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1

Isn't PowerShell a bit of overkill? You can use simple NETSH command from command line. To check config: netsh interface ip show config To turn on DHCP: netsh interface ip set address name="Local Area Connection" source=dhcp To setup static address: netsh interface ip set address name="Local Area Connection" source=static addr=192.168.0.100 ...


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classless inter domain routing was invented last century, since then it has not been practical to derive a netmask from a network address, 101.0.0.0 used to be a class A network, I don't know if it still is, neither does ipcalc.


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My C is terribly rusty, and structs with members containing unions (like struct sockaddr_in6) no longer fit in my brain, so in the best cut and paste traditions I adapted chrisaycock's answer to use getnameinfo() instead, with some help from the getifaddrs() man page (which has a better example): #define _GNU_SOURCE # required for NI_NUMERICHOST #include ...


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Late to the party but still relevant. Adding the following parameter to your startup script/run configuration will provide you with ipV4 addresses and not ipV6. -Djava.net.preferIPv4Stack=true


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Here is a script that I use for that. $wmi = Get-WmiObject win32_networkadapterconfiguration -filter "ipenabled = 'true'" if($wmi.count -eq 1) { $wmi.EnableStatic("10.0.0.2", "255.255.255.0") $wmi.SetGateways("10.0.0.1", 1) $wmi.SetDNSServerSearchOrder(@("10.0.0.3","10.0.0.4")) } An an even better option for most situation (especially home ...


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you get an IPv6 address then IPv6 is being used. IPv4 and IPv6 are different protocols, and the client chooses which one to use when both are available. If you want the client's IPv4 address then you can force them to use it by not advertising the IPv6 address in DNS. That would be a bad idea though with the increasing deployment of IPv6. Supporting both is ...


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The reasons for that design decision are complex. IPv6 was based on the Simple Internet Protocol Plus or SIPP. The summary is that SIPP originally had 64 bit addresses but there were already ideas on how to extend the address space in the future if necessary. In the sipp-routing-addr-02 draft the decision was made to simplify the protocol by going to 128 bit ...


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If you match abuses with a mask against a /64 prefix length, i.e. ignoring the host portion of the address, you have a pretty good chance of having thwarted basic attacks from a single host. And if you want to be able to handle attackers with access to even more address space (e.g. a /56 or /48) then there’s no reason why you can’t handle that too.


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Yes you need to be able to handle IPv6 addresses. More and more ISPs are already offering IPv6 connectivity (30% of Belgium is on IPv6, certain mobile providers in the us are > 50% IPv6 etc). That your users will be able to connect over IPv6 is almost a certainty for any website you build today. How to store the addresses is a different question. Some ...



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