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41

IPython notebook uses MathJax to render LaTeX inside html/markdown. Just put your LaTeX math inside $$. $$c = \sqrt{a^2 + b^2}$$ Or you can display LaTeX / Math output from Python, as seen towards the end of the notebook tour: from IPython.display import display, Math, Latex display(Math(r'F(k) = \int_{-\infty}^{\infty} f(x) e^{2\pi i k} dx'))


29

I believe the following work in version 0.11 and above. To check the version: $ ipython --version It may be worth adding this information to your question. Solution: You need to find the file ipython_notebook_config.py. Depending on your installation process this should be in somewhere like .config/ipython/profile_default/ipython_notebook_config.py ...


24

According to the documentation, you should be able to switch back and forth like this: In [2]: %pylab inline In [3]: plot(...) In [4]: %pylab qt # wx, gtk, osx or tk In [5]: plot(...) and that will pop up a regular plot window. I hope this helps.


22

For version 0.11.0 you need to change both display.heigth and display.max_rows. pd.set_option('display.height', 500) pd.set_option('display.max_rows', 500) See also pd.describe_option('display')


21

I accepted the other answer since it was technically a software firewall that was preventing this but thought I would provide more data in an answer that may be useful to others the return output to the notebook was being blocked by Sophos Endpoint Security and Control Disabling "Sophos Web Intelligence Service" in services.msc worked but was not ideal ...


18

This came up in a search I was just doing, found a better solution with some more searching, IPython notebooks now have a %%latex magic that makes the whole cell Latex without the $$ wrapper for each line. Refer notebook tour for Rich Display System


18

Oh, the shortcut is now shift+tab.


17

It has been a while since this question was asked, but I have just discovered the solution for it here -- maybe you have too. For reference, I summarize the solution. I added these lines to my .bash_profile: export LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8 export LANG=en_US.UTF-8 I reloaded the profile: source ~/.bash_profile I then ran ipython again: ipython notebook ...


17

Yes, you can specify the notebooks location in your profile configuration. Since it's not saving them to the directory where you started the notebook, I assume that you have this option set in your profile. You can find out the the path to the profiles directory by using: $ ipython locate Either in your default profile or in the profile you use, edit the ...


15

Summary of the chat discussion: CPU affinity is a mechanism for pinning a process to a particular CPU core, and the issue here is that sometimes importing numpy can end up pinning Python processes to CPU 0, as a result of linking against particular BLAS libraries. You can unpin all of your engines by running this cell: %%px import os import psutil from ...


12

Similarly to Jakob's answer, you can use HTML tags. Just a note that the color attribute of font (<font color=...>) is deprecated in HTML5. The following syntax would be HTML5-compliant: This <span style="color:red">word</span> is not black. Same caution that Jakob made probably still applies: Be aware that this will not survive a ...


11

This is a matplotlib question, and you can get around this by using a backend that doesn't display to the user, e.g. 'Agg': import matplotlib matplotlib.use('Agg') import matplotlib.pyplot as plt plt.plot([1,2,3]) plt.savefig('/tmp/test.png') EDIT: If you don't want to lose the ability to display plots, turn off Interactive Mode, and only call plt.show() ...


11

The problem you (and others) face is that PDFs cannot be displayed directly in the browser. The only possible way to get something similar is to use an image-converter to create a PNG or JPG out of the PDF and display this one. This could be done via imagemagick and a custom display function. Update: A simple solution is to use wand ...


11

You can simply use raw html tags like foo <font color='red'>bar</font> foo Be aware that this will not survive a conversion of the notebook to latex.


10

The right way is described in: http://blog.fperez.org/2012/09/blogging-with-ipython-notebook.html. Then you can do nbconvert -f blogger-html your_notebook.ipynb to get the html code for your post.


10

You can use ix like you were, but applying a different slice... df2 = df1.ix[3:] will give you a new df without the first three rows.


10

I am in the same situation as the OP and just found out that the IPython notebook works (without disablying Sophos) when it is started with ipython notebook --ip=localhost


10

We are very close to releasing a stable Bokeh 0.2, but you can check out the repo now and look at a number of interactive examples including maps with embedded pie charts, candlestick plots, grid plots of color scatter points, streamlines and vector plots, etc. These can all be created from Python either inside an IPython notebook, or you can run a Python ...


9

One step further from the answer above. If you want to create a PDF file. create a tex file nbconvert -f latex your_notebook.ipynb convert tex to pdf : pdflatex your_notebook.tex


9

In this case, where the DataFrame is long but not too wide, you can simply slice it: >>> df = pd.DataFrame({"A": range(1000), "B": range(1000)}) >>> df <class 'pandas.core.frame.DataFrame'> Int64Index: 1000 entries, 0 to 999 Data columns: A 1000 non-null values B 1000 non-null values dtypes: int64(2) >>> df[:5] A ...


9

Make the multiple axes first and pass them to the Pandas plot function, like: fig, axs = plt.subplots(1,2) df['korisnika'].plot(ax=axs[0]) df['osiguranika'].plot(ax=axs[1]) It still gives you 1 figure, but with two different plots next to each other.


9

If you just want to make a histogram of the numbers in your vector 'a', there are a couple of problems. First, ggplot accepts data in the form of a pandas Dataframe, so you need to build that first. import pandas as pd a = [1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 4, 5, 6] df = pd.DataFrame(a, columns=['a']) Second, the geom is geom_histogram() not geom_hist(). And finally, it ...


9

You are asking how to import .py files into the individual cells This can be done with the magic command %load. If you execute a cell containing: %load filename.py the content of filename.py will be loaded in the next cell. This will work with any text file, not only .py. To see the help of the magic command type %load?. For list of all the magic ...


8

you cannot directly convert an ipynb into a pdf, so the error message is right! You need to first convert it into latex: nbconvert.py -f latex your_nb.ipynb and then use pdflatex your_nb.tex to build the pdf file. Hope it helps.


8

Found a solution here: http://mail.scipy.org/pipermail/ipython-user/2012-April/009838.html Quoting the solution here for ref: Brian Granger: " Have the function return the raw HTML wrapped in an HTML object: from IPython.core.display import HTML ... ... def foo(): raw_html = "<h1>Yah, rendered HTML</h1>" return HTML(raw_html) " Now ...


8

I write a method to show the four corners of the data and monkey-patch to dataframe to do so: def _sw(df, up_rows=10, down_rows=5, left_cols=4, right_cols=3, return_df=False): ''' display df data at four corners A,B (up_pt) C,D (down_pt) parameters : up_rows=10, down_rows=5, left_cols=4, right_cols=3 usage: df ...


8

You can change the default figure format in the ipython profile configuration files. What I did was create a configuration profile especially for the notebook server, using: ipython profile create nbserver At the command line. This creates a whole bunch of files under ~/.ipython/profile_nbserver which have example lines for almost every setting you could ...


8

Try: import IPython print IPython.sys_info() Does it report that you are on 1.0+ ? You might be picking up an older version of IPython that do not have the %matplotlib magic.


8

I had the same problem. Try from sympy.interactive import printing printing.init_printing(use_latex=True) instead of %load_ext sympyprinting I am using sympy 0.7.2


8

Not sure it would be an exact equivalent of iPython's notebooks, but you can use knitr to make literacy programming in R, by inserting code chunks inside a document. If you use a format like RMarkdown, you can export the document and the result of the code chunks to HTML. You can then publish the HTML file somewhere, or use sites like Rpubs. This process is ...



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