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0

Ended up having to remove android:maxSdkVersion="18" from the manifest file.


1

The type byte in Java is signed, like all primitive types with number semantics (char is the sole exception, but I wouldn't call char number semantics anyway). And Java, like the vast majority of devices, uses two's complement to store values. Therefore the value range of byte is -128 to 127, here's a few of the corresponding 2's complement bit patterns ...


0

You must use the io library. If you want to run your command and pipe it to Lua, like this: exec ip route get 8.8.8.8 | awk 'NR==1 {print $5}' | lua program.lua use something like this: local input = io.read("*all") If you want to call your pipeline from inside Lua, you can do: local input = io.popen("exec ip route get 8.8.8.8 | awk 'NR==1 {print ...


2

I think problem is here do{ scanf("%d",&c[i]); i++; }while(c[i]!=0); Consider current value of i is 0 and you are entering value at c[0] after that increamenting value of i. Now i become 1 and then you are checking c[1] != 0 this is the problem use i=-1; do{ i++; scanf("%d",&c[i]); ...


1

scanf("%d",c[i]) should be scanf("%d",&c[i])


0

It looks like you could be losing the leading zero from your byte string. Here is an example to replace your change function. You shouldn't be modifying global variables from within a method or function (sure, it is an example, but).. #!python from bitstring import BitArray def change(byte): """ create bit array from a hex string that was ...


0

If you're blocked on file I/O, as you suspect, there's probably not much you can do. But parallelizing to different threads might help if you have great bandwidth but terrible latency. Especially if you're dealing with, say, a networked filesystem or a multi-platter logical drive. So, it can't hurt to try. But there's no reason to do it per file type; ...


0

the problem is in the last line. the event change would not fire twice when you pick the same file name. rename the file and see it works.


0

More simply, try (BufferedReader bufferedReader = Files.newBufferedReader(Paths.get(Resources.getResource("path").toURI()))) { //bufferedReader... } try (BufferedWriter bufferedWriter = Files.newBufferedWriter(Paths.get(Resources.getResource("path").toURI()))) { //bufferedWriter... } Note that the path is relative to the ...


3

If the indicator stops after a few seconds, then make sure that the code that stops the indicator runs on the main thread. if it runs on a different thread then use this snippet: dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{ self.activityIndicator.hidden = YES; [self.activityIndicator stopAnimating]; [self.activityIndicator removeFromSuperview]; ...


0

To read 1023 integers of various widths, suggest creating an array indicating the fixed width of each integer. Use that width as an index to the desired format. Use long long to handle digit width up to 19 or so. #define MAX_WIDTH 4 int ReadLine(FILE *inf, const unsigned char *width, long long *data, size_t n) { static const char *format[MAX_WIDTH+1] ...


1

When you redirect to a file, libc will automatically buffer your data. Since you kill your script instead of exiting gracefully, you stop the process before it writes the buffer out. You can use fflush(stdout); to write out (aka flush) the current buffer at any time. You can use setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IONBF, 0); to disable stdout buffering all together.


0

I figured it out! Now that i see it, it is pretty simple f = open('file','r') lines = f.readlines() if lines[5]: del lines[0]


4

change int i = sc.nextInt(); System.out.println(i + " "); to int i = sc.nextInt(); if(i%10 <= 5) { System.out.println(i + " "); } Idea is that i%10 will give the unit digit of a number. So if it is <= 5 print that number.


0

Since the file paradigm is a (resizable) array of bytes, you cannot simply delete data from inside. Instead, you do either of the following: slide back all the data following the fragment to be deleted to overwrite it, then adjust the file's size (old-fashioned, typically used with memory-mapped files or when you can't afford another copy of the data) ...


0

1) Using fgets() right after fscanf(in, "%d", &n) leaves the first line's '\n' in stdin and only read a short line. Suggest avoid mixing fgets() with fscanf(). 2) After using fgets() to read the line (good idea), use sscanf() (or strtol()) to read the numbers, not fscanf() if (fgets(line, MAX_LEN, in) == NULL) Hanlde_EOF(); if (sscanf(line, "%d", ...


0

Code: int main() { int i, j, k; scanf ("%d\n", &i); printf ("%d\n", i); while (i){ --i; scanf ("%d %d\n", &j, &k); printf ("%d %d\n", j, k); } } Execution: ./a.out <input.txt This is using file redirection. Also check about freopen. If u use this, you no need to worry about fscanf syntax. If ...


0

Performance depends on a few factors. I had to create an alternative solution to Mysqldump for a client to make them load a 42GB dump file (with more than 1 billion rows) For reference: originally, MySQLDump took 3.9 days on a 16 core server with 64Gb ram and a 10 disk SSD array. Using uniVocity We loaded the same data in 90 minutes, using a 3 year old ...


0

This condition has many problems : if(bLine.startsWith("Visited") && equals(bLine.startsWith("Link"))) You never initialize bLine. This means that the condition would throws NullPointerException. I'm assuming you want to test the lines you read from the file instead. equals makes no sense in this context - it compares your readFile instance with ...


3

You didn't tell Perl to decode the file. use strict; use warnings; use utf8; # Source code is UTF-8. use open ':std', ':encoding(UTF-8)'; # Terminal and files are UTF-8. my $qfn = ...; open(my $fh, '<', $qfn) or die("Can't open file $qfn: $!\n"); my $text = do { local $/; <$fh> }; print(lc($text));


1

Just tell Perl what encoding the file is in: open FILE, '<:utf8', $filename or die $!; Or, if you want to check the encoding, use open FILE, '<:encoding(UTF-8)', $filename or die $!;


0

This example is not simple, it uses generics which you would not encounter early in java learning (use it at your own risk :) ). package javaformatterexample; import java.util.Formatter; import java.util.List; import java.io.File; import java.io.FileNotFoundException; import java.util.Arrays; public class TextFileFormatter<T> { Formatter ...


2

3>> import binascii 3>> binascii.unhexlify('deadbeef') b'\xde\xad\xbe\xef'


0

if u want to see your stored file. you can see these file into Your device. if You want to initialize the file object then You need to provide the absolute path of the file which is in your device. it is not related with eclipse if u want to know the absolute path. go to file file manager in our device and check those file there. all the file Which You ...


0

you can try fopen(fileLoc, w+) for both reading and writing.


1

fopen(fileLoc, w+) should do it. See http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C_Programming/C_Reference/stdio.h/fopen Update: Also, you might need to call positioning function (like fseek() or fgetpos()) in between the output and input operations, in accordance with the ANSI C standard: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man3/fopen.3.html


0

With the actual pascal implementations you can use the delay procedure, no delay loop necessary. But how long should the delay be? I can think of four ways to get this information. Eventually you can find the documentation of the card or the parts thereon where the necessary delays are listed. You can find an old PC and measure a delay loop with a very ...


0

You need to remove the while and replace it with if: FILE *fp1; int i = 0; fp1 = fopen("d:\hexfile.txt", "r+"); char line[500]; unsigned int hex[40]; while (fgets(line, 8, fp1) != NULL) { if (sscanf(line, "%x", &hex[i]) == 1) { /*here while => if */ printf("%4x \n", hex[i]); i++; } } fclose(fp1);


0

This loop will repeat for ever or until writing to hex[i] breaks something while (sscanf(line, "%x", &hex[i]) == 1) { In answer to OP's second question, here is another way #include <stdio.h> int main() { FILE *fp1; int i = 0, j; unsigned int hex[40]; fp1 = fopen("hexfile.txt", "rt"); while (i<40 && fscanf ...


1

Yes, the with and as keywords are both parts of Python's with-statement. sys.argv[1] is presumably a path to a file. Opening a file with a with-statement ensures that it is automatically closed when control leaves the with-statement's code block. Moreover, the file object returned by open will be accessible through the name infile. In other words, this ...


1

with is used with context managers. In this case the resource being managed is the open infile which must be closed. The file will be closed when the with block is exited even if an exception is thrown inside the block. as is used with with to give a name to the context manager. The as clause is optional. For more information you can read the following ...


1

the module pulse-simple exposes bindings to capture sound from the microphone, see the second example at the top of the page; https://hackage.haskell.org/package/pulse-simple-0.1.13/docs/Sound-Pulse-Simple.html pulse audio libraries required by cabal are obtainable via cygwin (search "pulse" in the cygwin installer). there is a also binding to sox, which ...


0

(Wanted to comment but am not able to.) BufferedImage image = ImageIO.read(filename); Should this be BufferedImage image = ImageIO.read(imageFile); ? I don't even see an override of read that takes a string.


2

You can't stop the creation as part of the with block. When you do with obj as A, obj has to exist before the with block can do anything with it. The call open('a.output', 'w') creates the file before the with can have any say in the matter. You could write your own contextmanager that would auto-delete the file at the end of the with block, but that ...


1

Your wordarray is a array of pointer, not a array of character. You should change char* word[200]; to char word[200]; and *word[i]; to word[i];


-1

The variable "word" as you have declared it is not a char array/cstring, but it is a pointer to a string with a size of 200; this would work but you have not initialized the string with "malloc" hence the "Segmentation Fault" error as you are trying to change a part of memory not allocated to your program. Edit: Also, as a tip, always initialize pointers as ...


0

You declared word as an array of character pointers, assign them characters, and try to dereference those values.


0

If you exchange the FORMAT statements for a format character string, you could do something like SUBROUTINE WRITE_REAL(unit,fmt, x) INTEGER unit CHARACTER(*) fmt REAL x write(unit,fmt) x END WRITEF(NOUT, "(3X,'DAMPING =',F6.2,'%')", DAMPING) but I leave on you whether it is useful. I am somewhat skeptical.


0

Let's see the types of the things you use: *Main> :t lcm lcm :: Integral a => a -> a -> a *Main> let result inp = lcm 3 inp *Main> :t result result :: Integral a => a -> a But you read in a String: *Main> :t getLine getLine :: IO String So, you need to convert a String to something like an integer, and convert an Inegral the ...


4

inp exists only within the scope of the do expression, which explains why you get an error in the first version. As for the second version. it can be rewritten to: main = e where e = do inp <- getLine putStr result result = lcm 3 inp The two where bindings have different scopes, which is why a local binding from one ...


0

You should but you do not have to. Older versions of Java required that you close your InputStream. But in all JAVA versions that Liferay supports, the streams are automatically closed once all there are no more references. However, you are at the mercy of the garbage collector and its schedule.


0

I have just been searching for help to use Winboard Protocol and stumbled onto this thread. After I compiled the code with gcc in cmd prompt (Win8) (4 warnings) I opened Winboard 4.8 start dialog (play against an engine or match 2 engines options). I then loaded my .exe as first chess engine and Winboard paused with "starting first chess program". After a ...


1

To load a text file that's on your classpath. Taken from here for more context. InputStream in = this.getClass().getClassLoader() .getResourceAsStream("SomeTextFile.txt");


0

Use chomp it is portable across operating systems: f.lines.each do |line| wordList << line.chomp.downcase end Or: wordList = f.lines.map {|line| line.chomp.downcase} http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/String.html Your actual problem might be here: count = count + 1`enter code here` The `` cause execution of the command "enter code here" and enter ...


0

In case somebody is wondering, there is a simpler way of reading the file: FileReader.readAsDataURL Check a working example at https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/FileReader.readAsDataURL.


0

First check sd-card is available or not. String state = Environment.getExternalStorageState(); String extStorageDirectory = Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().toString(); if (Environment.MEDIA_MOUNTED.equals(state)) { File folder = folder = new File(extStorageDirectory, "FolderName"); if(!folder.exists()) { folder.mkdir();//making folder } File ...


0

You should be able to call Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory() to get the root path to the SD card and use that to create a FileOutputStream. From there, just use the standard java.io routines. File log = new File(Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory(), "your_file_name.txt"); try { out = new BufferedWriter(new ...


1

Don't use the absolute path String path = "/mnt/extsd/nit.txt"; because you never know about android device being used by users. Rather you can get the external storage directory path by using Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().toString().


1

Its because you are opening the file in binary mode. Try ofstream outFile("new.txt"), this will open the file in text mode and endl should now write numbers in separate line.


1

Don't use std::ofstream::binary for text files. Open as: ofstream outFile("newData.txt", std::ofstream::out); or equivalently just: ofstream outfile("newData.txt");



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