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3

In the IPython notebook the best way to do this is often with subplots. You create multiple axes on the same figure and then render the figure in the notebook. For example: import pandas as pd import matplotlib.pyplot as plt %matplotlib inline ys = [[0,1,2,3,4],[4,3,2,1,0]] x_ax = [0,1,2,3,4] fig, axs = plt.subplots(ncols=2, figsize=(10, 4)) for i, y_ax ...


3

Just add the call to plt.show() after you plot the graph (you might want to import matplotlib.pyplot to do that), like this: from pandas import * import matplotlib.pyplot as plt %matplotlib inline ys = [[0,1,2,3,4],[4,3,2,1,0]] x_ax = [0,1,2,3,4] for y_ax in ys: ts = Series(y_ax,index=x_ax) ts.plot(kind='bar', figsize=(15,5)) plt.show()


3

There's an example on on ipython's GitHub issues page that does exactly what you want: import os from subprocess import check_call def post_save(model, os_path, contents_manager): """post-save hook for converting notebooks to .py scripts""" if model['type'] != 'notebook': return # only do this for notebooks d, fname = ...


2

You could lace demo directives into the standalone module, as per the IPython Demo Mode example. Then when actually executing it in the notebook, you make a call to the demo object wrapper each time you want to step to the next important part. So your cells would mostly consist of calls to that demo wrapper object. Option 2 is clearly the best for code ...


2

There's been a little change to the syntax. Nowadays, $ might not be defined by the time your custom.js loads, so instead of something like $([IPython.events]).on("app_initialized.NotebookApp", function () { IPython.load_extensions("whatever"); }); you should do something like require(['base/js/namespace', 'base/js/events'], function(IPython, ...


1

@minrk's answer is the meat and bones of the fix, but you'll need to wrap it in an initialization callback, at least with IPython-3.1.0. In your custom.js: require(['base/js/namespace', 'base/js/events'], function(IPython, events) { events.on('app_initialized.NotebookApp', function() { IPython.CodeCell.options_default.cm_config.autoCloseBrackets = ...


1

One way would be to assign the value to a module-member (something like a global var in module's scope), which persists after you quit the pdb session, since the module is already in sys.modules, and stays there. 1% os.path.exists(3254) ... TypeError: coercing to Unicode: need string or buffer, int found 2% %debug ... ipdb> os.MYVAR = 234 ipdb> q 3% ...


1

I don't think there's a builtin way of suppressing that message since if you look at the %pylab magic function in this file you can see that the print statement is hard coded in there. If this is a one-off kind of thing you can simply comment/remove that print line from your local library. (Typically it would be found at ...


1

You can use Counter together with chain from itertools. Note that I first replace periods with commas before parsing. from collections import Counter import itertools from string import whitespace trimmed_list = [i.replace('.', ',').split(',') for i in sbj[0].tolist() if i != ""] item_list = [item.strip(whitespace) for item in ...


1

Perhaps this is what you are looking for: In [15]: expr = Integral(x,x) In [16]: Eq(expr, expr.doit()) Out[16]: 2 ⌠ x ⎮ x dx = ── ⌡ 2


1

Assuming the area that was transparent is everything surrounding the ax (subplot) you can try this: %matplotlib inline import matplotlib.pyplot as plt fig, ax = plt.subplots(facecolor='w') ax.plot([1,2]) If you want to have white background in figures permanently you need to modify you matplotlibrc file (located in your home folder under .matplotlib\) ...


1

There haven't been any reported issues of charts not displaying in Excel in any version of XlsxWriter that supported charts. There are also almost 300 chart comparison tests in the XlsxWriter codebase that test the charts that it produces byte for byte against files produces by Excel. These are all passing. Also, the output from zipfile in your post ...


1

There is nothing particularly difficult about producing LaTeX equations from Python. Only the the fact that you have to escape things like \ in strings and {} in str.format make it somewhat tedious. You can use a list comprehension, list concatenation and the join method for strings to reduce your example to three lines of code. In [1]: tmp = ...


1

The options --to latex --post PDF have been replaced by --to pdf in IPython >= 3.0. So this should work: ipython nbconvert --to pdf </path/to/notebook> For further information see also issue #7973 on github.


1

I would suggest that you separate your concerns. For your exploratory analysis, write your code in the iPython notebook, but when you've decided that there are some functions that are useful, instead, open up an editor and put your functions into a python file which you can then import. You can use iPython magics to auto reload things you've imported. So ...


1

I was tempted to flag this question as too broad, but perhaps the following will help you. When you decide to wrap some useful code in a function, write some tests. If you think the code is useful, you must have used it with some examples. Write the test first lest you 'forget'. My personal policy for a library module is to run the test in an if __name__ ...


1

pip automatically solves dependancies for you, so simply tell it what you want to install, enter following in your terminal/console. If you are using Windows it will not require sudo sudo pip install ipython[notebook] matplotlib If you have multiple versions of Python installed, it will also come with their own versions of pip.. like pip2, pip3, pip2.6, ...


1

Use interactive instead of interact and update your widget: from IPython.html import widgets from IPython.display import display geo={'USA':['CHI','NYC'],'Russia':['MOW','LED']} def print_city(city): print city def select_city(country): cityW.options = geo[country] scW = widgets.Select(options=geo.keys()) init = scW.value cityW = ...


1

ipywidgets has not been updated for about a year. It seems that you can now do this without any external requirements: %matplotlib inline import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib as mpl # mpl.rcParams['figure.max_open_warning'] = 1 def plot(amplitude, color): fig, ax = plt.subplots(figsize=(4, 3), ...


1

You could download it first via some means (shown below is a %download magic I use) and then use the iframe.


1

When you run any code in the notebook, an execute_request is sent via the notebook server, to a 'kernel', a process which executes your code. When the kernel receives your code, it runs it through a sequence of input transformers. One of these detects that this line is a magic command, and rewrites it to: get_ipython().magic('load_ext sql') You can see ...


1

I think you may need to reshape the data frame: %matplotlib inline from io import StringIO import pandas as pd import matplotlib as mpl mpl.rc("figure", figsize=(8,6)) data = """ country,2010,2011,2012 Afghanistan,1,2,3 Belize,5,3,2 England,3,3,4 """ df = pd.read_csv(StringIO(data)) reshaped_df = pd.melt(df, id_vars=["country"], var_name="year") df = ...



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