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The extension methods provided for IQueryable<T> and IEnumerable<T> are generally respectively found in the types Queryable and Enumerable. Keep in mind that the former are interfaces. Interfaces can't have implementations defined. These are extension methods (with implementation) which means they need to be defined in a static class as static ...


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I have used this pattern called query object pattern which I believe is similar to what you are trying to achieve here. The pattern does not automatically record the queries and replays them for you but it lets you write queries in a way that they can be replayed and also avoids the side-effects of a pattern like repository. We would being with defining an ...


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Is there any other way to do this beside adding .ToList()? I guess enabling MARS in your connection string may be an alternative to ToList(). If I use .ToList() as a solution, will this cause a performance problem when it goes to production? It depends on the number of distinct UserNames in your DataBase Because AFAIK ToList() will try to ...


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I think I understand your question, but LINQ2SQL (or any LINQ for that matter) will only evaluate when needed, not directly on the statement / assignment. It's called deferred execution! So in your example, you're just building a (giant) query, and with a ToList() or a foreach, it will evaluate all that you stacked together, generate a big SQL statement ...


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You can use generics for this. You will also need to use the DbSet<T> property of your context. Something like this should do: public virtual DataSourceResult populate<T>([DataSourceRequest]DataSourceRequest request) { using (var dbEntities = new dbEntities()) { IQueryable<T> entityResult = dbEntities.DbSet<T>(); ...


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Here is a method that will let you compose expressions; that is to say you can use the output of one expression as the input of another, creating a new expression taking the input that the first takes and the output that the second takes: public static Expression<Func<TFirstParam, TResult>> Compose<TFirstParam, TIntermediate, TResult>( ...


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Here is how you can do it : public static IQueryable<TSource> Search<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, string>> getValueExpression, string searchOption, string searchValue) { // const searchValue var searchValueExpression = Expression.Constant(searchValue); // parameter x var ...


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You have a required association, but the expected objects are not present in the database. But let's first see what EF does. In the first count... var wrongCount = query.Count(); ...the Includes are ignored. There's no reason to execute them because EF has been told that the referred objects (EntityRelated1 and EntityRelated2 are mandatory, so inner ...


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Include is not a LINQ method proper, is an EntityFramework extension designed to do eager loading and not much else. Includes are lost if the query shape changes: When you call the Include method, the query path is only valid on the returned instance of the IQueryable of T. Other instances of IQueryable of T and the context itself are not affected. ...


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You can use ServicePredicateBuilder to serialize expressions. http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/851187/ServicePredicateBuilder-for-creating-Serializable


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This is why I believe that having Repository classes - for the database access layer - is always a good idea. So you never have to access your dbContext object directly, but through a layer of abstraction, eg. the StudentRepositoy. IStudentRepository studentRepository = new StudentRepository(dbContext); var students = studentRepository.getStudents(); In ...


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Have you considered creating a view in the database that accounts for the IsRemoved flag? Select * From <tablename> Where IsRemoved = 0 Then add the view to your DBContext. Just an idea.


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The code you've posted looks to be the appropriate way to implement IQueryable. res = res.Where(...) basically tacks on additional where clause information until the query is executed at res.ToList();. calling res.Where doesn't actually make changes to the res query. You're likely just limiting your where clause too much and eliminating all records from ...


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IQueryable objects don't actually contain data until you either do a ToList(). Until then they're just queries. So what you've done in you assignment is replaced the query with ... I don't know what. What you should do is something like this: IQueryable Results = res.Where(i => i.Status == InvoiceStatus.Paid); //(or whatever) return ...



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