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-1

new File("/path/to/file").exists(); will do the trick


2

The MS standard library implementation fully supports multi-threading. The C++ standard explain this requirement: 27.2.3: Concurrent access to a stream object, stream buffer object, or C Library stream by multiple threads may result in a data race unless otherwise specified. If one thread makes a library call a that writes a value to a stream ...


0

fread_no_lock() appears to be used once you make sure that the file is locked with an external mechanism (some form of mutex, probably), and then you use it to reduce overhead: related: What's the intended use of _fread_nolock, _fseek_nolock? This may also answer any further questions you might have: it may or may not be possible for your hard-drive to ...


0

I think you're mixing paradigms. This looks very much like code taken from a bad C-style sample that used a fixed length array of manually allocated polymorphic ioMediaItem classes (that, to add insult to injury, contain and serialize a manual typeswitch mediaInfoType_). Then you're driving a horrendously complicated loop to read items and maintain the ...


0

You probably want to implement some kind of locking mechanism that files are only read when they are completely written, or not at all.


0

The possibility of explicitly catching an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException in FileInputStream is only when you give the input to FileInputStream Constructor in the form of an array value like arg[0]. Because, it is quite possible that in the command line , you might have given only one argument but you are trying to access argv[1] or argv[2].


0

This same code is given as an example in a book for core java. NO IT IS NOT I took the trouble to check this. The original code uses argv[0] for the filename instead of your misspelt string literal, and obviously an array reference can throw that exception. You have misquoted the text you are relying on.


0

Only one device at a time can be serviced on a selector channel. Thus, Maximum Rate = 700 + 700 + 2 * 6.6 + 2 * 1.2 + 5 * 1 = 1420.6 KBytes/sec


0

First, you need to know the endianness of the file. For example, say you have the short 0x1234. In the file is that stored as the byte sequence (0x12, 0x34) or as the sequence (0x34, 0x12)? Depending on the size of your file, the easiest thing to do might be to read all the post-header data into a byte[], then wrap a ByteBuffer around the byte[] (setting ...


0

Replace all instances of ostream in your function with std::ostream. They are different, and the latter is what you need. Optionally, make the second argument of the operator<<() accept a const reference.


3

std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream &out, const Sales_data &cSales_data)


0

Pickle basically only stores the attributes of an object and the classname to recreate it. If you happen to have a C/C++ wrapped object, the attributes might contain pointers to memory locations (aka C-Pointers). So if you pickle that object, destory the old object and restore it, the pointers point somewhere invalid. If those are used during unpickling, ...


1

FileWriter is an old utility class using the default platform encoding (= unportable). It seems you have a single byte encoding, hence the same size. The following PrintWriter fos = new PrintWriter(outFile, "UTF-16LE"); should double the size. BTW the byte versions use the low order byte (& 0xFF).


1

FileOutputStream.write writes only a single byte out. Similarly FileWriter.write writes only a single character out. Even though they both take an int, they do not write out an int. Instead you must use int rn = rd.nextInt( 1000001 ); byte[ ] bytes = new byte[ ] { ( byte ) ( ( rn >>> 0 ) & 0xFF ), ( byte ) ( ( rn >>> 8 ) ...


1

As you refer in the questionFileWriter writes characters while FileOutputStream writes binary files (byte streams). Everything are bits in the computer indeed, but the encodings. FileWriter write characters as human readable encodings, while FileOutputStream writes byte streams. The sizes are the same, because your default encoding should have 32 bits for ...


0

As I understand the behavior: If instead of ctrl-D you type 'ENTER', 4 events are reported as with CTRL-D. We see ascii code:10 for the line feed. With CTRL-D read blocks. CTRL-D isn't signalling EOF but rather flushing out the data so far input. CTRL-D itself being recognized as an event. But actually no data to be pulled out on that fd. And given that ...


0

Answer 1: If you have to deal with track in iPod library, AVAssetReader is the only way.If not, you can choose another decoder like FFmpeg. Answer 2: AVAssetReader supports random access.It has a timeRange property, see http://stackoverflow.com/a/6719873/1060971.


1

The file location was ../names/firstnames.txt from the file, however, the program was being compiled into the .. directory, and therefore, the file should have been named names/firstnames.txt


0

"DAT" is usually used as generic extension for binary data in custom binary formats (other similar extensions are "BIN" and "RAW"). It is not possible to view such binary data as string directly as data usually contains raw binary representation of different types like numbers, collections and sometimes string. What you can do: find reader/parser for ...


1

You don't need to know how hGetLine is implemented to do this: hGetLines :: Handle -> IO [Text] hGetLines h = do line <- hGetLine h if null line then return [] else do lines <- hGetLines h return (line:lines)


2

You must close each PrintWriter, i.e. pw.close() must be on the end of "k" loop.


0

System.out.print("Enter any Value : "); try { int c=Integer.parseInt(new BufferedReader((new InputStreamReader(System.in))).readLine()); System.out.println("Entered Character: " +c); } catch (IOException e) { e.printStackTrace(); } This simple code might help you achieve your requirement.read() will just give you ascii ...


1

consoleOutput.println didn't print anything until it close(). Use System.out.println("Enter any Value : ") instead of consoleOutput.println("Enter any Value : "); Or close consoleOuput if you want to view the text. consoleOutput.print("Enter any Value : "); consoleOutput.close();


0

According to this article, it takes 4 psychical I/O operations whenever an I/O operation is done by an application. These operations are as follows: Read the block that needs modified Read the parity block Update the data block Update the parity block


1

Limiting the values to the range -0x800 to 0x7FF works as suggested by @Carl Norum with x & 0xfff. In theory, printf() also needs to control locale which literally could print out a whole lot more but practically is not a concern. Of course code could use. char buf[4]; buf[0] = 0; snprintf(buf, sizeof buf, "%03x", x & 0xFFF); fputs(buf, stdout); ...


2

You can just truncate before printing: unsigned int x = -11; printf("%03x\n", x & 0xfff); Example output: $ ./example ff5


0

You can use a combination of TextIO.scanStream and Int.scan. This will produce an int option, which contains the next integer in the file if one is available. You can then simply build up a list of all the integers in the file, by calling this function repeatedly until you get a NONE, signifying that there are no more integers.


0

To replace the tabs with nothing: stream = [x.replace('\t','') for x in stream] Or to replace tabs with a single space, and then remove duplicate spaces: stream = [' '.join(x.replace('\t',' ').split()) for x in stream] To remove empty strings (source): stream = filter(None, stream)


0

There docent seem to be a way to assign multiple delimiters or comments using numpys genfromtext. I would recommend looking elsewhere. Try https://docs.python.org/2/library/configparser.html. Here's a link with a quick example so you can get a feel for how to work with the module https://wiki.python.org/moin/ConfigParserExamples


1

The token manager throws an exception because no token can start with the letter "a".


0

It turns out that the problem was elsewhere in the code. I wasn't explicitly closing a file, which led to this issue. Thanks all for your help.


6

Find it on Hackage: https://hackage.haskell.org/package/base-4.6.0.1/docs/System-IO.html#v:hGetLine Click the "source" link: https://hackage.haskell.org/package/base-4.6.0.1/docs/src/GHC-IO-Handle-Text.html#hGetLine Read source: hGetLine h = wantReadableHandle_ "hGetLine" h $ \ handle_ -> do hGetLineBuffered handle_ But if you want to write a ...


0

You are correct, you need to remove jTextField1 from your loop and just print it above the loop and then loop through the dynamic text boxes. // Move jTextField1 to print before your print the dynamic JTextBoxes System.out.println(jTextField1.getText()); for (Component spChild : spChildren) { if (spChild instanceof JTextField) { String ...


1

File f = new File("abc.txt"); OutputStreamWriter out = new OutputStreamWriter(openFileOutput("abc.txt", Context.MODE_WORLD_READABLE)); BufferedWriter bf = new BufferedWriter(out); bf.write("hello world"); bf.close(); System.out.println(f.getAbsolutePath()); I'm only using System.out as an example. You would simply use f.getAbsolutePath() to get the ...


4

Open a new file in the same directory. Write the new value of the variable to the file. If you have some kind of synch operation (sync, fsync, syncfs, whatever) use it. Close the file. Rename the file you just wrote on top of the existing file. While only POSIX guarantees that this will be atomic, every operating system you're likely to use will ...


0

You can also use apache commons io: File file = new File("/home/user/file.txt"); try { List<String> lines = FileUtils.readLines(file); } catch (IOException e) { // TODO Auto-generated catch block e.printStackTrace(); }


1

The problem is PrintStream is created inside the loop that causes the file to be truncated as mentioned in the PrintStream constructor javadoc: Parameters: file - The file to use as the destination of this print stream. If the file exists, then it will be truncated to zero size; otherwise, a new file will be created. The output will be written ...


2

If you are wanting to use the same file for the contacts then you really should only ask for the filename once. Probably in this case, before the while loop. So move the lines before the loop: System.out.print("Type a name for this file, followed by hitting 'enter': "); String fName = kbReader.nextLine(); I then suggest you use a FileWriter and then you ...


1

As I understand it, you load data from files into a Python 2.7 str. In Python 2.7 that is represented solely as bytes, there is no added information what characters those bytes should actually represent. Your XML toolkit refuses to guess, it only accepts ASCII characters, where the mapping is pretty clear (i.e. bytes 0-127). So you have to decode your str ...


1

Instead of writing the file to disk, you can just return it like this: from flask import make_response outdata = "" for data in alldata: outdata += ",".join(data) + "\n" response = make_response(outdata) response.headers["Content-Disposition"] = "attachment; filename=data.csv" return response Alternatively, if you do want to write the file to ...


2

This is not how you should proceed to detect whether a file is binary or not. Here is how you can do to check whether a file is truly text or not; note that this requires that you know the encoding beforehand: final Charset cs = StandardCharsets.UTF_8; // or another final CharsetDecoder decoder = cs.newDecoder() ...


1

I tried out many things but this one is the best approach i found out and used several times.Shows clear thing with example,explained well beautifully in this Post public class MainFragment extends StatedFragment { ... /** * Save Fragment's State here */ @Override protected void onSaveState(Bundle outState) { super.onSaveState(outState); // For ...


1

If you set an unique identifier to your textView, acivity will automatically save state of that element. For other purposes, you should overwrite onSavedInstanceState() method


0

Problem is: You are iterating over the children of jPanel1: jPanel1.getComponents(); And expect there to be a JTextField: if (children[i] instanceof JTextField){ String text = ((JTextField)children[i]).getText(); System.out.println(text); } But since you have added subPanels to jPanel1, the children of jPanel1 are subPanels, not JTextFields! ...


-1

try : StreamReader objInput = new StreamReader(@"F:\\lls\\GSC.DAT", System.Text.Encoding.Default); string output= objInput.ReadToEnd();


5

fwrite buffering and disk caching work on two very different levels. fwrite works on the program level: it buffers numerous small writes and pools them together to make one system call, rather than an individual system call for each small write. This saves you the repeated overhead of switching from user mode to kernel mode and back. Disk caching works on ...


2

read is a single iostream setup (part of every iostream operation) and a single call to the OS, reading directly into the buffer you provided. The iterator works by repeatedly extracting a single char with operator>>. Because of the buffer size, this might mean more OS calls, but more importantly it also means repeated setting up and tearing down of ...


8

Before doing target.read() you want to seek to the start of the file by doing the following: target.seek(0) If you do not seek to the start of the file, the file "cursor" will be at the end of the file and so when you try to read, you will get nothing. This is because when you write, the cursor advances. Useful resource


1

You can try like this: List<string> lst = new List<string>(); DirectoryInfo[] dir = new DirectoryInfo(@"C:\SomePath").GetDirectories("*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories); foreach(DirectoryInfo d in dir) { lst.Add(d.Name); } This will give you the list of all the folders in your directory.



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