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2

This doesn't work because puts only calls to_s on things which are not already strings. In your case 'hello' is already a string, so puts doesn't need to call to_s on it (puts also contains explicit implementations for some other classes, such as arrays) If on the other hand you had defined a to_s method on something that is not already a String then your ...


0

I was having the same issue, somehow the JSON gem was either not avaialble or remvoed. I installed the json gem again, now ruby & irb will run now. sudo gem install json


3

You need to add require "card" to deck.rb, since you reference Card in .build_cards. You will also need to add lib to your load path, since it is no longer done for you in Ruby. You can do this on the command-line: irb -Ilib ruby -Ilib Note that rspec does this for you automatically, which is why your specs work. If needed (say if you had a script in bin ...


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Thanks for sharing your class, the issue is that Peep is expecting a Time object but you're sending it a formatted string. It be better practice to do this: class Peep include DataMapper::Resource property :peep_timestamp, Time def format_time self.peep_timestamp.strftime("%I:%M%p") end end now you can still instantiate the class with: ...


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You're not using the time_stamp method, you're directly calling #peep_timestamp. You can do something like the following to display it as you want. <%= time_stamp(peep.peep_timestamp) %>


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I think it is to do with the property :peep_timestamp, Time. As (rather unintuitively) Time includes a date. I think you need to create a method within Peep that changes what is saved for this property so that it doesn't make reference to the date.


2

In Rails, you can conditionally mix methods into the console when the Rails app is started via IRB. This is done using the console configuration block in your application.rb file. module MyApp class Application < Rails::Application # ... console do # define the methods here end end end In your case, there are several ...


2

Using ruby 1.9.3 on Ubuntu 14.04, I am able to load files from the current directory into irb with the following command line: irb -I . -r foo.rb where foo.rb is the file I want to load from my current directory. The -I option is necessary to add the current directory (.) to ruby's load path, as explained in the ruby man page. This makes it possible to ...


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As infused said, irb comes with your using ruby, and in irb, with 'RUBY_VERSION', you can check the using ruby version When I'm using 2.0 #rvm use ruby-2.0.0-p576 Using /home/yi/.rvm/gems/ruby-2.0.0-p576 #irb 2.0.0-p576 :001 > RUBY_VERSION => "2.0.0" 2.0.0-p576 :002 > when switch to 1.9.3 #rvm use ruby-1.9.3-p448 Using ...


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The simplest way is to use bundler as follows: $ bundle exec rails c or you shell to fix your PATH variable prepending it with proper version of rails: $ bundle show rails /path/to/rails/in/bundle/environment $ export PATH=/path/to/rails/in/bundle/environment:$PATH $ rails c



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