Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

In a depth-first search, you begin at some node in the graph and continuously explore deeper and deeper into the graph while you can find new nodes that you haven't yet reached (or until you find the solution). Any time the DFS runs out of moves, it backtracks to the latest point where it could make a different choice, then explores out from there. This ...


11

I've developed a chess engine in C# as well, and it has a branching factor around 2.5. It is definitely possible to improve your engine by many orders of magnitudes. Nowadays the general strategy is to use very aggressive move pruning based on good move ordering. You sacrifice some correctness for the being able to see some deep tactical lines. Here's an ...


7

From my understanding of the algorithm, IDDFS (iterative-deepening depth-first search) is simply a depth-first search performed multiple times, deepening the level of nodes searched at each iteration. Therefore, the memory requirements are the same as depth-first search because the maximum depth iteration is just the full depth-first search. Therefore, for ...


6

A limited depth-first search with cycle detection may return a longer path when the first path that leads to the goal is longer than any other shorter path that includes the same state. Let D be a goal state: A -- B -- C -- D \ C -- D With a depth limit of 2, if the top branch is visited first, B and C will be visited and saved in the hash table. When ...


6

From What I understand iterative deepening does DFS down to depth 1 then does DFS doen to depth of 2 ... down to depth n , and so on till it finds no more levels for exampe I think that tree would be read read visited depth A A 1 ABC ABAC 2 ...


5

If Iterative deepening using Depth, then Iterative Deepening A* use what to limit their search? The naive implementation of IDA* would just have something like threshold++ at the end of every iteration, similar to your depth++ above. This is to keep IDA* admissible. A better algorithm (that still keeps IDA* admissible) would be to increase the ...


4

The runtime does not unevaluate expressions. There's a straightforward way to get what you want however. Consider a zipper-like structure for your tree. Each node holds a value and a thunk representing down, up, etc. When you move to the next node, you can either move normally (placing the previous node value in the corresponding slot) or forgetfully ...


3

the memory usage is the the maximum number of nodes it saves at any point. not the number of nodes visited. at any time IDFS needs to store only the nodes in the branch it is expanding.only the A and C if we are expanding C (in your e.g). BFS must save all the nodes of the depth it is searching. to see the effect take a tree with branching factor 8 rather ...


3

Selecting the correct nodes can be tricky but as you have no hierarchy this works for your sample input (if you add a root element to it) <!-- start somewhere --> <xsl:template match="/root"> <root> <!-- select all with no . in the id --> <xsl:apply-templates ...


3

This is a classical case for iterative deepening. Just enter at the toplevel: ?- length(Path, N), path(0, 2, Path). The first answer will be of shortest length. And that's what you can do in Prolog very elegantly: You are starting to enumerate an infinite set, hoping that you will find what you are searching for after a finite amount of time. Since ...


3

If the tree is not balanced and the answer lies nearer to the root than the deepest leaf, then the answer will be found by a depth-limit which is less than the maximum depth of the tree, whereas depth first search may have to search half of the tree to the maximum depth before it finds the right answer. Since the number of nodes in the tree may grow roughly ...


2

With XSLT 2.0 (as implemented by Saxon 9 or AltovaXML tools) you can use xsl:for-each-group group-starting-with and a recursive function: <xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="2.0" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:mf="http://example.com/2010/mf" exclude-result-prefixes="xsd mf"> ...


2

PHP also has a very well built in DOM support which you can use to build such structures. A place to start documenting about this extension would be http://de2.php.net/dom. In your case, you first have to create a document then use DOMDocument::createElement DOMElement::appendChild to append that element to another element After you're done, call ...


2

There isn't a particularly eligant way of doing what you want. It's (probably) possible, but it would involve some pretty ugly (and slow) XPath queries using the following-sibling axis with filters on the preceding-sibling axis matching back to the current node. If it's at all a possibility, I would recommend creating the hierarchy outside of XSLT (in C#, ...


2

Here's my advice: Just implement your algorithm in the most straightforward way possible. Profile. Optimize for speed or memory use if necessary. I very quickly learned that I'm not smart and/or experienced enough to reason about what GHC will do or how garbage collection will work. Sometimes things that I'm sure will be disastrously memory-inefficient ...


2

If you really have no guidance whatsoever about where the file might be, then I don't think there's a lot you can do. You should try to minimize seeks and seek time with some tricks, but filesystems get fragmented and there's no way for you to know about that, so it's hard to do much there. Searching the files in a directory before searching a subdirectory ...


2

swap the lines zim-zam suggested and add another else (after the else if depth > 0 ) to flip maxDepth to false


2

There is multiple heuristics that you can use to reduce your branching factor. First, you should use a transposition table (TT) to store positions results, depth and best move. Before you search a move, you first check if it's already been searched at a depth >= to the depth you are planing to search to. If it is, you can simply use the result from the ...


2

At first glance, there's no reason that this won't be garbage collected properly, and why TCO won't be performed. In general, you should think about tco and garbage collection in a different way in Haskell -- lots of related questions listed here on SO seem helpful. Fundamentally you want to imagine the operational semantics of GHC Haskell as lazy graph ...


2

Basically you're asking why the following two functions have the same time complexity in terms of big O (as they're both O(n^m)): n^0 + n^1 + n^2 + ... + n^m n^m The reason is that, at some point, for values of n and m the term n^m dwarfs all the other terms of these functions. As the input grows the runtime of the function as a whole will be determined ...


2

"Exact same" time complexity is not the same as "taking the exact time". Saying "Exact same time complexity" is like saying "growing with the same speed, up to a constant factor", which is a rough estimation. For example, if b = 3, you are comparing these two sequences of numbers: 3^m, or (1, 3, 9, 27, 81, ...) 3^0+3^1+...+3^m, or (1, 4, 13, ...


1

After the timeout is reached, the ExecutorService will try to interrupt all the currently running tasks by calling Thread.interrupt() on them. This will put each of the threads to an interrupted state. sleep() quits when this state is set. So adding this check: if(Thread.currentThread().interrupted()) { return; } inside your function should do the ...


1

The global variable won't work for this. You want to have something like void search(node ** tree, int val, int remainingDepth) { if (remainingDepth == 0) return; then search(&(*tree)->left, val, remainingDepth - 1); search(&(*tree)->right, val, remainingDepth - 1); You probably also want to check left & right for ...


1

You never stop... node *search(node ** tree, int val, int depth) { if (depth <= 0) { return NULL; // not found } if((*tree)->data == val) { return *tree; } if((*tree)->left) { node * left = search(&(*tree)->left, val, depth - 1); if (left) return left; // found } ...


1

I think you can accomplish this with a boolean maxDepth = false instance variable. On each iteration of your while loop, if maxDepth == true then exit, else set maxDepth = true. In dls when you reach depth == 0 then set maxDepth = maxDepth && children.isEmpty(), i.e. set maxDepth to false if the node has any children. Also, change dls to a void ...


1

I had the same problem as yours, here's my thread Iterative deepening in common lisp Basically to solve this problem using hashtables, you can't just check if a node was visited before or not, you have to also consider the depth at which it was previously visited. If the node you're about to examine contains a state that was not previously seen, or it was ...


1

The immediate issue you're having with your recursion is that you're not returning anything when you hit your recursive step. However, unconditionally returning the value from the first recursive call won't work either, since the first child isn't guaranteed to be the one that finds the solution. Instead, you need to test to see which (if any) of the ...


1

In each step of IDFS, you are actually searching for a path which is shortest, you can't simple use hashSet. HashSet helps only when you are searching for the existence of a path where the length is unlimited. In this case, you should probably use hashMap to store the minimum step to reach the state and prune the branch only if the map value can't be ...


1

I. Here is a simple XSLT 2.0 solution (and a similar XSLT 1.0 solution follows after this one): <xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:my="my:my"> <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/> <xsl:template match="/*"> ...


1

If your branching factor and evaluation function's required time stays about the same between different rounds you might be able to use option 2. But it sounds like it might be very difficult. Option 1 has the ability to dramatically increase alpha-beta's performance if you don't have perfect move ordering already. You save the best move at every node, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible