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You can load a fixture in the Rails 3.2 console as follows: require 'active_record/fixtures' ActiveRecord::Fixtures.create_fixtures FIXTURE_PATH_HERE, MODEL_NAME_HERE


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The > prompt means there is no uncompleted expression, i.e., a new expression is expected. The * prompt means it is in the middle of an uncompleted expression.


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It's possible to specify an alternate fixture directory using the FIXTURES_DIR variable. The value should be relative to test/fixtures. $ rake db:fixtures:load RAILS_ENV=test FIXTURES_DIR='../../spec/fixtures' It's also possible to specify a limited set of fixtures $ rake db:fixtures:load RAILS_ENV=test FIXTURES_DIR='../../spec/fixtures' ...


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Use rails console by typing: rails c or rails console


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No. You can't access local variables from a different scope. That's the whole point of local variables: they are local to the scope they are defined in. In this case, a is local to the script body of script.rb.


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Your code is really complicated and obfuscated. First, let's clean up your code a bit so that we can see more clearly what's going on. You don't need self, since it is the default receiver anyway. And you don't need send, because you already know the name of the method you want to call. Also, Kernel#local_variables uses the current Binding anyway. Also, ...


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Philip Hallstrom gives you a code that you can use to solve your problem, but does not answer your question. The real answer to your question is: Yes.


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You could pass the binding into the method. class Object def list_vars(b) a = 1 # This is only here to demonstrate. It's not necessary for it to work. b.local_variables.each do |var| puts "#{var} = " + b.local_variable_get(var).inspect end end end x = 1 list_vars(binding) def foo z = 1 list_vars(binding) end foo Will output: ...


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Make the method as this and try: def copy(new_period) @copy = self.dup @copy.report_id = Report.maximum(:report_id).next @copy.period_id = new_period @copy.save end Because to get a copy, use the clone (or dup for rails 3.1) method: # rails < 3.1 new_record = old_record.clone #rails >= 3.1 new_record = old_record.dup So what is happening ...


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You're updating the old model because the id of the model is still set. You can see that because your console shows an UPDATE instead of an INSERT statement. From the Docs for ActiveRecord::Core#clone: Identical to Ruby's clone method. This is a “shallow” copy. Be warned that your attributes are not copied. That means that modifying attributes of the ...



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