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5

Here is a JMH benchmark of what I understood from your quite general question to be your idea. I hope it helps you make some conclusions about the efficiency you have asked about. @OutputTimeUnit(TimeUnit.MICROSECONDS) @BenchmarkMode(Mode.AverageTime) @OperationsPerInvocation(Measure.SIZE) @Warmup(iterations = 5, time = 100, timeUnit=MILLISECONDS) ...


0

1 You need to change word_list function, Your word_list functions gives dict which have only one item where key and value are same i.e. file content. Change function to get list of word from input.txt file 2 In check_dict function, write return function outside of the if-else loop because children(s, wl) function return empty list. def ...


1

You can display created_at only when this value is not the same as previous one. <h3 ng-if="data[$index-1].created_at != item.created_at"> {{item.created_at}} </h3> And you have to sort your data. E.g. $scope.data = $filter('orderBy')($scope.data, 'created_at', true); But ofc, you should improve sorting because 'created_at' ...


1

you can use https://lodash.com/docs#groupBy var json = [ { created_at: "2014-12-24", message: "Message 1" }, { created_at: "2014-12-24", message: "Message 2" }, { created_at: "2014-12-24", message: "Message 3" }, { created_at: "2014-12-21", message: "Test 1" }, ...


0

option z: sum(thing in B for thing in A) option y: sum(itertools.starmap(operator.eq, itertools.product(A,B)))


1

You might try using sets. Consider: >>> A = [['Yes','2009','Me'],['Yes','2009','You'],['No','2009','You']] >>> B = [['No','2009','Me'],['Yes','2009','You'],['No','2009','You']] sets require hashable elements, so you need to convert the lists to tuples. I'm assuming that your lists are all in some particular order, so that ...


3

Numpy Functions: Well in this case, since dct is a numpy function, it has the functionality built-in to apply it over a particular axis. Nearly all numpy functions operate on complete arrays or can be told to operate on a particular axis (row or column). So just by leveraging the axis parameter for dct function: dct( X, axis=2) you will get an ...


3

One way to keep track of the position is by returning it. In the code below I use a helper function that returns the partially-built unflattened list as well as the current index in the flattened list. def unflatten(l): def helper(l, start): if isinstance(l[start], int): ret = [] start += 1 for _ in range(l[start - 1]): sub, ...


0

Try this code... $(document).ready( function() { var url = "https://www.googleapis.com/books/v1/volumes/EXiMZwEACAAJ"; $.getJSON(url).done(function( data ){ var bookID = data.id; var title = data.volumeInfo.title; var industryIdentifiers = data.volumeInfo.industryIdentifiers; ...


0

You have two problems. The first issue is that data.items is undefined, for accessing the properties in that data object you have to do this data.nameOfProperty. Your second issue is that when you are iterating through the industryIdentifiers you have to declare a second argument to the anonymous function in the $.each call. Since the first argument is only ...


1

It is because you are wrongly using $.each, $.each has following callback structure , callback Type: Function( String propertyName, Object valueOfProperty ) The function that will be executed on every object. So, simply using , $.each(industryIdentifiers, function(result){ will produce result as index instead of your sought out value. Thus giving ...


7

If you are using java-8, you can use the map operation on Stream: V[] arr = Arrays.stream(arrayOfTypeT).map(t -> t.v).toArray(V[]::new); or even better (if good encapsulation) V[] arr = Arrays.stream(arrayOfTypeT).map(T::getV).toArray(V[]::new); So here's the benchmark (note that I'm not a JMH guru): @BenchmarkMode(Mode.AverageTime) ...


0

If you means all items is objects, you will do that, like this: func printAllDataDn(data_json map[string]interface{}) { objects := data_json["data"].([]interface{}) for _, v := range objects { item := v.(map[string]interface{}) fmt.Println(item["dn"]) } }


0

You can try to use while loop for your task


3

A Lua table has no order. It is simply a set of non-nil keys, each associated with a single non-nil value. Implementations do optimize the storage of "number"-typed keys with positive integer values beginning at 1 and ending at a point their choosing, growing and shrinking internal structures with time-memory trade-offs for the various table operations. ...


4

Yep, it will. ipairs() will iterates from index 1 to n continuously, and break in the first index which is not continuously. For example: B = {[1] = 10, [2] = 20, [3] = 30, [4] = 40, [5] = 50, [6] = 60} for i,v in ipairs(B) do print(i,v) end will print: 1 10 2 20 3 30 4 40 5 50 6 60 But, B = {[1] = 10, [2] = 20, [3] = 30, [5] = ...


3

Yes, it's guaranteed that ipairs iterate a table with integer keys from 1 in order. Whether the table is sorted doesn't matter. From Reference Manual: ipairs: for i,v in ipairs(t) do body end will iterate over the pairs (1,t[1]), (2,t[2]), ..., up to the first integer key absent from the table.


2

As I understand your question, you would like to overwrite previous prints and count up. See this answer: http://stackoverflow.com/a/5419488/4362607 I edited the answer according to PM 2Ring's suggestions. Thanks! import sys import time def counter(): for x in range(10): print '{0}\r'.format(x), sys.stdout.flush() time.sleep(1) ...


0

To solve, add this before your for loop: if not isinstance(ids, list): ids = [ids] The catch is that ids can be wither a list of ids or a numeric id. In the latter case, browse returns a single record, non iterable, instead of an iterable collection of records. The solution is to make sure ids is a list. Another possible cause for the problem is the ...


0

the solution is the format function from the str object for i in range(10): print "this is the iteration {} /10".format(i)


0

Without using itertools. My shot at this, should be fairly quick, but uses a recursive generator (python recursion depth limit, here I come...). # simple test case seqs = (1, 2, 3) length = 10 # '0' spots count zeros = length - (sum(seqs)) # partitions count partitions = len(seqs) + 1 # first and last can partitions have 0 zeros # so use a flag when we ...


0

A simple non-recursive generator solution without itertools: def fill_sequence(sequence, size): n_slots = size - len(sequence) for start in xrange(n_slots + 1): yield [0]*start + sequence + [0]*(n_slots - start) def all_placements(inner_sizes, outer_size): x, y = inner_sizes for margin in xrange(1, outer_size - sum(block_sizes) + ...


0

This solution creates all permutations of blocks of ones (a list defined by each entry in the tuple) with blocks of zeros (lists of length one) for the extra padding. import itertools as it spec = (1,2,3) nBlocks = len(spec) nZeros = 5 totalSize = sum(spec) + nZeros+1-nBlocks blocks = [[1,]*s + [0,] for s in spec] zeros = [[0,],]*(nZeros+1-nBlocks) a = ...


0

You can generate all list recursively. F(tup, limit) = [1, 1, ...1, 0] combine with all solutions of F(tup[1:], limit - len(tup[1]) - 1) [0, 1 ,1 , ... 1, 0] combine with all solutions of F(tup[1:], limit - len(tup[1]) - 2) . . . if tup is empty return a list of zero if sum(tup) + len(tup) - 1 > limit, return an empty list since there is no solution. ...


3

The simplest approach I can think of is to generate all possible combinations of 1 and 0, and filter out all of the ones that don't have the right grouping lengths. import itertools def permutations(tup, limit=10): for candidate in itertools.product([0,1], repeat=limit): segment_lengths = [len(list(b)) for a,b in itertools.groupby(candidate) if ...


0

First, Premature Optimization is the Root of All Evil. The idea that you need to go "as fast as possible" without having measured the actual run time of your program is just nonsense. You should write clear concise code, then measure performance and optimize only if needed. That said, the fastest possible read is likely going to be a memory mapped file. ...


0

For iteration in the same order you can use a simple array if performance is a critical issue (but it does not allow growing the array dynamically without some extra effort, so you should usually be aware of the final size of the array in order to use it). You can also use a List interface. Both LinkedList and ArrayList support efficient iterating and ...


0

First for loop run four times, Second for loop runs three times. So second for loop increment that variable up to 3 times. So the first iteration gives the result=3 when i=0,, Second time it will increment three, so result=6 when i=1,third iteration result=9 when i=2 , and final iteration result=12 when i=3 then loop ends. So the output is 12.


0

Table.. Table.. Table: x | y | res ---+---+---- 0 | 0 | 1 x < 4 ? y < 3 ? yes | 1 | 2 x < 4 ? y < 3 ? yes | 2 | 3 x < 4 ? y < 3 ? yes | 3 | X x < 4 ? y < 3 ? NO 1 | 0 | 4 ... | 1 | 5 | 2 | 6 2 | 0 | 7 | 1 | 8 | 2 | 9 3 | 0 | 10 | 1 | 11 | 2 | 12


2

Note the code block containing loop(s) very carefully. There are two for loops, also called nested for loop. for (x = 0; x < 4; x++) { for (y = 0; y < 3; y++) { The outer for loop will execute till x<4, i.e. 4 time, all over again. Each time, the inner for loop will execute till y < 3, i.e, 3 times(y being initialized to 0). so, (4 times ...


3

The values of your variables throughout the loops are like follows: x y result ---------- 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 2 3 1 0 4 1 1 5 1 2 6 2 0 7 2 1 8 2 2 9 3 0 10 3 1 11 3 2 12 So that's why result ends up being 12. To get 3 you should increment result just with the first loop and from 1 to 3 (0 <= x < 3 or 1 <= x <= 3): #include <stdio.h> int ...


0

Assuming you want text only (no tags) my solution is below. Output is: Some text with tags might go here. Also there are paragraphs. More text can go without paragraphs public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException { String str = "<div>" + " Some text <b>with tags</b> might go here." ...


1

In the inner loop, you only want to make connections to elements not yet visited by the outer loop: for (var i=0; i<animals.length; i++) { for (var j = i+1; j<animals.length; j++) { // ^^^ // adds connection between animals[i] and animals[j] } } That way you won't get duplicate edges (assuming that animals itself is ...


1

for (var i=0; i<animals.length; i++) { for (var j = 0; j<i; j++) { if (animals[i] !== animals[j]) { // adds connection between animals[i] and animals[j] } } } This way, each element of the array is only compared against those before it in the array. I think this is much closer to what you want.


0

You may use the C-way as it is a pod: memset(&str_instance, '\0', sizeof(str));


1

For simplicity, You may want to consider using a single macro in the following way: #define NUMBER_OF_MEMBERS 3 struct Str{ #if NUMBER_OF_MEMBERS > 0 int i1; #endif #if NUMBER_OF_MEMBERS > 1 double d1; #endif #if NUMBER_OF_MEMBERS > 2 long l1; #endif }; void f (Str & str){ #if NUMBER_OF_MEMBERS > 0 str.i1 = 0; ...


7

To initialise any PODO's data to zero in C++ use = { 0 }. You don't need to iterate over every member. StructFoo* instance = ... *instance = { 0 };


0

If the struct members are enabled and disabled by defines, then there is no other possiblity than to use the same defines for access to values of the struct. However, a struct might not be the best choice if flexibility is needed.


0

create a string by iterating and appending comma, and then do substring. "1,2,3,".substring(0,L-1) where L is length.


0

AAA.seek(0,0) This will return the set the pointer back to the start.


0

As others have commented you probably have an iterator, not a list; You can use itertools.tee to get two independent iterators from same iterable: >>> from itertools import tee >>> a = [1, 2, 3] >>> fst, snd = tee(iter(a)) # two copies of same iterator >>> >>> list(fst) # exhaust the first iterator [1, 2, 3] ...


2

There are often much better ways depending on your language. In Java 8 you should be able to use String.join(", ", listOfItems) There are a few other Join methods that work the same way in older versions of Java but I always have trouble finding them. In Groovy and Ruby I believe all the collections have join methods that work like this: assert "this is ...


1

Just print the , before the item and don't do it for the first one. You didn't mention the language but Java/C/C#/Javascript solution would be something like: for (int x = 0; x < ListSize; x++) { if (i > 0) { print ","; } print list[i]; }


0

you can check on the last item of the array in most languages. Though, it seems your issue is probably a design and not syntax issue. Any how, here is an example in javascript var ar = ['1', '2', '3', '4', '5']; for (var i = 0; i < ar.length; i++) { if (i == ar.length - 1) { console.log(ar[i]); } else { console.log(ar[i] + ','); ...


0

You probably needs something like this. I've used names instead of ID's, but I hope you get the drift... // setting up the test HashMap<String, String> borrowers = new HashMap<String, String>(); borrowers.put("Lord of the Rings", "owlstead"); borrowers.put("The Hobbit", "sven"); borrowers.put("Vacuum Flowers", "owlstead"); // find out what I ...


0

There are only Strings in your Hashmap. No Books. As there are no Books in the HashMap, you will never be able to get a Book object out of it. If you want to identify Book objects with String objects, a HashMap works, but you have to set it up in this way: HashMap<String, Book> books = new HashMap<String, Book>(); Here's a full working ...


1

This function certainly can be iterative. In fact, there's a function in the standard library that does it iteratively: std::next_permutation. You could use it like so: // v-- note: v is a copy here void every_permutation(std::vector<int> v, std::vector<std::vector<int>>& vs) { // because we need ...


3

I think what you're asking is whether this recursive function is tail recursive. Tail recursive functions can be easily rewritten as loops and don't require a stack to keep track of multiple frames of local variables. This function is not tail recursive; indeed, any recursive function that might call itself more than once per iteration cannot possibly be ...


4

You probably want obj >= thresh, using == doesn't match your problem description. Why are you comparing the previous value to None? You need to check if it's < thresh Can you clarify what the nonzero() call is for? You're not actually creating arrays inside your loop. v_1ff and v_2ff are single values. One way to fix it would be creating lists ...


1

I suspect that the mistake you're making is that you don't select correct index for the next comparision in case key[i] = key[i+1]. So if input is A,A,A,B,B you first compare i := 0 => [0]=[1] (you compare first two A) which is True. Then you probably proceed with i := 2 which means that you compare last A to the first B which causes the bug. Solution is ...



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