or Secrets of the Ftrace function tracer).


0

If you are not sure whether the file exists, or whether it is in the same directory as your executable, modify your code to check if the file opened, like this for example: void readFile() { ifstream read("numbersd.txt"); if(!read) { cerr << "File didn't open..Does it exist?" << endl; return; } ... Then, if it didn't open, here are ...


0

You could be doing many things wrong. 1) The file numbers.txt does not exist, and this code fails to check that the file was successfully opened. 2) The file numbers.txt exists, but does not contain ten integer numbers, separated by whitespace, and this code fails to check whether operator>> succeeded, or not. 3) This code also prints ten numbers to ...


0

This can be solved the following way http://www.javaspecialists.eu/archive/Issue153.html Solution obtained from the following question


0

Or simply try to change "\\" to "//", where filepath contains : the here moz//12//14 the/ the code : my_dict={} def reader(): inputfile= open('<filepath>', 'r') for line in inputfile: my_dict[line.strip()]=0 return my_dict print(reader()) the result : {'the/': 0, 'the': 0, 'moz//12//14': 0, 'here': 0} because when you write ...


1

How about this: File file = new File("myfile"); if(file.exists()){ file.delete(); } file.createNewFile(); Or this, which will create a new file OR overwrite existing one: Files.newBufferedWriter(Paths.get("myfile")); Or @CandiedOrange's PrinterWriter: new PrintWriter("myfile").close(); Otherwise, the good old way: File file = new File("myfile")...


0

You are using Maven ? you should probably use ClassLoader, and put the file in /resources


1

I found the difference: By default Runtime.getRuntime().exec will tokenize the input, in the case of ProcessBuilder it will execute the command as it is (i.e: won't tokenize) This is why the Runtime version can work properly, it will separate the command as: ["buildr", "run"] and in the other hand ProcessBuilder will run as: ["buildr run"]. The solution: ...


3

But you use fgets() and then fscanf() here: while(fgets(buff,200,fp)!=NULL) if (strlen(buff) > 10) { fscanf(fp,"%s %s %s %s %s %s %s %s %s",res,atm,atmNum,x,y,z,vx,vy,vz); so you will read one line with fgets() and you will read the next line with fscanf, resulting in skipping the line, as you say. As WhozCraig said, you should use sscanf(), ...


0

Since you are parsing it already it would be most efficient to load the file into a string. Parse it into indexes to the string, you will save memory and can just upload the string whenever you want to. This would be the most effective way, with memory but maybe not processing time. A reply to one of the comments above. Separate processes does not mean ...


2

If you want to not need the return, you need to take the terminal out of canonical mode. If you want it to not echo the response string, you need to disable echoing. You do both of those with tcsetattr. Add to your program: At the top: #include <errno.h> #include <termios.h> At the start of main: struct termios old, modified; if (...



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