New answers tagged

1

As the name, "hash map," implies, the underlying data-structure is a "hash table." Conceptually, it is a series of "buckets," and the key is "hashed" to determine which (one) bucket to look through to try to find that key. This is a very efficient data structure for looking for keys by value, but it has no concept of "order." Java has a very rich ...


1

If you don't know the key, then a HashMap is pretty useless! Use an ArrayList or similar instead. If your HashMap is really, really, really large (i.e. it doesn't fit in your avail. memory) then you can consider using something in the likes of: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/berkeleydb/overview/index-093405.html


2

There is no efficient way to pull the i'th entry from a HashMap. Indeed the i'th entry from a HashMap is not even a well-defined concept, since the ordering of the entries in a HashMap is unspecified. (By contrast, the entries of a LinkedHashMap can be iterated in the order that the entries were inserted. Yet even for a LinkedHashMap there is no way to "...


2

HashMap is not intended to be used this way, because the order of entries is not guaranteed. You are better of using an ArrayList, or a LinkedHashMap if you really need the key->value structure.


3

HashMap does not preserve the order of insertion. If you always want to retrieval of your data based on index values or their order of insertion, then I would suggest using a List implementation like an ArrayList which gurantees the order of insertion. You could create a wrapper object around your main data object and put them in the ArrayList and when ...


0

The problem is that nesting iterators isn't as straightforward as nesting for loops. It requires assigning Iterator.next() to an object reference, that way the iterator doesn't advance every time you need to access the element. The referencing must be done in each layer of the nest, and the second iterator must be created inside the outer loop. Then you can ...


4

std::vector<T> requires T to be CopyAssignable in C++98, Eraseable in C++11, but a plain reference is neither. In other words, references cannot be stored in std::vector. You may like to use plain pointers instead. Or std::reference_wrapper<T>, which is a pointer in disguise.


0

std::list::erase invalidates the given iterator, you need store its result in iter_list_reduspeeds: iter_list_reduspeeds = split_reduspeeds.erase(iter_list_reduspeeds); std::advance(iter_list_reduspeeds, -2);


0

You need to combine your two hasNext conditions to avoid overrun of either iterator: while (d.hasNext() && e.hasNext()) { if (d.next() == e.next.getEntityId()) e.remove(); }


1

Another way to handle exceptions would be to extract each part that throws exception in a small pure function that properly handles each exception. And then construct final result composing those functions. Optional<Resource> open() { try{ //... return Optional.of(resource); } catch { //.... return Optional....


0

A range-library provides this and other very helpful functionality. The following example uses Boost.Range. Eric Niebler's rangev3 should be a good alternative. #include <boost/range/combine.hpp> #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <list> int main(int, const char*[]) { std::vector<int> const v{0,1,2,3,4}; ...


2

This is done to avoid overflow that may happen in adding two very big integers where the addition result may become greater than the max integer limit and yield weird results. Extra, Extra - Read All About It: Nearly All Binary Searches and Mergesorts are Broken From the blog: So what's the best way to fix the bug? Here's one way: 6: int mid ...


1

Binary searching is traditionally written like so. This form of writing helps coders understand binary searching since only start, end, middle is used in a standard binary search. You could use size() rather than end-star before the loop, but you have to use end-start in the while-loop since end-start would change. You should avoid using size() for ...


2

#include <algorithm> #include <iterator> auto a_iter = /* iterator from somewhere in A */; auto const a_end = A.end(); std::copy_n(a_iter, std::min(N, std::distance(a_iter, a_end)), std::inserter(B, B.end()));


0

For the vector container and perhaps for many more containers that's work just like that: #include <iostream> #include <vector> using namespace std; int main () { vector<int> A = {4,5,6}; vector<int> B = {1,2,3}; unsigned int n = 5; B.insert(B.end(), A.begin(), A.begin() + (n > B.size() ? B.size(...


0

I suppose you could use std::copy_if with an appropriate lambda function. By example, if your containers are vectors of int, in this way #include <vector> #include <iterator> #include <iostream> #include <algorithm> int main() { std::vector<int> a { 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 17, 19 }; auto i1 = a.cbegin()+3; auto i2 =...


0

These parts were basically missing in my code and thats why I was not able to get (Log) the values of class member first : public class MyClass { int id; String name; public String getId() { return id+""; } public String getName() { return name; } } Second : Iterator<MyClass> it = taskList.iterator(); ...


0

If every other things seem fine then, you can iterate over the arraylist as: for (MyClass task : taskList) { Log.d(TAG, task.id + " " + task.name); }


1

you should do something like this instead: List<MyClass> taskList = new ArrayList<MyClass>(); taskList.add(new MyClass(1, "kumar1")); taskList.add(new MyClass(2, "kumar2")); the in the class MyClass define the constructor with parameters... AND override the toString Method in the class so you can see something human-readable when you print ...


0

Vectors are guaranteed contiguous memory, dealing with indexing them is thus very cheap. The following is perfectly acceptable: //assuption: i, i-1 and i+1 are all valid vector elements if(i + 2 < vec.size() && condition(vec[i], vec[i+2])) { vec.erase(vec.begin() + (i-1), vec.begin() + (i + 1)); } All indexing operations above are ...


2

If the vector has an odd number of elements, the advance call will try to advance the iterator past the end of the vector. This is undefined behaviour. One way to fix it is to use the following modification of the standard advance (I'm limiting to forward direction to save myself work) [untested code]: template<typename Iterator> void ...


0

There are only two class interfaces that can be traversed: Iterator and IteratorAggregate (any other must implement one of them). Iterator First element of Iterator can be obtained as follows: $iterator->rewind(); if (!$iterator->valid()) { throw new Exception('There is no any element!'); } $firstElement = $iterator->current(); If you ...


0

Just ran into this myself. We're using ORMLite on Android and were able to use methods available on the DatabaseResults member, available by calling: iterator.getRawResults() You'll have to cast it to the appropriate type before being able to do things like safely check count etc. (depending on whether or not they are available in your particular ...


1

You are missing a few things described below, and the class is not "templetized" yet, but the approach is the same as what one implementation of the Standard Template Library is using. Both iterators need a default constructor - this provides a way to make a null iterator, which you can assign later const_iterator must be constructible from iterator - Add ...


1

Yes, it can be T*, but that has the slightly annoying property that the ADL-associated namespace of std::vector<int>::iterator is not std:: ! So swap(iter1, iter2) may fail to find std::swap.


0

A food for thought - an iterator class can also be implemented by the terms of indexes instead of pointers of course, when a vector reallocates, all the pointers , references and iterators become invalidated. but at least for iterators, that doesn't have to be the case always, if the iterator holds an index + pointer to the vector, you can create non-...


10

would a simple pointer be a valid iterator type for std::vector? Yes. And also for std::basic_string and std::array. are there any advantages of using a class instead of a simple pointer for vector iterators? It offers some additional type safety, so that logic errors like the following don't compile: std::vector<int> v; int i=0; int* p = &...


0

To begin with, I recommend looking for online reference before asking questions about how a std function works. Follow links to cppreference.com to find out how they can be implemented. std::max_element finds the biggest element in the range of iterators passed to it. When also passed in a function, it will use the function instead of operator< for ...


3

A std::vector is guaranteed to be contiguous in memory, so that shouldn't be an issue. You can get the address of (read: pointer to) the first element with &*a.begin() or more easily with &a.first() To get the size from .begin() and .end(), use a.end() - a.begin()


2

If you want the entire vector, vector.data() is your friend. If you need only a part of it: std::vector<X>::iterator it1 = ... , it2 = ...; X* item = &(*it1); int elements = it2 - it1;


1

myArray[myvector.end() - myvector.begin()] for (std::vector<int>::iterator it = myvector.begin(), int i = 0; it!=myvector.end(); ++it, ++i) myArray[i] = myvector[i]// or whatever you want This is how you use the iterators; make sure to use a loop because you have the beginning condition and the end condition.


0

There are two main problems: The type of a a dereferenced iterator is a reference, it can be const, and for a std::vector it can be very different from the vector's item type. When the item type is e.g. bool, you don't want to do the sum in bool type. The following code is one solution: #include <iterator> // std::iterator_traits template< ...


0

Try this: #include <type_traits> template < typename Iter, typename Ret = typename std::decay<decltype(*std::declval<Iter>())>::type> Ret f(Iter first, Iter last) { Ret sum {}; for (; first != last; ++first) { sum += *first; } return sum; }


0

decltype(*first) returns a reference, as else we would not be able to write things like *first = 7; Regarding difference_type it's not clear what you's trying to do. The word typename is required in order to tell the compiler that a so called dependent type (the usual case is any type after a ::) is a template and not a value.


-1

You did a random thing, which works randomly. distance_type has nothing to do with your problem, it's a type which denotes the result of measuring a distance between two iterators. Since more often than not it is a integer type, you ended up being able to use it in your arithmetic. The original issue was due to the fact that dereferencing an iterator ...


0

That's not that difficult to implement. Just state precisely what functionality your project requires. Here's a dumb sample. #include <iostream> #include <array> #include <vector> #include <cassert> template<typename T, int dim> class DimVector : public std::vector<T> { public: DimVector() { clear(); } ...


6

Every time you call items.iterator() you create a new iterator. Create one iterator at the start, and use that repeatedly. private class SequenceSelector implements Selector { private final Iterator<T> iterator = items.iterator(); private T obj = iterator.next(); public boolean end() { return !iterator.hasNext(); } public T current() ...


2

After the first loop the iterator it is equal to a.end(). As result the second while loop is not executed. It is a general mistake when the scope of a local variable is too large.:) Instead of the while loops you could use for loops with the variable it that has scope of the each loop. for ( VecDoub::iterator it = a.begin(); it != a.end(); ++it; ){ std:...


0

Your sort function "sorted" your container correctly, however your control did not enter your second while loop to display the result, since its breaking condition was valid: it == a.end. So you Thought it did not sort where in fact you just did not see it. This should work: it = a.begin(); // reset or declare new while (it != a.end()) { std::cout <&...


4

You forgot to reset it to a.begin() before the second while.


0

You're not converting anything: pointers are valid iterators over vectors. Getting a pointer to the element just past the end of an array is legal, but it's not legal to dereference such pointer. ANSI C, § 5.7 paragraph 5: When an expression that has integral type is added to or subtracted from a pointer, the result has the type of the pointer operand. ...


0

(Tested in node 4.4.7, moustache 2.2.1.) If you want a nice clean functional way to do it, that doesn't involve global variables or mutating the objects themselves, use this function; var withIds = function(list, propertyName, firstIndex) { firstIndex |= 0; return list.map( (item, idx) => { var augmented = Object.create(item); ...


2

There is no conversion involved. Pointers support the same operations as random-access iterators (unary * operator, ++ and + operators, etc.) and therefore can be used as iterators. Standard-library functions which take iterators are templated on the type of the iterator, so they will take a pointer without converting it to anything. This, along with the ...


0

You can take the address of one-past-the-end of any array in C++. You cannot dereferrence and use the result, but you can compare it to other pointers to the same array and to other one-past-the-end of same array. What you are doing in the OP is defined behaviour, and represents an empty range.


-1

To be honest, I do not know the answer to your question according to any specs. Nevertheless, the problem I see with your approach is that you are tying your implementation to implementation details in the library you are using. If you tie your implementation to the interfaces exposed by the libraries you use, it is less likely that your consuming code will ...


1

I woud recommend against that design. Violation of principle of least surprise: your image class is element-type-agnostic, but the iterator is not. You have various options, all with downsides: 1. make the image class itself a template ... and provide assignment / conversion between them template <typename TElement> class Image { public: .....


1

Assuming Image is a template struct with iterator type defined in it: template <class T> struct Image { using iterator = ImageIter<T>; //... }; If you want to make the iteration generic just use the templated function like: template <class T> void iterateIf(const Image<T> &cit) { // do sth if image has T } int ...


1

The problem is, you can't remove anything from the underlying vector while inside a range based for loop. The loop in your ClearScene method deletes CLEntity3D instances, which in it's destructor changes the same vector you used in your for loop. A relatively easy fix would be to change your ClearScene to something like this: void CLScene::ClearScene() { ...


2

You can 'emulate' a break; adding an if for a boolean check at start of the foreach lambda body, before doing any intensive operation Note that I used an final Map<Boolean> to hold the boolean flag found as it's a way to declare a boolean 'variable' outside the lambda (you know, it has to be 'final') but be able to set its value in the loop boolean ...


-1

You need to throw out inheritance based polymorphism. C++ iteration in the standard library and in for(:) loops assumes value-based iterators, and inheritance based polymorphism doesn't work with value-based iterators. Instead of inheritance-based polymorphism, you should use type-erasure based polymorphism. This requires a bit of boilerplate, because the ...



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