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3

You need to reload the module after modifying it: import importlib importlib.reload(foo) In general, this works better with the import foo form of the import statement, rather than from foo import some_func. If you have a long module name, you can rename it with import some_long_module as slm


3

I got the same problem when upgrading ipython. This is a bug linked to the latest 4 version, I recommend you switch back to the stable version 3.2.1: pip uninstall -y ipython pip install ipython==3.2.1 note: the -y option indicates "yes I want to uninstall" with no interaction note 2: possible duplicate in ipython server can't launch: No module named ...


3

Try use ColumnDataSouce. Hover tool needs to have access to the data source so that it can display info. @x, @y are the x-y values in data unit. (@ prefix is special, can only followed by a limited set of variable, @y2 is not one of them)., Normally I would use $+ column_name to display the value of my interest, such as $weight. See here for more info. ...


2

You can write to the console by directly writing to file descriptor 1 (instead of sys.stdout, which is mapped to the iPython notebook): import os os.write(1, "text\n")


2

There's no need to loop through individual rows to do these types of tests. Operations like +, -, == etc. on pandas columns are vectorised, i.e. they are automatically applied to each element of the column. Your test should just look like: data['alwaysRenewed'] = (data['Year_Season'] == '2014-2015') & (data['Rank_output'] > 1) This will create a ...


2

To answer your question, YES, if you only have one node available, especially one as powerful as you describe (as long as it can handle the size of the data) it does make sense. I would recommend running your application in "local" mode, since you are only using 1 node. When you run ./spark-submit, specify: --master local[*] as in: ./spark-submit ...


2

I would use hide_input_all from nbextensions (https://github.com/ipython-contrib/IPython-notebook-extensions). Here's how: Find out where your IPython directory is: from IPython.utils.path import get_ipython_dir print get_ipython_dir() Download nbextensions and move it to the IPython directory. Edit your custom.js file somewhere in the IPython directory ...


2

You can put the following in ~/.ipython/profile_default/ipython_config.py file. It automatically executes when you start notebook in command line ipython notebook. Some options I find useful: # Configuration file for ipython. c = get_config() c.InteractiveShellApp.exec_lines = [ 'from __future__ import print_function, division', '%matplotlib ...


2

who only prints the results, it doesn't return anything you can access (you'd need to intercept the stream). But you can us who_ls instead, which is what who calls: In [23]: df0 = pd.DataFrame() In [24]: df1 = pd.DataFrame() In [25]: w = %who DataFrame df0 df1 In [26]: w In [27]: w = %who_ls DataFrame In [28]: w Out[28]: ['df0', 'df1'] In [29]: ...


1

Found a nice workaround for this, using the 'slides' option of nbconvert: In your iPython notebook under "Cell Toolbar" select "Slideshow" Then in the top right of the cells that you don't want to show select Slide Type "skip" Now run python nbconvert your_notebook.ipynb --to slides Instead of serving the slide, just open the resulting html in a browser. ...


1

I am using EC2 but encounter same problem. I uses SSL told in the tutorial, after login and open a notebook in Safari always showing "Connecting to kernel". Then I try Chrome, which gives warning about certificate but works fine. Then I comment the certificate in config file, then open in Safari it works fine. If you are using Firefox, may be this issue ...


1

You could set the y-limits explicitly plt.ylim(min(reso_values), max(reso_values)+1) before each call to plt.savefig. To use sharey, you'd need to create a single figure containing two (or more) axes: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import matplotlib as mpl import string np.random.seed(2015) N = 130 reso_values = ...


1

Make sure that the name sorted is not overwritten. >>> sorted([5,4,3,2,1]) [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] >>> sorted = [] # <--- overwritten; shadows builtin `sorted` function. >>> sorted([5,4,3,2,1]) Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> TypeError: 'list' object is not callable


1

what's a good strategy to solve this? Subdomains I cannot use subdomains for each Ipython server (as they are dynamically added) Not true. # this will only py<some-digits> subdomain. server { listen 80; server_name ~^(?<sub>py\d+)\.example\.com$; # now you have $sub variable that contains subdomain # and could be used ...


1

If you are using the anaconda distribution, this worked for me (on a macintosh): $ conda create -n py3k python=3 anaconda $ source activate py3k $ ipython kernelspec install-self


1

One solution is adding pyspark-shell to the shell environment variable PYSPARK_SUBMIT_ARGS: export PYSPARK_SUBMIT_ARGS="--master local[2] pyspark-shell" There is a change in python/pyspark/java_gateway.py , which requires PYSPARK_SUBMIT_ARGS includes pyspark-shell if a PYSPARK_SUBMIT_ARGS variable is set by a user.


1

IPython has a specific extension "autoreload" that reloads modules automatically before entering the execution of code typed at the IPython prompt. It is already included in the standard IPython installation, so in your example, you only need to write: %load_ext autoreload %autoreload 2 import foo And then each time you call a specific function of foo, ...


1

You could start jupyter as usual, and add the following to the top of your code: import sys sys.path.insert(0, '<path>/spark/python/') sys.path.insert(0, '<path>/spark/python/lib/py4j-0.8.2.1-src.zip') import pyspark conf = pyspark.SparkConf().set<conf settings> sc = pyspark.SparkContext(conf=conf) and change the parts in angled brackets ...


1

Its as the error suggests - ValueError: too many values to unpack . There are too many values on the right side, but not enough names/variables on the left side to accept them all. In your case , your argv has 5 elements , but you are trying to store them in 4 elements. I am guessing this is something related to ipython-notebook. You should invoke your ...


1

Further to @Kyle Kelley and @DGrady, here is the entry which can be found in the $HOME/.ipython/profile_default/ipython_kernel_config.py (or whichever profile you have created) Change # Configure matplotlib for interactive use with the default matplotlib backend. # c.IPKernelApp.matplotlib = none to # Configure matplotlib for interactive use with the ...


1

You can add the jar files in the spark-defaults.conf file (located in the conf folder of your spark installation). If there is more than one entry in the jars list, use : as separator. spark.driver.extraClassPath /path/to/my.jar This property is documented in https://spark.apache.org/docs/1.3.1/configuration.html#runtime-environment


1

For 4.0 and above You need to install the notebook app separately from https://github.com/jupyter/notebook


1

I wrote some code that accomplishes this, and adds a button to toggle visibility of code. The following goes in a code cell at the top of a notebook: from IPython.display import display from IPython.display import HTML import IPython.core.display as di # Example: di.display_html('<h3>%s:</h3>' % str, raw=True) # This line will hide code by ...


1

This is just building on the answer that @Abhay Bhadani already provided for himself, since I can't seem to find the root cause myself You may try to edit your ipython profile. In my case I had to create a profile with the following command: ipython profile create then append the following line to the ipython notebook config. In my case that file is ...


1

This post proposes CTRL-Z as a workaround for sending the process to background and then killing the process by its process id: Cannot kill Python script with Ctrl-C Possible problems: The program catches ctrl-c and does nothing, very unlikely. There are background processes that are not managed correctly. Only the main process receives the signal and ...


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The quickstart method blocks the thread on which gets called. Basically it calls cherrypy.engine.block. But you can also directly mount your application and call the methods on the engine. >>> cherrypy.tree.mount(RootApp(), '') >>> # you can do some config with cherrypy.config or on the mount third argument. >>> ...


1

As far as I understand the Python .py file export is one direction process as it loses information in the process. If you wish to repopen the notebooks for edit use the native JSON (ipynb) format. For now your option is to reconstruct the cells from the source code by hand.


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Are you using Firefox? This was a reported issue with some older versions of FF: https://github.com/bokeh/bokeh/issues/1981 https://github.com/bokeh/bokeh/issues/2122 Upgrading FF resolved the issue.



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