Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I don't know specifically what motivation OpenBSD used, but I know of at least one problem that can be a security concern, namely ACLs and specifically black lists. Ponder that you have an incoming connection from 10.1.1.1. This address is blacklisted in your ACL, and thus you refuse the connection. But if you're using a mapped address, it will instead ...


0

var ipAddress = "10.101.5.56"; var longAddress = long.Parse(string.Join("", ipAddress.Split('.').Select(x => x.PadLeft(3, '0')))); Console.WriteLine(longAddress); Output: 10101005056


0

After some search I've found that this line should help you getprop net.dns1 It gets the DNS server and if you haven't set it other than your default gateway, it is the default gateway, and if you haven't set your default gateway other than your router, your default gateway is your router, and unless specified as ipv6, IP usually denotes ipv4. Hope this ...


0

Yes. It can happen here's an example. Problem is, leading zeroes in an IP can sometimes mean that the IP is written in octal.


2

These are tricky. The first note is that you are using change.getText(), which gives the text being added or removed; you want to test the resulting text (i.e. the text after adding or deleting). For this, use change.getControlNewText(). For example, if the current text in the text field is "255.2", and the user types a "5", then change.getText() will ...


0

The next step is to run a dhcp client or send the DHCP message from your application. An easy alternative to see make it work fast is to assign a static IP address but this is not recommended as there could be IP collision.


0

You can manually check the numbers. private static boolean checkIfValidIpv4(String text){ StringTokenizer st = new StringTokenizer(text,"."); for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++){ if(!st.hasMoreTokens()){ return false; } int num = Integer.parseInt(st.nextToken()); if(num < 0 || num > 255){ return false; } } ...


0

Accourding to IPV4to6 I created the following function for you in PHP, gues your looking for this: function ipv4to6($ip=false) { if (!$ip) { return; } $ipAddressBlocks = explode('.', $ip); if (count($ipAddressBlocks) == 0) { return; } $ipv6 = ''; $ipv6Pieces = 0; foreach ($ipAddressBlocks as $ipAddressBlock) { if ($ipv6Pieces%4 == 0 ...


0

As far as I know the main reason is to keep the IPv4 and IPv6 stacks separate. It's the hacks necessary to handle packets coming in on one stack but being handled by the other that cause the security risks.


0

Try using res._u._ext.nsaddrs for IPv6. See https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/src/+/master/net/dns/dns_config_service_posix.cc#437


0

I would recommend the use of IPNetwork Library https://github.com/lduchosal/ipnetwork. As of version 2, it supports IPv4 and IPv6 as well. IPv6 IPNetwork ipnetwork = IPNetwork.Parse("fe80::202:b3ff:fe1e:8329/24"); IPAddress ipaddress = IPAddress.Parse("2001:db8::"); IPAddress ipaddress2 = IPAddress.Parse("fe80::202:b3ff:fe1e:1"); bool contains1 = ...


-1

The storage for the VM needs to be in the same region of the Azure Virtal Network, so you wouldn't be able to assign a VM that exists in one region an address from a VNET that is in another region. You would need to create a new VM in the correct region.


1

Use -VNetName "CloudVNET" on New-AzureVM



Top 50 recent answers are included