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0

maybe this should do what you want : File f = new File(FileUtils.getTempDirectoryPath() + filename);


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As specified in apache doc: It is FileWriter that will create and honor lock files to allow simple cross thread file lock handling. If Writer attributes are unspecified, the default behavior is to overwrite (rather than to append), and to use the value of the system property java.io.tmpdir for the lock file directory Also check source for ...


1

mmap, sendfile, etc If you want crypto in ext4, you should probably look at the google's recent patch to Linux just for that, http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=EXT4-Encryption-Support


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TL;DR: Lazy IO is evil. What happens is that hGetContents returns an IO-lazy list of the file contents. This means that the file handle will be read only when said list is actually accessed. Then the control passes to withFile which closes the file handle. Finally, the result is printed, and the list is demanded: only now a read is performed on the handle. ...


2

Just because your program crashed on a particular line doesn't mean that's where the bug is. Although the cited code fragment is slightly ...odd, technically I see nothing wrong with it. The bug could've occured anywhere else, previously, where memory got corrupted, which eventually results in a crash at this particular point. See ...


2

Since you are talking about processes, not threads, the answer depends on how the underlying OS manages open file handles: On every OS I'm familiar with, Reader will never crash a writer process, as Reader's file handle only allows reading. On Linux, system calls a Reader can potentially invoke on the underlying OS are open(2) with O_RDONLY flag, lseek(2) ...


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Java File IO and plain files were not designed for simultaneous writes and reads. Either your reader will overtake your writer, or your reader will never finish. JB Nizet provided the answer in his comment. You use a BlockingQueue to hold the writer data while you're reading it. Either the queue will empty, or the reader will never finish. You have the ...


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Concern: Your reader thread can read a stale value even when you think another writer thread has updated the variable value Even if you write to a file if synchronization is not there you will see a different value while reading


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The code will not crash. However, the reader will terminate when the end is reached, even if the writer may still be writing. You will have to synchronize somehow!


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readtable(filename,'FileType','text','Delimiter',' ') should work fine. The file extension ".log" is irrelevant as long as your file is delimited with ' '. You can further specify a format string/sequence if you have prior knowledge of column format. Specifying format strings can make the operation a lot quicker. If you don't specify a format then it will ...


0

Don't mess with PYTHONIOENCODING. It's for making Python output a particular encoding ignoring what the console actually supports and is used when using the command shell to redirect Python output to a file in a particular encoding. Windows consoles don't do UTF-8 well. Since you wanted Greek, what is your code page? Code page 737 is a Greek encoding. ...


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i tried your code it is perfectly working for me.i think just try to refresh the project folder where you keep your files and just use single escape sequence for both file path location


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public static void main(String[] args) { BufferedReader br = null; BufferedWriter bw = null; String outFileName = "C:\\Users\\dokania\\Desktop\\New folder\\out.txt"; File file1 = new File("C:\Users\dokania\Desktop\New folder\casp10.txt"); try { String s; int fileCounter = 0; FileWriter fw = new ...


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I guess you used xlsread in order to read data from an XLS file. If you do not add arguments to the function, it will only read the first worksheet. Please check the xlsread documentation by typing doc xlsread in your matlab session. You can see that you can specify the worksheet with the following code : num = xlsread(filename,sheet)


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Example 1: for i = 1, 1000 do io.output("test.txt") io.write("some data to be written\n") io.close() end Example 2: for i = 1, 1000 do local f = io.open("test.txt", "w") f:write("some data to be written\n") f:close() end There is no measurable difference in the execution time. The latter approach is usually preferable because the ...


0

On Windows IoT you have to use Windows.Devices.SerialCommunication namespace to access serial ports. You have to have Windows 10 IoT Extension SDK (installer should be bundled with the Windows 10 image file for you board, you have to register there for downloads to be availble) installed and added as reference to be able to access that namespace. Keep in ...


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To avoid the kernel buffer problem you could use a thread to read the output as in this question. They call it StreamGobbler


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From python: how to convert a string to utf-8, you could convert to unicode and specify the encoding as utf-8 and, failing that, you could tell python to ignore portions of a string that it can't convert to utf-8 with some basic error handling.


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Used Navigate to allow me to Navigate to the next page without using i/o functions, and changed it to also change input so the map would load.


2

Try get an array of Files in directory: File[] array = new File("C:\\Users\\dokania\\Desktop\\Bio\\Casp10\\fasta\\").listFiles(); And then go through all files using foreach cycle for(File file:array){ //... } Maybe you'll need to use FileFilter: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/io/FileFilter.html in method listFiles()


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You could use command line arguments: public class CommandLineTest { public static void main(String[] args) { int howManyFiles = Integer.parseInt(args[0]); } } Above code gives you the first command line argument and treats it as an integer. In your code, you should check if there really is an integer specified, though.


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It's not about Greek or English. It's about encoding in general. If a user submits something encoding comes from the system. Most likely it is neither UTF-8, nor ASCII. Your error is "invalid continuation byte" that indicates ISO-8859-1. Maybe this tread will be helpful? UnicodeDecodeError, invalid continuation byte


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The logic is to create a new FileWriter object in your while loop, everytime you see a '>' symbol. I am using simple int file counter to name multiple output files viz. out0.txt, out1.txt, out2.txt and so on. See below the working code: import java.io.BufferedReader; import java.io.BufferedWriter; import java.io.FileReader; import ...


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Invokes this every time you want to print with a different Writer public class MySaver{ private PrintWriter innerWriter; public MySaver(Writer writer) { this.innerWriter = new PrintWriter(writer); } public void save(String c) throws IOException { innerWriter.write(c); } } Or first create string with StringBuilder ...


1

You need to perform formatted I/O to get the int value representation. fscanf() or better, fgets() is your friend.


1

In your Web Application WEB-INF folder create a folder called files and change the code of FileOutputStream as below. outStream = new FileOutputStream(new File(request.getRealPath("/WEB-INF/")+ "files"+ File.separator + fileName));


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Get the files in a List (from LocalStorage) run a foreach loop (for the List<Files>) let user choose the location once (in phone memory or m/m card) and then simply copy all files in the same location one by one through the foreach loop (because you have the StorageFolder, you can use StorageFile's CopyAsync method) I've done this in my WP store App ...


1

RandomAccess is mostly fast in Java, but can't compare to C. But if you want a better comparison on IO Performance on the JVM read Martin Thompson excellent blog on the subject : http://mechanical-sympathy.blogspot.co.uk/2011/12/java-sequential-io-performance.html


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You can not detect from a C# program if a file has been accessed, there is no message or exposed API that will tell you when it happens. You need to go a lower level in the OS. The normal way of doing this is you set windows itself to do the monitoring via group policy under the Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Advanced Audit Policy ...


6

Your question is based on the false assumption that C code analogous to your Java code would perform as well as IOMeter does. Because this assumption is false, there is no discrepancy between C performance and Java performance to explain. If your question is why your Java code performs so badly relative to IOMeter, the answer is that IOMeter doesn't issue ...


3

From this article and it is dated, legacy java random access is 2.5 to 3.5 times slower. It's a research pdf so don't blame me for your clicking it. Link: http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~guo/projects/736.pdf Java raw I/O is slower than C/C++, since system calls in Java are more expensive; buffering improves Java I/O performance, for it reduces system ...


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Because you're using RandomAccessFile, which is one of the slowest methods of disk I/O in Java. Try using something faster, like a BufferedInputStream or a BufferedOutputStream, and see what speeds you get. If you're wondering why this would make a difference on an SSD (because SSDs are supposed to be good at random access), it's not about the randomness ...


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The standard file type in C is FILE *. Any functions you see using an int fd is an extension and not standard C. Most commonly that would be POSIX extensions. int file descriptors exist because it's what the underlying kernel uses to describe files. On those systems using file descriptors FILE * is a wrapper for a file descriptor, adding buffering etc. But ...


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Are int valued fd and FILE * the same? No. They are not. File descriptor is an int whereas a FILE * is a file pointer. The main difference is that the latter is buffered while the former is not. A file pointer (FILE*) typically contains more information about the stream such as current location, end of file marker, errors on the stream etc. But a file ...


1

You are attempting to create the output stream file in the root directory, /copy.jpg, which is read-only. Use one of the Environment methods, such as getExternalStorageDirectory(), or one of the Context methods such as getFilesDir(), to build a path to a directory you have write access to. For example: File outFile = new ...


0

A simple example using Console.KeyAvailable: Console.WriteLine("Press any key during the next 2 seconds..."); Thread.Sleep(2000); if (Console.KeyAvailable) { Console.WriteLine("Key pressed"); } else { Console.WriteLine("You were too slow"); }


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in.read() is not documented to throw an exception when it reaches EOF. It returns -1. So you will continuously write -1 in an infinite loop. It's behaving as documented. Doc: InputStream.read()


0

What you're seeing are your chars, outside ASCII, being encoded as UTF-8. You have two choices here: either you use [System.Text.Encoding]::GetEncoding("iso-8859-1") to write your file as Latin1 or you use the FileStream.WriteByte() method of the result of io.file.Open to directly write the 0xFE and 0xFC bytes yourself (seems less overkill, but that ...


3

Add a call to stdout().flush() to force the buffer to output before read_line is called: fn main() { print!("Input string: "); std::io::stdout().flush(); let mut string: String = String::new(); std::io::stdin().read_line(&mut string); }


1

You can easily pipe data to a process you've launched through its standard input stream. In the parent process, you can access the child's standard input stream through Process.getOutputStream(). This does require your child process to accept data through standard input rather than a file. Your child process currently gets its input from a file. ...


1

The simplest way to write a collection String to a file is to use a PrintWriter public static void writeToFile(String filename, Iterable<String> strings) { try (PrintWriter pw = new PrintWriter(filename)) { for(String str : strings) pw.println(str); } } If you need to write UTF-8 you can change the encoding with try ...


2

I have a few suggestions to isolate the source of the problem, as there is not yet any indication whether it is occuring from the JVM, OS, or hardware: Your random number generator may be running out of entropy. As a test, use zeroes instead of calling random. Measure the JVM garbage collection times. It is possible that the construction of many temporary ...


3

You are making things too complicated. const QString doStuff(const QString &str) { // Change string however you want } int main(int argc, char *argv[]) { QCoreApplication app(argc, argv); const QString filePath = "/home/user/test.txt"; QTextCodec *codec = QTextCodec::codecForLocale(); // Read file QFile file(filePath); if ...


0

Something to add ... The package unbuffer has support issues with some packages under fedora and redhat unix releases. Setting aside the troubles - Following worked for me - bash myscript.sh 2>&1 | tee /logs/myuser/myproject/myscript_run_20150626_01_06_IST.log Thank you ScDF & matthew your inputs saved me lot of time..


2

os.listdir() returns only file names, to get the full path, use os.path.join(): full_path = os.path.join(input_folder_path, file) for line in open(full_path): fout.write(line) As for your follow-up question about skipping the first line, the simplest way is to use itertools.islice: from itertools import islice for line in islice(open(full_path), ...


0

Both FileStream and StreamWriter are internally buffered (they have a default buffer size of 4096 and 1024 bytes and constructors able to modify it). The complex question would be how to write to a file without using a buffer :-) And note that, thanks to how they work, a StreamWriter that writes to a file will be double-buffered (the buffer of StreamWriter ...


0

As already commented there is a BufferedStream class Adds a buffering layer to read and write operations on another stream. This class cannot be inherited. Example code from MSDN: Server side: // This is a Windows Sockets 2 error code. const int WSAETIMEDOUT = 10060; Socket serverSocket; int bytesReceived, totalReceived = 0; ...


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Use consult/1 to load the facts contained in the file in the prolog KB. Use atom_chars/2 to split an atom to its characters. Use findall/3 to collect multiple solutions to a goal. Example: ?- [loginfo]. ?- findall(log(A,B,C,D), (log(A, B, C, D), sub_atom(D, 0, 1, _, 'F')), Result). Result = [log(name3, surname3, street3, 'France'), log(name4, surname4, ...


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There's a couple of possible reasons that spring to mind: If you use writeback caching in KVM, you will sometimes see better I/O performance in the guest than on the host. This boost is similar to the I/O boost you'd see for installing a battery-backed write cache on a hardware RAID controller. The downside of writeback caching is that you risk disk ...


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Integrate a logging facility like log4j and use this for the output. These loggers can easily be configured through properties files to write to more than one stream. In log4j, these output channels are called Appenders. Writing to files and the console in parallel is basically the standard scenario for these Appenders. You'll want the ...



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