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5

It works perfectly fine: >>> import pdb >>> def f(seq): ... pdb.set_trace() ... >>> f([1,2,3]) --Return-- > <stdin>(2)f()->None (Pdb) [x for x in seq] [1, 2, 3] (Pdb) [x in seq for x in seq] [True, True, True] Without showing what you are actually doing nobody can tell you why in your specific case you got a ...


5

Well, you CAN take advantage of the fact that anything in Python is an object. While in the debugger, you can do something like this: def f(): pass ipdb.set_trace = f set_trace will still be called, but it won't do anything. Of course, it's somewhat permanent, but you can just do reload ipdb and you'll get the original behaviour back. (why would you ...


4

Simply call list on the generator. lst = list(gen) lst Be aware, that this affects the generator which will then no longer return any further items. You also cannot use direct call to list as it conflicts with debug command for listing lines of code. Tested on this file: def gen(): yield 1 yield 2 yield 3 yield 4 yield 5 import ipdb ...


4

u is the PDB command to traverse stack frames. You are in the 'uppermost' frame already. help u will tell you more about it: u(p) Move the current frame one level up in the stack trace (to an older frame). The command is closely related to d(own) and w(here): d(own) Move the current frame one level down in the stack trace (to a newer frame). w(here) ...


3

It is a known issue when using ipdb for Windows: https://github.com/gotcha/ipdb/issues/31 Apparently, this ticket is still open. There is a quickfix from a guy that solves the problem: OK ... I commented out line ipdb/main.py:43 which sets io.stdout and sys.stdout. Then I added a "pass" statement. This now seems to work for me on windows.


3

is there any way to have ipython just show the Exception that was caught, rather than showing where in the code it was caught? You could use sys.excepthook: import sys def exc_hook(type, value, traceback): print type sys.excepthook = exc_hook From the sys module documentation: sys.excepthook(type, value, traceback) This function ...


2

You are examining the first iteration, which works fine. The exception occurs later on. Step through the loop some more, because at some point you'll run into a namespace key for which the value has been set to True (not a tuple of a boolean and a list). Why? Because earlier in your code you do: for ns in namespaces.keys(): if ns in open_url.url: ...


1

I'd ensure I've killed the runserver/gunicorn and restarted it cleanly, to ensure there are no threads that are still running ipdb. (if you're using django-devserver, for instance, that's multi-threaded)


1

I use pudb instead. It enables getting to a real ipython shell from the debugger and all the commands there are saved


1

This has frustrated me too for a while. I eventually found the answer here, along with a good detailed explanation. The short answer is, use the ! magic prefix (!sys.exc_info()): In [4]: 1/0 --------------------------------------------------------------------------- ZeroDivisionError Traceback (most recent call last) ... ipdb> ...


1

Use the break command. Don't add any line numbers and it will list all instead of adding them.


1

You can always run Django in single threaded mode python manage.py runserver --nothreading


1

From http://stackoverflow.com/a/12262143/3694 Install package python3-setuptools: run sudo aptitude install python3-setuptools, this will give you the command easy_install3. Install pip using Python 3's setuptools: run sudo easy_install3 pip, this will give you the command pip-3.2. Install your PyPI packages: run sudo pip-3.2 install ...


1

Many command line debuggers behave that way. (pdb, gdb, ipdb ...). If you want display current line again, specify the line number. l 42 If you don't know the current line number, issue where command.



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