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0

Your code should work the way you described. Unfortunately, there's a bug in glibc as described in launchpad bug #673708, which causes it to choose IPv4 first. A work-around on each Linux PC on which you're running your server program: edit /etc/gai.conf, enable all the default rules (uncomment them): label ::1/128 0 label ::/0 1 label ...


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The most appropriate data type for storing an IPv4 address in an MSSQL database, is an int. The only fiddly bit is converting it back to the dotted notation for display/sorting, hence I recommend you create a view that automates this for you.


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Add this parameter to the command line when starting your app: -Djava.net.preferIPv4Stack=true It's purpose is pretty self explanatory.


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Marc B gave me the answer: see that number after the IP? That's the block size. 194.246.104.0|512 is 194.246.104.0 -> 194.246.105.255, which is 512 IPs (edit: I can not type today for some reason)


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I was looking for the answer to this question myself and I could not find one suitable to my needs. I managed to experiment with various answers across the net until I came up with this (works great!). Just thought I would share since this post is the top result via Google. ''''Routine to fetch IPv4 Network addresses for all local network interfaces. ...


1

It's because they are different connections. Each interface, hard wired or wired, will have it's own IP address. The IP itself is assigned by your router. If you are concerned with what pool your IP is assigned from, you need to go into your setup utility and see what is allocated for wireless, and what is wired. This same thing would happen if you had 2 ...


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I'm newbie @ php,sql , but i think fastest way to store something in sql db is to convert it to int value and save as int. I used function in php - function ip_convert() { $ip = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']; $intip = str_replace(".","0",$ip); return $intip; } And then i just replace all dots with zeros. Then if i need use this ip from sql.. if($ip == ...


2

While the other answer is correct as well, a valid IPv6 address may end with decimal rts as well, exactly in order to provide this sort of things. You can just write ::FFFF:129.130.100.11 and you are done.


4

For IPv6, the octets are usually represented as hexadecimal numbers, whereas IPv4 uses decimal. So, an extremely simplified method is to first convert each of the decimal octets (8 bits) to hexadecimal: 129 becomes 81 130 becomes 82 100 becomes 64 11 becomes 0B Then concatenate the results with a colon between the first two and the last two octets: ...


1

IPv4 and IPv6 are separate protocols, so mapping between an IPv4 and IPv6 address is usually not possible. There are however some transitioning mechanisms that put (part of) the IPv4 address inside the IPv6 address. Most IPv6 users won't use these mechanisms though, so usually a mapping will not be possible at all. I'll try to list as many of them here as I ...



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