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4

Some setup: %matplotlib notebook import matplotlib.pyplot as plt from IPython.html.widgets import interactive from IPython.display import display import numpy as np Create your objects: fig, ax = plt.subplots() ax.set_xlim(0, .25) ax.set_ylim(-2.5, 2.5) ax.set_title('beat frequencies') lnA, = ax.plot([], [], color='r', label='A') lnB, = ax.plot([], [], ...


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Yes, you can not use the same terminal. Solutions: open another terminal or run ipython notebook inside screen. If you use Windows you might want to take a look into this question Notebook documents (ipynb files) can be converted to a range of static formats including LaTeX, HTML, PDF and Python. Read more about converting notebooks in manual Notebooks are ...


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This is simply one of the features of ipython. It exists to make it possible to call functions without using the parenthesis. Starting your line with / tells it to treat the first word as a function name, add parenthesis to it, and treat any following words or symbols as arguments. So, for example / str 42 Becomes interpreted as: str(42) You can find ...


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Could it be you have to install from the Jupyter repo now as things were moving around since the release of jupyter? Next releases will not be only for ipython but also for other kernels like julia and bash etc. From https://github.com/jupyter/jupyter_notebook Create a virtual env (ie jupyter-dev) ensure that you have node/npm installed (ie brew install ...


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Your problem (as spotted by @ J Richard Snape) is that your dates are in fact strings so it's ordered lexicographically. You should convert to datetime dtype: df1['Ship_date'] = pd.to_datetime(df1['Ship_date']) After which it should maintain the expected order.


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Given that you are new to Python I would advise that you install a distribution that already includes the complete scientific python stack such as WinPython or Anaconda. If it is specifically sympy you are after you can play around online at Sympy live. If you want to stick to your distribution try installing sympy with pip install sympy rather than ...


2

I had the same problem, and I solved it by creating a new file called ipython_config.py in the same folder as manage.py with the following content: c = get_config() # Notebook server config below # Kernel config c.IPKernelApp.pylab = 'inline' # if you want plotting support always # Notebook config: ip address and port ...


2

In the IPython notebook, only the result of the last line of a cell is shown, unless it is explicitly printed or displayed. Some options: Put the second df.head() in the next cell Use print df to explicitly print the dataframe -> but, this gives the text representation instead of html representation Use display(df) to explicitly display the dataframe, ...


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ipython is now called Jupyter so perhaps a different version of Anaconda is installed on the other computer? So Jupyter is what ipython will continue to develop as - they dropped python as it is basically "agnostic": it can load different languages - python 2 or 3, but also R , Julia and more. helpful video on Jupyter intro ...


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You should be able to do this using the pygments_magic extension. It uses pygmentize which supports fortran syntax highlighting. If you want to execute Fortran code you could use fortran-magic


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As @Jakob answered in the comments, the easiest way to accompish this is to install the python-markdown IPython notebook extension, as described on the wiki page. You can then access your variables in markdown by surrounding them with curly brackets: Python cell: x = 1000 Markdown cell: Insert variable contents here -> {{x}}. The markdown cell ...


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by default value_counts does not count NaN values, you can change this by doing df['Embarked'].value_counts(dropna=False) . I looked at your value_counts for Gender column (577 + 314 = 891) versus Embarked column (644 + 168 + 77 = 889) and they are different by 2 which means you must have 2 NaN values. So you either drop them first (using dropna) or fill ...


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SVG are vectors images (the drawings are saved as commands to draw lines, circles, etc). PNGs are bitmaps. So to convert SVG to PNG, you need a renderer. The most obvious solution is ImageMagick, a library you have already installed, as it is used in several programs. A less obvious approach is using Inkscape. Using the commandline options, it's possible to ...


1

You need to display the SVG like from IPython.display import SVG, display def show_svg(): display(SVG(url='http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg')) You first example works as the SVG object returns itself an is subsequently displayed by the IPython display machinery. As you want to create your SVG object in a ...


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It is because you're doing it in the Notebook in separate cells. You should group your plotting commands pertaining to the same figure into a single cell. As your code currently stands, the Notebook thinks you're referring to a new figure. Unrelated tip: you might consider suffixing your plot-related commands with a ;, which indicates returned-value ...


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The ipython notebook formats data for you if you just return values from a cell in the way you do. To see the actual value, you have to explicitly print it, look here: df = pd.DataFrame(data=[["""aa\n<br> bb"""], ['bb']], columns=["col"]) print df.ix[0].col aa <br> bb So nothing is actually wrong, it's just the ipython representation that ...


1

A better solution for your problem might be the Charts library. It enables you to use the excellent Highcharts javascript library to make beautiful and interactive plots. Highcharts uses the HTML svg tag so all your charts are actually vector images. Some features: Vector plots which you can download in .png, .jpg and .svg formats so you will never run ...


1

Disclaimer, I work for Plotly. I just created an issue for it on our GitHub page: https://github.com/plotly/python-api/issues/218 For now, I was able to from IPython.display import IFrame and display the plot in a new cell with IFrame(src=your_url, width=your_width, height=your_height). Does that work for you for now? I'll drop a gist in the comments ...


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Long story short, you'll have to either call R's print method explicitly or customize rpy2's conversion rules for ipython (not shown here). %%R library(ggvis) library(dplyr) p <- ChickWeight %>% ggvis(~Time, ~weight) %>% layer_points() print(p) Note that the figure obtained is in a different page than your ipython notebook, which breaks a bit ...


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I found a solution from the post on this group. Solution I did: I had the most release of R (R 3.2.0) and following the discussion in the above link, I installed R 3.1.3 and copied winCairo.dll from C:\Program Files\R\R-3.1.3\library\grDevices\libs\x64 to C:\Anaconda\R\library\grDevices\libs\x64. Copying winCairo.dll from R 3.2.0 does not work for my ...


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To get IPython looking into a custom directory for its profiles, the IPYTHONDIR environment variable can be used. On Win7 I use a start stript which sets the variable before starting the notebook to quickly switch between different profiles and IPython versions like set IPYTHONDIR=PATH/TO/DIR/.ipython ipython notebook The same should work on unix-like ...


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A KernelManager deals with starting and stopping a single kernel, and there's a MultiKernelManager to co-ordinate more than one. http://ipython.org/ipython-doc/3/api/generated/IPython.kernel.manager.html http://ipython.org/ipython-doc/3/api/generated/IPython.kernel.multikernelmanager.html Then you can use the .client() method to get a KernelClient ...


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Almost automatically: %load startup.py Put import/config code in a version controlled file on your PYTHONPATH and %load it into the first cell. This has the advantage of allowing you to use different startup code without tweaking your startup config, and notebooks remain portable, i.e. send the notebook and startup file to other users and they can run it ...


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Checking the CSS of the notebook I get: font-family: "Helvetica Neue",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; Thats what you want I guesss? Example see: http://www.cssfontstack.com/helvetica


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You can access environmental variables instead.


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Combining the answers by @John_C and @cknd and avoiding the `-key (which is a dead-key on my (Dutch) keyboard layout), I added this to my ~/.ipython/profile_name/static/custom/custom.js: $([IPython.events]).on('notebook_loaded.Notebook', function(){ $('#header').hide(); IPython.keyboard_manager.command_shortcuts.add_shortcut('ctrl-;', function ...


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Here is my solution(ish). It is crude, but should serve as a starting point for building websocket proxy. The full code is available in unreleased project, pyramid_notebook. This uses ws4py and uWSGI instead of gunicorn We use uWSGI's internal mechanism to receive downstream websocket message loop. There is nothing like WSGI for websockets in Python world ...


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You need to have Python 2 installed on your machine. When you type: python2 on the command line Python 2 has to a start.



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