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7

Coq has extensive libraries covering real analysis. Various developments come to mind: the standard library and projects building on it such as the now defunct coqtail project [1] (with extensive coverage of power series and quite a bit of work on Complex numbers) or the more recent coquelicot. All of these rely on an axiomatic definition of the reals ...


7

Isabelle/HOL does not have subtypes in the sense of substitutability. This means that if you need a value of type a, then you have to provide a value of type a - you cannot get along with a different type b. In particular, Isabelle does not have the notion of subtype where the values of the subtype satisfy some additional property. There are some ways to ...


5

In this case the proof becomes more readable by stating the assumption of each case explicitly: proof cases assume "n = 0" show ?thesis sorry next assume "n ≠ 0" show ?thesis sorry qed


4

Soundness of natural deduction requires that you get hold of the witness before you open the existential quantifier. This is why you are not allowed to use obtained variables in show statements. In your example, the proof step implicitly applies the rule exI. This turns the existentially quantified variable x into the schematic variable ?x, which can be ...


4

There is the rule ccontr for classical proofs by contradiction: have "<expression>" proof (rule ccontr) assume "¬ <expression>" then show False sorry qed It may sometimes help to use by contradiction to prove the last step. There is also the rule classical (which looks less intuitive): have "<expression>" proof (rule classical) ...


4

If the False case is shorter, just put it first. The order of proofs in an Isar block does not matter: proof (cases "n = 0") case False show ?thesis sorry next case True show ?thesis sorry qed


4

The simplifier trace can be enabled by specifying attributes simp_trace or simp_trace_new: lemma "⟦xs @ zs = ys @ xs; [] @ xs = [] @ [] ⟧ ⟹ ys = zs" using [[simp_trace]] apply simp done If the cursor is positioned after the simp step, the output pane shows the rewrite trace inline (with the list what rules are added, what are applied and what terms ...


4

presume does not make the Isar language more expressive, because you can restructure every proof with presume into one with assume only. Nevertheless, there are at least two (more or less common) use cases: First, presume sometimes leads to more natural proofs, because you can use presume like a cut. For example, suppose that you your proof state has two ...


3

You can give the witness (i.e. the element you want to put in for x) in the show clause: lemma "∃ x. x * (t :: nat) = t" proof show "1*t = t" by simp qed


3

While writing the question, I had an idea, and it turns out to be what I want: from `a ∨ b ∨ c` have foo proof(elim disjE) assume a show foo sorry next assume b show foo sorry next assume c show foo sorry qed


3

In principle meta-implication ==> is nothing to be avoided (in fact its the "native" way to express inference rules in Isabelle). There is a canonical way that often allows us to avoid meta-implication when writing Isar proofs. E.g., for a general goal "!!x. A ==> B" we can write in Isar fix x assume "A" ... show "B" For your specific example, ...


3

Another canonical way to do this kind of case analysis is as follows: { assume a have foo sorry } moreover { assume b have foo sorry } moreover { assume c have foo sorry } ultimately have foo using `a ∨ b ∨ c` by blast That is, let an automatic tool "figure out" the details at the end. This works especially well when considering arithmetical cases ...


2

My experience is that such low-level (and ad-hoc) rules like your disj_not and redgreen are hardly ever useful. If they are really necessary this can most likely be attributed to some lack of automation (via appropriate simp, intro, elim, and dest rules). Gladly, in your example these "intermediate lemmas" are not necessary at all (and I do not think that ...


2

You can continue in "apply" style within a structured proof by using apply_end instead of apply, but this is rarely seen in practice and only during explorative work. In a polished proof, you would just pick the subgoals that merit an Isar proof and finish off all the remaining subgoals in one method call after the qed, as there is no need to deal with the ...


2

Isar allows many variations on the same theme. Keeping the original outline, you can make intermediate facts explicit like this: proof (cases "n = 0") case True (* lots of stuff here *) from `n = 0` show ?thesis sorry next case False (* lots of stuff here too *) from `n ≠ 0` show ?thesis sorry qed This is a conservative extension of the ...


2

Type casts require explicit functions between the types, say, consts cast_A :: "type1 ⇒ type3" consts cast_B :: "type2 ⇒ type3" Using these functions, you can state your axiom as follows: axiomatization where c0: "cast_A ` A ∪ cast_B ` B = {}" Isabelle can also automatically insert such coercion functions, but you have to enable it first: declare ...


2

If you are happy downloading a file or two, the l4.verified project includes a tool called Apply Trace written by Daniel Matichuk. It gives you a new command apply_trace that can be used wherever you would ordinarily use apply, but will show you the theorems used in the step. For example, writing: lemma "⟦xs @ zs = ys @ xs; [] @ xs = [] @ [] ⟧ ⟹ ys = zs" ...


2

It mostly depends on whether you are using the archaic (sorry for that ;)) apply-style or proper structured Isar for proving. I will give a small example to cover both styles. Assume you wanted to prove lemma "A & B" Where A and B just serve as placeholders for potentially huge formulas. As structured proof you would do something like: proof show ...


2

Sets in Isabelle/HOL are always typed, i.e., they contain only elements of one type. If you want to have untyped sets, you have to switch to another logic such as Isabelle/ZF. Similarly, all values in HOL are annotated with their type, and this is fundamental to the logic. Equality, for example, can only be applied to two values of the same type. Hence, ...


2

The method default internally calls the methods rule, unfold_locales and intro_classes. None of these support case names (for unfold_locales, this has been discussed already on the Isabelle mailing list in 2008). So there is no way to get the case_name system to work with default. That thread mentions two important points: If your locale hierarchy is flat, ...


2

When writing structured proofs, it is best to avoid meta-implication (and quantification) for the outermost structure of the subgoal. I.e. instead of talking about ⋀x. P x ⟹ Q x ⟹ R x you should use fix x assume "P x" "Q x" ... show "R x" If P x and Q x have some structure, it is fine to use meta-implication and -quantification for these. There is a ...


1

The construct definition serves as a way to abstract away implementation details. One of its use is to prove some properties of the associated term and then rely on the properties instead of the term declaration itself. Therefore the simplification rules for the defined terms are not added automatically to the simpset. The rules are still available with the ...


1

Sledgehammer has found a correct proof (though you may want to use simp instead). In fact you can continue with the second and third subgoals (that will be reduced to similar new subgoals as you have for #1 after you prove them) and to finally finish the proof with qed. The issue is how Isabelle handles assumptions. If, as in you case, they are not listed ...


1

Theory playground imports Main that defines a lot. If you want to start from the bare grounds, you shall use Pure instead. Another issue is with ("_play" 5) that should read ("_" 5) (it defines a syntax). After these two changes you can proceed.


1

The error is not weird at all. Just have a look at the term that is represented by ?thesis (via term "?thesis") "λd k l. 0 < d ⟶ ¬ 2 * k + 1 ≤ 2 * l ⟶ 2 * l ≠ 1 ⟶ - (2 * l) < 2 * k - 1 ⟶ k ≤ l ⟶ d * (2 * k - 2) + d * (2 * l) + d = d * (4 * k - 1)" :: "int ⇒ int ⇒ int ⇒ bool" You can see that the ⋀-bound variables have been ...


1

A few notes on the original question: Outer syntax is the theory and proof language of Isar; to change it you define additional commands. You are subject to general types of theory content, like theory, local_theory, Proof.context, but these types are very flexible and can assimilate arbitrary ML data that is specific to your application. Inner syntax is ...


1

There is the sum-type, written 'a + 'b, in Isabelle/HOL that allows you to combine elements of two different types into a new one. The two constructors of the sum type are Inl :: 'a => 'a + 'b for inject left and Inr :: 'b => 'a + 'b for inject right. Using the sum-type you could for example combine lists of numbers nat list with plain numbers ...



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