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45

ARM calls FIQ the fast interrupt, with the implication that IRQ is normal priority. In any real system, there will be many more sources of interrupts than just two devices and there will therefore be some external hardware interrupt controller which allows masking, prioritization etc. of these multiple sources and which drives the interrupt request lines to ...


31

A feature of modern ARM CPUs (and some others). From the patent: A method of performing a fast interrupt in a digital data processor having the capability of handling more than one interrupt is provided. When a fast interrupt request is received a flag is set and the program counter and condition code registers are stored on a stack. At ...


16

Interrupts can be viewed as a mean of communication between the CPU and the OS kernel. Signals can be viewed as a mean of communication between the OS kernel and OS processes. Interrupts may be initiated by the CPU (exceptions - e.g.: divide by zero, page fault), devices (hardware interrupts - e.g: input available), or by a CPU instruction (traps - e.g: ...


15

I presume only exceptions (software interrupts) are notified via signals.What about the case of hardware interrupts. Where to begin ? There's lots of different cases. Keep in mind that interrupts are the hardware calling the cpu. Interrupts essentially consist of "hardware needs attention" and a number between 0 and 255. Signals are similar but have 2 ...


15

FIQ or fast interrupt is often referred to as Soft DMA in some ARM references.Features of the FIQ are, Separate mode with banked register including stack, link register and R8-R12. Separate FIQ enable/disable bit. Tail of vector table (which is always in cache and mapped by MMU). The last feature also gives a slight advantage over an IRQ which must ...


7

Yes - in an emulator. Otherwise, no. It's difficult to pull off, and a bad idea in any case. ISRs are (usually) supposed to work with the hardware, and hardware can easily behave very differently when you leave a gap of half a second between each instruction. Set up some sort of logging system instead. ISRs also ungracefully "steal" the CPU from other ...


6

Learn from existing code that does this kind of thing. For example: Linux (search for SAVE_ARGS_IRQ): entry_64.S OpenSolaris (search for INTR_PUSH): privregs.h FreeBSD (search for IDT_VEC): exception.S (similar is vector.S in NetBSD) In fact, "manually pushing" the regs is the only way on AMD64 since PUSHA doesn't exist there. AMD64 isn't unique in this ...


5

FIQ is higher priority, and can be introduced while another IRQ is being handled. The most critical resource(s) are handled by FIQ's, the rest are handled by IRQ's.


5

CPUs don't poll for interrupts, at least not in a software sense. With respect to software, interrupts are asynchronous events. What happens is that hardware within the CPU recognizes the interrupt request, which is an electrical input on an interrupt line, and in response, sets aside the normal execution of events to respond to the interrupt. In most ...


5

AMD needed some room to add new opcodes for REX prefixes and some other new instructions when they developed the 64-bit x86 extensions. They changed the meaning of some of the opcodes to those new instructions. Several of the instructions were simply short-forms of existing instructions or were otherwise not necessary. PUSHA was one of the victims. It's not ...


5

Reading interrupt status register through pointer cast to (volatile uint32_t*) tells compiler that reading this expression (variable at specified address) produces side effects, so it always needs to evaluate this expression. As your tmp variable is not volatile, compiler is free to optimize away storing the value of your register to variable. I think ...


4

another reason is in case of FIQ, lesser number of register is needed to push in the stack, FIQ mode has R8 to R14_fiq registers


4

Chaos has already answered well, but an additional point not covered so far is that FIQ is at the end of the vector table and so it's common/traditional to just start the routine right there, whereas the IRQ vector is usually just that. (ie a jump to somewhere else). Avoiding that extra branch immediately after a full stash and context switch is a slight ...


3

pusha is not valid in 64-bit mode because it is redundant. Pushing each register individually is exactly the thing to do.


3

All of your functions should have volatile qualifier, just like const qualifier needed for constant objects. Here is an example: class A { public: A(unsigned int a) { } void init() volatile { cout << "A::init()" << endl; } };


3

Sure. When each ISR sends a message to the queue, put something in the message that identifies the ISR that sent it. Then, when the receiver reads the queue, it can decide which action to take based on the identifier. ISR1() { char msg[4]; msg[0] = '1'; // Identify the queue get_3_ISR1_data_bytes(msg+1); // Get the data ...


3

The interrupts still fire, but the CPU isn't listening. When you start listening again (sti), the signal is still there and will take effect at the first opportunity. A PC PIC has several levels of interrupts, and I believe it can hold one active interrupt for each priority level. It will keep each one of them until the CPU tells it that the corresponding ...


3

The 8259a PIC waits for the INTA signal from the CPU. The CPU sends it when starts handling the interrupt by transferring the control to the appropriate ISR. Which ISR? The PIC gives the interrupt vector to the CPU, which looks up the IVT/IDT for the address and you know the rest. The PIC won't supply the interrupt vector until it receives INTA. The 8259a ...


3

A bit of setup code stores the address of the ISR function in the interrupt vector table to say "call me back at this address when the interrupt occurs". To be clear, the ISR itself is the function that is "called back". The interrupted code is not the callback; it is merely "interrupted" and later "resumed".


3

You don't want a watchdog, since the whole purpose of the watchdog is to force a reset if the software has hung. What you're after sounds more like simply a high-priority regular timer interrupt to me. Set it up so that you restart the timer (pushing the interrupt event generation forwards in time) at regular intervals, so that the interrupt typically ...


3

The Cortex-A9 does not support L1 cache lockdown (neither instructions nor data). The drawback is that taking large chunks of the cache away (lockdown is usually done on a granularity of entire cache ways) decreases performance for everything else in the system. Not to mention the fact that if your ISR is indeed small, and it is called frequently, it is ...


2

Your condition is the perfect fit for fast interrupt. (FIQ) You only have to assign the last interrupt number for that particular ISR. While other interrupt numbers are just vectors, the last number branches directly to the code area, thus saving one memory load plus interlock. You save about three cycles or so. Besides, i-cache lockdown isn't as ...


2

Hmmm. I think there is some logic missing in your program (I will only cover the send part, since the receiver part seems to be working?): The interrupt routine gets triggered if there is space in the send hw FIFO. You then send out one single byte from the sw buffer, adjust the index and return (note that there might still be some bytes queued within the ...


2

ISR calls the interrupted function back No, it doesn't, the program counter register is restored from stack like the return instruction does. ISR is a 'callback' because it is called via its address (stored in an interrupt vector table), and not directly.


2

interrupt functions are always far. Your manually constructed far jump appears correct as far as the instruction itself is concerned, however, I bet, simply jumping (instead of calling) won't remove the stuff previously saved by new08() on the stack at its prologue (and that's potentially a lot of registers, and most importantly, there's also the return ...


2

You ran into a well known x86 wart. I don't believe the linker can stuff the address of your isr routines in the swizzled form expected by the IDT entry. If you are feeling ambitious, you could create an IDT builder script that does something like this (Linux based) approach. I haven't tested this scheme and it probably qualifies as a nasty hack anyway, ...


2

Signals and interrupts behave in pretty similar ways. The difference is that signals happen to a process (which lives in a virtual environment), while exceptions are system-wide. Certain faults are flagged by the CPU as an exception, and then mapped to a signal that is delivered to the process by the kernel. The kernel can choose to hide any exception from ...


2

I Came over this Question like after 3 years.. Hope I Can help ;) The Intel 8259A or simply the "PIC" has 8 pins ,IRQ0-IRQ7, every pin connects to a single device.. Lets suppose that u pressed a button on the keyboard.. the voltage of the IRQ1 pin, which is connected to the KBD, is High.. so after the CPU gets interrupted, acknowledge the Interrupt bla bla ...


2

No any magic about FIQ. FIQ just can interrupt any other IRQ which is being served,this is why it is called 'fast'. The system reacts faster on these interrupts but the rest is the same.


2

The simple answer is thatint 13hwill not complete successfully without the hard drive hardware interrupt IRQ 5 -int 0Dhwhich will not occur until the PIC is acknowleged at the end of keyboard hardware interrupt IRQ 1 -int 9h. The happy answer is that it is much simpler to use int 16h ah=0 to wait for a keypress.



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