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42

A scalaz-stream solution: import scalaz.std.vector._ import scalaz.syntax.traverse._ import scalaz.std.string._ val action = linesR("example.txt").map(_.trim). splitOn("").flatMap(_.traverseU { s => s.split(" ") match { case Array(form, pos) => emit(form -> pos) case _ => fail(new Exception(s"Invalid input $s")) }}) We can ...


26

Basically what you need first is rechunk input as bigger chunks, 1024 * 1024 bytes. First let's have an Iteratee that will consume up to 1m of bytes (ok to have the last chunk smaller) val consumeAMB = Traversable.takeUpTo[Array[Byte]](1024*1024) &>> Iteratee.consume() Using that, we can construct an Enumeratee (adapter) that will regroup ...


22

A good article on Iteratees was recently published in the Monad Reader: http://themonadreader.wordpress.com/2010/05/12/issue-16 This article has plenty of examples, and alternate implementations that increase in complexity as it goes.


19

The playframework 2.0 download comes with some samples. Two of which have Iteratee/Comet examples. For instance, the comet-clock sample app shows: lazy val clock = Enumerator.fromCallback { () => Promise.timeout(Some(dateFormat.format(new Date)), 100 milliseconds) } Then it is used like this: Ok.stream(clock &> Comet(callback = ...


19

There are at least three iteratee libraries: enumerator iteratee iterIO I believe that the enumerator library is the preferred one currently, because of its simplicity. It's also the one I use for my projects, if you care. The other two packages are more flexible and can be faster at times, but they are also more complicated. If you want to learn ...


16

I just wrote an article trying to explain the concepts of Iteratees provided by Play2 for those who try to discover them. http://mandubian.com/2012/08/27/understanding-play2-iteratees-for-normal-humans/ Here is the conclusion of the article because it appears I must put essential parts to answer your question. But my article is a whole and your question is ...


15

If you just want code, it's this: procFile' iFile oFile = fileDriver (joinI $ enumLinesBS ><> mapChunks (map rstrip) $ I.mapM_ (B.appendFile oFile)) iFile Commentary: This is a three-stage process: first you transform the raw stream into a stream of lines, then you apply your function to convert that stream of lines, and finally you ...


15

Since your parser works on a line at a time, you don't even need to use attoparsec-iteratee. I would write this as: import Data.Iteratee as I import Data.Iteratee.Char import Data.Attoparsec as A parser :: Parser ParseOutput type POut = Either String ParseOutput processLines :: Iteratee ByteString IO [POut] processLines = joinI $ (enumLinesBS ...


14

To do this using pipes you nest the Pipe monad transformer within itself, once for each producer you wish to interact with. For example: import Control.Monad import Control.Monad.Trans import Control.Pipe producerA, producerB :: (Monad m) => Producer Int m () producerA = mapM_ yield [1,2,3] producerB = mapM_ yield [4,5,6] consumes2 :: (Show a, Show b) ...


12

Here's a quick iteratee example using the Scalaz 7 library that demonstrates the properties you're interested in: constant memory and stack usage. The problem First assume we've got a big text file with a string of decimal digits on each line, and we want to find all the lines that contain at least twenty zeros. We can generate some sample data like this: ...


12

It's the other way around. There is a strong connection between AFRP and stream processing. In fact AFRP is a form of stream processing, and you can use the idiom to implement something very similar to pipes: data Pipe m a b = Pipe { cleanup :: m (), feed :: [a] -> m (Maybe [b], Pipe m a b) } That's an extension of wire ...


12

You can implement a limited form of FRP using stream processors. For example, using the pipes library, you might define a source of events: mouseCoordinates :: (Proxy p) => () -> Producer p MouseCoord IO r ... and you might similarly define a graphical handler that takes mouse coordinates and updates a cursor on a canvas: coordHandler :: (Proxy p) ...


12

Enumerator is a type synonym (which is similar to a typedef in C) for a function type: type Enumerator a m b = Step a m b -> Iteratee a m b So enumFileRange actually has the following type: enumFileRange :: FilePath -> Maybe Integer -- ^ Offset -> Maybe Integer -- ^ Maximum count -> Step B.ByteString ...


11

This is Gabriel, who posted Pipes. I've been working with Paolo and we have a more elegant implementation in the works that is even more powerful and typesafe than his original proposal. The short answer to your question is that the final implementation is a superset of the original Pipes and you can write the same code as before with identical behavior ...


10

PS: I wonder why Play Iteratees library has not been choosed by Martin Odersky for his course since Play is in the Typesafe stack. Does it mean Martin prefers RxScala over Play Iteratees? I'll answer this. The decision of which streaming API's to push/teach is not one that has been made just by Martin, but by Typesafe as a whole. I don't know what ...


9

Enumerator is a Play class, not a Java or Scala one. It is part of the Iteratee I/O-handling which Play provides. Iteratees are an interesting beast -- on one hand, it "pushes" data to the handler, instead of relying to the handler to pull data, and, therefore, has better performance. On the other hand, it allows the handler to control when the flow should ...


9

I think the answer is not to dualize the "generator-like" type-class, but rather to extend it with a simple Category instance equivalent to the await/(>~) category of pipes. Unfortunately, there is no way to arrange the type variables to make this satisfy all three type classes (MonadPlus, MonadTrans, and Category), so I will define a new type class: ...


6

It's not an error to pass run (or run_) an Iteratee that expects input; that's why we first pass in enumEOF. It's invalid for an Iteratee to continue expecting input after receiving an EOF. By leaving the result of http in the Iteratee monad, you can perform multiple actions in the same pipeline, such as streaming two HTTP responses into a file.


6

I have some slides on monoidal parsing that build Iteratee based Parsec streams up as an intermediate result that you might find useful. http://comonad.com/reader/2009/iteratees-parsec-and-monoid/


6

We're using Machines in Scala to pull in not just two, but an arbitrary amount of sources. Two examples of binary joins are provided by the library itself, on the Tee module: mergeOuterJoin and hashJoin. Here is what the code for hashJoin looks like (it assumes both streams are sorted): /** * A natural hash join according to keys of type `K`. */ def ...


6

EDIT here is the real solution. I left in the original post because I think its worthwhile seeing the pattern. What works for Klesli works for IterateeT import java.io.{ BufferedReader, File, FileReader } import scalaz._, Scalaz._, effect._, iteratee.{ Iteratee => I, _ } object IterateeIOExample { type ErrorOr[+A] = EitherT[IO, Throwable, A] def ...


6

Building up on comments from Travis, currently there are: Scalaz 7 iteratee package (iterv, you mentioned, is a compatibility layer with scalaz 6) A port of Conduit library Runar's scala-machines library (presentation, haskell version)


6

Yes, indeed, you still need to use threads to perform any kind of work, including communication with the database. What's important is how exactly this communication happens. ReactiveMongo "does not use threads" in a sense that it does not use blocking I/O. Usual Java I/O facilities like java.io.InputStream are blocking; this means that reading from such an ...


5

The answer is yes. With the current implementation of pipes on Hackage, an awaiting pipe terminates as soon as its upstream terminates. The same is true with guarded pipes if you use the await function. You just have the option of using tryAwait instead if you need to behave specially before termination. Besides, "guarded pipe" is just a temporary name for ...


5

https://github.com/playframework/Play20/commit/f979006a7e2c1c08ca56ee0bae67b5463ee099c1#L3R131 Does something similar to what you are doing. I fixed grouped to take care of the remaining input. The code basically looks like: val upToNewLine = Traversable.splitOnceAt[String,Char](_ != '\n') &>> Iteratee.consume() ...


5

Either you edit your prepend Enumeratee to be like the following: object Enumeratees { def prepend[T](toPrepend: T) = new Enumeratee[T, T] { def applyOn[A](inner: Iteratee[T, A]): Iteratee[T, Iteratee[T, A]] = { val prepended = Iteratee.flatten(inner.feed(Input.El(toPrepend))) Enumeratee.passAlong[T](prepended) } } } Or you get the ...


5

It's worth noting that the WebSocket itself is just a dumb container. The magic happens in various classes within play.core.server.netty. To understand what that magic is, it's instructive to look at the signature of f (the function that a WebSocket contains: RequestHeader => (Enumerator[A], Iteratee[A, Unit]) => Unit This is a function that takes ...


5

I don't know how to do it with iteratees, but here is the pipes-based solution. Some advantages of this version of the solution are: It will never bring more than one bytestring chunk into memory at a time It streams the list of files so it won't choke on a directory with a large number of immediate children It recursively traverses the directory tree, ...


5

Iteratees and Stream aren't really that similar to RxJava. The crucial difference is that they are concerned with resource safety (that is, closing files, sockets, etc. once they aren't needed anymore), which requires feedback (Iteratees can tell Enumerators they are done, but Observers don't tell anything to Observables) and makes them significantly more ...


4

As far as I know, there is no good introduction yet. I learned them by rewriting Oleg's code. So that would certainly be one path: implement a left-fold based IO layer.



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