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7

Okay. So I modified plot.mcmc to look like this: my.plot.mcmc <- function (x, trace = TRUE, density = TRUE, smooth = FALSE, bwf, auto.layout = TRUE, ask = FALSE, parameters, ...) { oldpar <- NULL on.exit(par(oldpar)) if (auto.layout) { mfrow <- coda:::set.mfrow(Nchains = nchain(x), Nparms = nvar(x), nplots = ...


6

Thank you @Andrie for telling me the answer: i.e., just surround the character variable with the textConnection function. For the sake of completeness, here is how this applied to my specific problem: m1.jags <- " model { for (i in 1:length(Y1)) { Y1[i] ~ dnorm(Beta0, Beta1) } Beta0 ~ dunif(1, 5) Beta1 ~ dunif(0, 10000) } " , ...


5

You don't need to compute p in your data set at all. Just let it be a logical node in your model. I prefer the R2jags interface, which allows you to specify a BUGS model in the form of an R function ... jagsdata <- data.frame(y=rbinom(10, 500, 0.2), n=sample(500:600, 10), x=sample(0:100, 10)) model <- function() ...


4

This really does look like a task well suited to R's Reduce: testmu3 <- matrix(NA, 108, 5) nsites = 108 np = 5 for (i in 1:nsites) { testmu3[ i, ] <- Reduce( function(x,y) x*(1-y), testp[i, ], accumulate=TRUE) } max(abs(testmu3-testmu)) [1] 0 The accumulate parameter creates a growing vector of ...


3

Jags/R had practically two problems with this line: out <- jags.parallel(win.data, inits, params, "Poisson.OD.t.test.txt", nc, ni, nb, nt); Both are related to evaluation of function parameters - he is probably not able to resolve parameters which refer to other R variables: 1) The win.data was encoded as variable names as usually for ...


3

@Frank's answer is cleaner (and faster, probably), but this will also work and might be a little easier to understand. testmu2 <- matrix(NA, 108, 5) nsites = 108 np = 5 for (i in 1:nsites) { fac <- 1 testmu2[i,1] <- testp[i,1] for (j in 2:np) { fac <- fac * (1-testp[i,j-1]) testmu2[i,j] <- testp[i,j] * fac } } ...


3

do.call() is a great go-to friend in situations like this because (from ?do.call): If 'quote' is 'FALSE', the default, then the arguments are evaluated (in the calling environment, not in 'envir'). I confirmed that the following works, producing results that match your jagsfit.p through all digits displayed by the result object's print method: ...


3

You may not be giving the full path to the model file age_problem.bug. Correcting this path should do the trick, but I usually cat models to a tempfile, like in the following code, which should work fine for you. library(rjags) N <- 1000 x <- rnorm(N, 0, 5) cat('model {for (i in 1:N) { x[i] ~ dnorm(mu, tau)} mu ~ dnorm(0, .0001) tau <- ...


2

with the function inprod and the function model.matrix you pass the matrix as follows X<-model.matrix(~covariate1+covariate2,data=data) for(i in 1:17){ beta[i] ~ dnorm(0, 0.0001)} inprod(beta[], X[i,])+log(E[i])


2

For Stan, functions will be available with the next release. The current release, v2.2.0, does not have user-defined functions as part of the language. For the proposed syntax, see: https://github.com/stan-dev/stan/wiki/Function-Syntax-and-Semantics-Design For additional Stan-related help, check the stan-users google group: ...


2

In WinBUGS, OpenBUGS and JAGS, you can't define new functions as part of the modelling language. However you can do it with low-level programming in Component Pascal (for Win/OpenBUGS) or C++ (for JAGS). For WinBUGS, see WBDev (http://www.winbugs-development.org.uk/wbdev.html). For OpenBUGS see the UDev subdirectory of the installed program, which ...


2

I do not know whether this will give you what you want. Note that the model code came from using your code and then typing LINE at the cursor. The rest is just standard bugs code, except I used tau = rgamma(1,1) for an initial value and do not know how standard that is. More than once I have seen tau = 1 used as an initial value. Perhaps that would be ...


2

The problem with the code you have posted is that you use a ~ in a non-stochastic relation, where JAGS would want you to use <- instead. The following should work: rho_half_with ~ dbeta(1, 1) # shifting and streching rho_half_with from [0,1] to [-1,1] rho <- 2 * rho_half_with - 1 Regarding the error message you mention in the comments you get that ...


2

record gelman output with something like: write.csv(gelman.diag(codaSamples)$psrf, file = "gelman.csv") to plot density of mcmc: mcmc object has a specific S3 class mcmc.list so class(codaSamples) should return mcmc.list. There is a plot S3 method for this class of object with arguments: trace and density. plot(codaSamples, trace = FALSE, ...


2

The runjags package has the function combine.mcmc. Its default setting is to combine one or more chains and return a single chain. E.g., library(runjags) fit <- combine.mcmc(multichainfit) It also has other options for combining chains.


2

Maybe I am totally off track regarding what you really want to do, but I would set up a jags model like this, using R2jags instead of rjags (just something like a different wrapper): library(R2jags) N <- 1000 x <- rnorm(N, 0, 5) sink("test.txt") cat(" model{ for (i in 1:N) { x[i] ~ dnorm(mu, 5) } mu ~ ...


2

I suspect this isn't the case, but the only obvious reason I can suspect for Y[i] and YNew[i] being always identical is if mu.eff[i] is ~zero, either because W[i] is 0 or mu[i] is close to zero. This implies that Y[] is always zero, which is easy to check from your data, but as I said it does seem odd that you would be trying to model this... Otherwise, ...


2

You can do this if you pass your independent variables as a matrix, put your coefficients into a vector, and use matrix multiplication (with inprod or %*%) to calculate your linear predictor. For example: M <- function() { for (i in 1:n) { y[i] ~ dnorm(mu[i], sd^-2) mu[i] <- X[i, ] %*% beta } sd ~ dunif(0, 100) for (j in 1:J) { ...


2

Syntax highlighting I'm using ESS 5.14 (from ELPA) and syntax highlighting or smart underscore works fine for me with GNU Emacs 24.1.1. If you want to highlight a given file, you can try M-x ess-jags-mode or add a hook to highlight JAGS file each time, e.g. (add-to-list 'auto-mode-alist '("\\.jag\\'" . jags-mode)) However, that is not really needed since ...


2

Here's one way: testmu2 <- testp*t(apply(cbind(1,1-testp[,-5]),1,cumprod)) On my computer, they almost match: > max(abs(testmu2-testmu)) [1] 2.775558e-17 I don't know about BUGS/JAGS, but the idea is to take the cumulative product of your 1-p matrix across its columns first, and then take p*result.


2

If you are using library R2jags and function jags() then function print() makes table of statistics that are stored in list element BUGSoutput and sublist summary. You can access those data directly and store as other object (or just use directly in function write.table()) and then write to text file. jag.sum<-TEST.sim$BUGSoutput$summary jag.sum ...


2

Presumably, you could just load R2WinBUGS to get access to the function. However, in general, where there is a function that you can't see the code for, try getAnywhere. E.g., getAnywhere(replaceScientificNotationR) produces: A single object matching ‘replaceScientificNotationR’ was found It was found in the following places namespace:R2WinBUGS with ...


2

You don't need to copy the write.model function unless you want to. The trick is to use write.model with textConnection. For example: require(nlme) require(rjags) require(R2WinBUGS) jdat <- list(nobs=nrow(Rail), travel=Rail$travel, Rail=Rail$Rail) jinit <- list(mu=50, tau=1, tau.theta=1) jfun6 <- function() { for(i in 1:nobs){ travel[i] ~ ...


2

The code below suggests that you can reproduce estimates in WinBUGS through R by setting a seed immediately before each run of the WinBUGS model. The first four model runs are immediately preceded by the same set.seed statement. The last two model runs are not. According to the all.equal statement the first four model runs return the identical estimates. ...


2

Problem solved: It seems that in the new version of R2Jags the correct function to call is: attach.jags(mod_ss, overwrite=TRUE) [So attach.jags instead of attach()]


2

I have added a rep function to the development version (future JAGS 4.0.0) as Matt and John have alluded to, this requires the second argument to be fixed so that the length of the resulting vector can be determined at compile time.


2

There is no facility for that provided within runjags, but it would be fairly simple to write yourself like so: success <- FALSE while(!success){ s <- try(results <- run.jags(...)) success <- class(s)!='try-error' } results [Note that if this model NEVER works, the loop will never stop!] A better idea might be to specify an initial ...


2

The error message means that all the random starting points tried yielded a likelihood of zero. I was able to reproduce your problem in Stan, with model data { int<lower=0> N; real x[N]; real sdev[N]; } parameters { real<lower=0,upper=20> y_min; real<lower=0,upper=4> alpha; real xtrue[N]; } model { y_min ~ lognormal(1, 1); ...


2

I think this should work: x <- as.mcmc.list(lapply(outRJ$mcmc, function(x) return(x[,'avail_int',drop=FALSE]))) Matt


2

The current subsetting code (in the function [.mcmc.list) is making a copy of each element of the list before subsetting it. I have modified the code in the development version of coda. In the meantime, Matt's workaround should do because it also avoids the redundant copy.



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