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Are you interested in implementing your own IPC-based shared-memory transport among dockerized applications? OR Are you interested in using a shared-memory transport among dockerized applications? For the latter case this post explains our experience on using Speedus Extreme Performance, an IPC-based shared-memory socket implementation which improves ...


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Check This post explains wich explain how to communicate two dockerized applications using IPC with no need for rebuilding Docker, by using Speedus Plug&Run product. This way any dockerized application will benefit from IPC-level performance even when the application does not have IPC bindings. This is because the Speedus product translates ...


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Quote from Performance: TCP loopback connection vs Unix Domain Socket: When the server and client benchmark programs run on the same box, both the TCP/IP loopback and unix domain sockets can be used. Depending on the platform, unix domain sockets can achieve around 50% more throughput than the TCP/IP loopback (on Linux for instance). The default behavior ...


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If you're passing memory addresses of shared memory (either between threads in a process, or memory that's shared between processes) as the contents of your messages, then you still need memory synchronization to access that memory once you read its address out of the message. But you do not need any additional synchronization to perform operations on the ...


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1 - nothing. It's just much simpler to use bus ( both services and clients are tcp clients, not servers, easier to configure, manage names etc etc) 2 - to make sure that service behind the name is one you trust. Otherwise malicious code might request name and pretend to be that service. 3 - IMO yes ( though not exactly sure ) 4 - name <-> connection. ...


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Your problem is because TCP is a streaming protocol, meaning that data will arrive at your computer in varying chunks and be presented to your application as, and when, a new chunk arrives. QTcpSocket conforms to this specification so you cannot be guaranteed that, when it signals that data has arrived, that the data is complete. Unfortunately, QDataStream ...


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CreatePipe - create named pipes pair by using ZwCreateNamedPipe[CreateNamedPipe] and ZwOpenFile [ CreateFile(OPEN_EXISTING)]. one instance of pair will be live in our process(no not have inherit flag) and second will be duplicated to child process (mast have inherit flag). however we have only one common parameter LPSECURITY_ATTRIBUTES , where we can set ...


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Your problem is caused by 2 unfortunate decisions: Using an event with non-ASCII characters in its name, and calling the ANSI version of the API (indicated by the trailing A). Since the system uses Unicode internally, whenever you call an ANSI API, string parameters are converted to Unicode. The conversion of non-ASCII characters is controlled by the ...


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It might be the EVENT_ALL_ACCESS flag. Do you really need it? Usually "SYNCHRONIZE | EVENT_MODIFY_STATE" is sufficient for events. Try that and let us know.


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The openParentApplication:reply: does have that reply parameter for sending a message back to the WatchKit side. But I think you mean triggering a message from the iPhone app directly. You can look into Darwin notifications for this. It's a C API, but the concepts are similar to NSNotificationCenter where you register to listen for certain notifications, ...


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Assuming Unix-like system, you can use wait or waitpid in the parent to monitor subprocesses synchronously. Alternatively, you can use SIGCHLD to monitor them asynchronously, and call wait or waitpid in the signal handler. You will get notified whenever a subprocesses terminates(including crashing). To re-fork a child with the same parameters when it ...


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We did this using 0mq for the IPC between our CEF process and a non-cef process. We used a simple timer to poll the 0mq message queue for IPC messages to dispatch within CEF and ran CefRunMessageLoop() as normal. This allowed us to have both sending and receiving 0mq sockets without blocking, and we got excellent results for the amount of traffic we were ...


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pthread_cond_broadcast() signals do not get "lost". Every thread which is waiting in a pthread_cond_wait() call at the point where the broadcast is sent will be woken - your problem is almost certainly that every thread is not waiting in the pthread_cond_wait() call at the point where pthead_cond_broadcast() is called - some threads may still be processing ...


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##client.py import socket import sys HOST, PORT = "localhost", 9999 data = " ".join(sys.argv[1:]) sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM) try: sock.connect((HOST, PORT)) sock.sendall(bytes(data +"\n", "utf-8")) received = str(sock.recv(1024), "utf-8") finally: sock.close() print("Sent: {}".format(data)) ...


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The general approach will work. Note the following however: The name argument to shm_open(3) should start with a slash. Pass "/shm_name" instead. (On Linux with glibc, it happens to work without the slash, IIRC.) You need to resize fd with an ftruncate(2), or you'll get a SIGBUS when you try to access the shared memory. Whenever you mmap(2) a file, any ...


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I would use sockets. UDP is probably the best choice here. You could use XML or JSON as data format.


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After a long hardship of 10 hours , I have come up with a solution that runs perfectly without any deadlock of error . Change 1 : In code for writer , first of all open the file in read mode , read the value , then open the file in write mode and then write the incremented value . This is not sufficient , it may further have deadlock problems. Change 2 : ...


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what would be the issue First, your Intent does not match your <service>. Intent i = new Intent(MyService.class.getName()); You are passing in an action String that looks something like mypackage.core.MyService. However, that is not the <action> for your Service: <action android:name="mypackage.IMSBLEService" /> Hence, your ...


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You still need -v /dev:/dev what happens if you do docker run -d -v /dev:/dev --ipc=host dockersharedmemory/shmserver docker run -d -v /dev:/dev --ipc=host dockersharedmemory/shmclient If you dont mount bind /dev/ then the container cannot see whats inside /dev/ which is where your IPC/shm resides isnt it ?


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tl;dr This code is not designed to work under Delphi 7. Visibility specifiers are not allowed in Delphi 7 records. The compiler is objecting to the use of private. You can remove that, but then the next problem will be all the methods that are declared on the record. Again, they are not available in Delphi 7. You might be able to make some headway by ...


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To use Chromium IPC with SendProcessMessage the process must be spawned by CEF itself (which happens for example when a new Renderer is needed). I don't think you can arbitrarily create processes and send messages to them. It's not so difficult to implement you own IPC communication. I can suggest at least two good options: ...


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Are you talking about essentially using ZMQ as the vehicle to store to and retrieve from a shared memory space between two separate processes? If so, then you're digging into details that aren't available to you in ZMQ. Generally speaking, in your situation you would use the "IPC" connection protocol, and ZMQ makes the decision of how to store, send and ...


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You have two bugs. Your first bug is that, as always in C, the array of semaphores created by semget is 0-indexed; so, if you create only one semaphore, the second argument to semctl with that semid should be 0, not 1. The -1 you're getting back from semctl is not the value of the semaphore, but an error indication (you should find that errno == EINVAL). ...


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Actually, the man page for semctl tells you that a return value of -1 means there was an error. To get the error use strerror printf( "%s", strerror(errno) ); Don't forget #include <errno.h> and #include <string.h>


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Turns out AIDL and Binder are not tied to Services. While it is true that a IBinder reference is provided only when binding to a Service, the framework offers the Binder class, which already implements the IBinder interface. Moreover, a Binder instance works transparently across processes and it is not required to live in a Service context. [still ...


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Yeah looks like I got the ordering wrong, but since I don't want to wait forever on a maybe hanging process, I'm reading in the pipes now by threads I start my read_pipes functions before the waiting with timeout, with std::async. Snipett as example: if (!CloseHandle(mddb_importer_stderr_w)) throw std::runtime_error("Can not create mddb_importer ...


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MSMQ is a good way of handling this. If your technology stack permits, I would check out ActiveMQ or RabbitMQ, as you can do true pub/sub broadcasting of your data to other applications that would be interested in receiving those events.


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So using callbacks is certainly one way of doing this. However, the callback channel can timeout and so you'll need a way of automatically reconnecting. If you want to continue down this route then you're looking good understanding-wise. In my opinion, a simpler (and therefore superior) solution is to use netMsmqBinding, host the service in the WPF app, and ...


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You should be able to use a shared refcount. A shared shared pointer or a semaphore to achieve this. For Boost Interprocess, closing does not remove the mapping/shared object. Just do not call remove.


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The reinterpret cast should probably look like this: reinterpret_cast<void*>(&test); You also need to make sure you get the amount of data to transfer right (sizeof is your friend here). Note that sending structs like that can get risky. The objects sent need to be plain old data objects or they will not serialize properly. See What are POD ...


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Your Python code crashes with TypeError: not all arguments converted during string formatting at line print "got: " % l You ought to write print "got: %s" % l You can see the errors that Python outputs by doing: var child = spawn('python', ['-u', 'ipc.py'], { stdio: [ 'pipe', 'pipe', 2 ] }); on Node.js, that is, pipe only standard output but ...


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You can pass in a set number of seconds to wait for the process to exit. Then check if it has exited. If it hasn't, then try and kill the process. In the example below, it waits for 1 minute for the process to exit. If it doesn't exit, then it sensd a command to close the main window and sleep for 2 seconds. If it still hasn't exited then it tries to kill ...


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Please check you have exited the process i.e. you released the file from the memory.


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Your mistake is that with select() you wait for the socket to be readable (which is right) and STDIN to be writable (which is wrong, since the terminal is writable most of the time). You have to wait for both socket or STDIN to be readable, i. e. both file descriptors are to be set in readfds, and NULL can be passed instead of &writefds.


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Of course you can and it doesn't violate any rules. Just just the CoreFoundation libraries. There's no point in me describing it to you if it already has been all written in the official Apple documentation: https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/NetworkingInternet/Conceptual/NetworkingTopics/Articles/UsingSocketsandSocketStreams.html You ...


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To handle this problem you could create the signal handler in the following way to stop and continue a process. void signalHandler(int sig) { if(sig==SIGUSR1) { // issue a wait mutex kill(getpid(), SIGSTOP); } else if(sig==SIGUSR2) { // issue a signal mutex kill(getpid(), SIGCONT); } ...


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Tryout hackbench. Interesting to see the results. Though its benchmarking the scheduler you can change the code to benchmark the IPC instead. Hackbench is both a benchmark and a stress test for the Linux kernel scheduler. It's main job is to create a specified number of pairs of schedulable entities (either threads or traditional processes) which ...


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// I couldn't find library with ashmem_create_region** It's part of the cutils library. You can add it to your Android.mk file like this: LOCAL_LDLIBS := -lcutils


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I can think of a couple of possible explanations: Apparently, if you run a JVM with -XX:UseLargePages enabled, the JVM uses shared memory: see Cannot create JVM with -XX:+UseLargePages enabled If two JVMs open a MemoryMappedByteBuffer on the same file, they are effectively using shared memory: see Java NIO - Memory mapped files It is also possible to write ...


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Yes, this is expected behavior. From the manual page: The shm_unlink() function disassociates the shared memory object specified by name from that name. It's exactly like unlink() on normal files in that regard. If you don't want to do that, just close() the file descriptor. No other cleanup is necessary.



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