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18

It's fairly deeply nested but it doesn't seem exceptionally difficult. The first observation is that if a for-loop translates into a stream, nested for-loops can be "flattened" into a single stream using flatMap. This operation takes a single element and returns an arbitrary number elements in a stream. I looked up and found that ...


17

This would be my version of your code using JDK 8 streams, method references and lambda expressions: server.findServices() .stream() .map(Service::getContainer) .filter(Engine.class::isInstance) .map(Engine.class::cast) .flatMap(engine -> Arrays.stream(engine.findChildren())) .filter(Host.class::isInstance) ...


11

That will work properly. However, the idiomatic way from previous versions of java is still simpler and perfectly understandable. Collection<Foo> f; new ArrayList<>(f);


11

userList.forEach is expecting a Consumer<? extends User> - in other words, a method which accept a User reference and do something with it. That could be: A static method accepting a User parameter, in which case the parameter will be populated with the relevant element in the list on each iteration: staticMethod(userFromList) An instance method ...


9

yes, I suggest you try it with map() instead of forEach List<Person> people = strings.stream() .map(Person::new) .collect(Collectors.toList()); Note: while Person::new does the same thing as s -> new Person(s) it is not exactly the same. The Person::new doesn't create a lambda method but ...


8

You can use flatMap to flatten the internal lists (after converting them to Streams) into a single Stream, and then collect the result into a list : List<List<Object>> list = ... List<Object> flat = list.stream() .flatMap(l -> l.stream()) .collect(Collectors.toList());


8

String formatting is such a trivial portion of your application's performance that it's almost never worth optimizing; only think about it if profiling shows an actual hot spot. In fact, most applications use reflective JSON mappers, and their bottlenecks are elsewhere (usually I/O). The StringBuilder approach you're using is the most efficient way you can ...


8

You can use IntStream.range : IntStream.range(0,listOfAs.getList().size()).forEach(i->{...}); This won't iterate over your list. The forEach method of IntStream accepts an IntConsumer, which is a functional interface that has the method void accept(int value). In my example I supplied a lambda expression that matches that interface. You do get the ...


7

With Java 8 you can write something like this - it is not really short though... List<List<Double>> list = Arrays.asList(Arrays.asList(1d, 2d, 3d), Arrays.asList(2d, 3d, 4d, 5d)); //the largest list size int maxSize = list.stream().mapToInt(List::size).max().orElse(0); //for each index in the final list, ...


7

The main purpose of interfaces is to provide a type and a vocabulary of operations (methods) on that type. They're useful and flexible because they allow multiple implementations, and indeed they are designed to allow implementations that are otherwise unrelated in the class hierarchy. The question asks, Is it right to have an interface that will not be ...


7

Per the java.util.function Javadoc, Since: 1.8 So upgrade to Java 8, or try to find an older version of the tutorial. I'm new at this. How can you tell what you are running? I'm using Eclipse To determine your current Java version in eclipse, go to Help -> About Eclipse -> Installation Details (Button in lower Left) -> ...


7

The problem is that the first readLine() is outside the loop where the string is being processed, you should delete this: str = in.readLine(); … Because in the next line (the one with the while) you're reassigning the str variable, that's why the first line is lost: the loop's body starts processing from the second line. Finally, to use Java nio, do ...


7

There's a much simpler answer: Any stream can be turned parallel by calling .parallel(): Stream<String> lines = Files.lines(Paths.get("test.csv")) .parallel(); The .parallelStream() method on Collection is just a convenience. Note that, unless you're doing a lot of processing per line, the sequential nature of IO from ...


7

I think you're just looking for the overload which takes another Collector to specify what to do with each group... and then Collectors.counting() to do the counting: import java.util.*; import java.util.stream.*; class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { List<String> list = new ArrayList<>(); list.add("Hello"); ...


6

In java.util.Arrays there is <T> void Arrays.setAll(T[] array, IntFunction<T> generator) This doesn't take a supplier; instead it takes an IntFunction whose input argument is the array index being filled. If your objects aren't dependent upon the destination array index, you can disregard the paramter and call a supplier like this: ...


6

The difference: A java.util.Timer starts its own Thread to run the task on. A javax.swing.Timer schedules tasks for execution on the EDT. Now. Swing is single threaded. You must access and mutate Swing components from the EDT only. Therefore, to make changes to the GUI every X seconds, use the Swing timer. To do background business logic use the other ...


6

Sorry, not an answer, but hopefully at least one step towards an acceptable answer: From my analysis so far, it might be that this is simply a bug somewhere deep (deeeep!) inside the rendering pipeline. The following MVCE shows two (undecorated) frames, each containing a button. They are equal, except for the background of the frames. For one frame, the ...


6

I suspect you want this type of construct. // stop when any element evaluates to true boolean any = stream.anyMatch(t -> t); You can check this with peek Stream.of(1, 2, 3, 4).peek(System.out::println).anyMatch(i -> i == 2); prints 1 2 For a parallel example AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(); IntStream.range(0, 1000).parallel().peek(t ...


6

That isn't how you import a package, this import java.util.function; should be import java.util.function.*; To import the classes in the java.util.function package.


6

You should have: Predicate<Test> p = Test::isEmpty; and not Predicate<String> p = Test::isEmpty; There is no String in class Test { public boolean isEmpty(){ ... } } so why should there be Predicate<String> ? See the tutorial of method references. What you have here is the 3rd case "Reference to an instance ...


6

A lambda expression can be used where an instance of an interface with a single abstract method is required. You wrote, Simply because an interface happens to have single abstract method, it should not be considered as a functional interface. This is exactly correct. Having a single abstract method is a structural property of an interface, one that ...


6

If you use toArray(String[][]::new) instead of toArray() it will return a String[][] instead of an Object[] and you wont need to cast it at all (if you assign it to a String[][]).


6

There's an extra level of boxing going on in int sum1 = list.stream().reduce(0, (acc, e) -> acc + e).intValue(); as the reduction function is a BinaryOperator<Integer> - it gets passed two Integer values, unboxes them, adds them, and then re-boxes the result. The mapToInt version unboxes the Integer elements from the list once and then works ...


6

I suspect you want flatMap instead of map, and then use Collectors.toCollection to create the sorted set: final SortedSet<String> fields = files .stream() .parallel() .flatMap(x -> getFields(x).stream()) .collect(Collectors.toCollection(() -> new TreeSet<String>()); (I haven't tried that, so the syntax may be slightly ...


5

It you don't need a parallel stream you can use the length of the map as an index counter: collection.stream().forEach(i -> map.put(i, map.size() + 1));


5

I hope I don't have any silly typos, but basically what you can do is : List<Pair> list = as .stream() .flatMap(a -> bs.stream().map (b -> new Pair(a,b))). .collect (Collectors.toList()); First you create a Stream<A> from as. For each a instance 2.1 Create a Stream<B> of bs 2.2 ...


5

I am not sure if you want to use already created array, Object[] array = new Object[size]; but in case you have no problem with creating new array filled with results generated by supplier you can use something like Object[] array = Stream.generate(supplier).limit(arraySize).toArray(); // will return new array ^^^^^^^ ...


5

There is no exact match in Java for the .OfType<T>() method, but you can use the Java8's filtering features: IList<INode> myNodes = new ArrayList<INode>(); myNodes.add(new SpecificNode()); myNodes.add(new OtherNode()); List<SpecificNode> filteredList = myNodes.stream() .filter(x -> x ...


5

While DirectoryStream extends Iterable, it is not a general-purpose Iterable as it supports only a single Iterator; invoking the iterator method to obtain a second or subsequent iterator throws IllegalStateException. (Source) The iterator of the Iterable returned by Files.newDirectoryStream (DirectoryStream implements Iterable) can only be used once. ...


5

Short Advice License your software for use by others, for example apply a 2-clause BSD license to it. If you distribute 3rd party libraries or runtimes, then ensure you are in compliance with the licenses of those runtimes. Choose a distribution execution mode for your application (for example a self-contained application). Depending on how you intend to ...



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