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7

A constructor has no control over what will be returned. However, you can use static factory methods for more flexibility: public static Foo newInstance(int n) { if (n < 0) { return null; } else { return new Foo(n); } } It's better to throw an exception than return null when an invalid number is supplied: if (n < 0) { ...


6

You are calling the constructor here Circle circularObject= new Circle(radiusIn); But there is no constructor defined in your Circle class which matches the argument you are passing in. Return to your Circle class and define the constructor which takes a double argument: public Circle(double val) { //Implementation } Note that if you do not provide ...


6

The location an element is stored in the HashMap depends on the hashCode of that element at the time it is added. If after adding the element, you change a property of that element that causes its hashCode to change (in the case of an ArrayList element, removing an element from the list does exactly that), trying to find that element in the HashSet (or to ...


6

I suggest you use Java 8 which has Predicate and operations supporting predicates. enum CollectionType implements Predicate<String> { WORDS_OF_ODD_LENGTH(s -> s.length() % 2 != 0), WORDS_OF_EVEN_LENGTH(WORDS_OF_ODD_LENGTH.negate()), STARTING_WITH_VOWEL(s -> isVowel(s.charAt(0))), ...


5

One of the best summaries of access visibility that I've seen is in the Java Tutorials > Controlling access to members of a class, but it glosses over some of the key details. The question I think you are asking is answered in ยง 6.6.1 of the JLS for SE 7: "Determining Accessibility" If ... public ... Otherwise, if ... protected ... Otherwise, if ... ...


5

According to the source code, ZonedDateTime.equals uses ZoneId.equals to compare the zone id component, and that in turn compares the ids rather than the offsets. If you want two ZonedDateTime with "different but equivalent" zone ids to compare as equal, you should create them like this: ZonedDateTime zdtUtc = ZonedDateTime.of( 2015, 2, 1, 14, 30, 0, ...


4

There are a lot of ways to do that. Examples 1) JLabel. //Not recommended Add the JLabel in your JFrame, then do label.setIcon(backgroundImg); 2) JPanel Override the paint() method in JPanel(make sure you've added it to your JFrame). @Override public void paintComponent(Graphics g) { super.paintComponent(g); g.drawImage(backgroundImg, 0, 0, ...


4

If setChanged and such were public, then anything could change them. Only the object itself should be able to change them. To handle your case of ClassA that extends ClassB, you'd probably want to have a method on ClassA that returns an Observable; within ClassA, the observable is an inner class that extends Observable and which only ClassA has access to. ...


4

The problem is that you are using parallel stream together with forEach and skip action relies on the correct elements order. Excerpt from the forEach documentation: For parallel stream pipelines, this operation does not guarantee to respect the encounter order of the stream, as doing so would sacrifice the benefit of parallelism. I guess ...


4

I solved it after a lot of trial and error, turns out I should've been using a ? and set the string. PreparedStatement ps = SQLite.connection.prepareStatement( "SELECT * FROM users WHERE options LIKE ?" ); ps.setString(1, "%" + opt + "%");


4

Since this is homework, I'll give you a hint. If you've studied the Java Collections, you can stored the names in alphabetical order. If you've not got to collections yet, the you simply save them off as Strings as they come in. When it's time to display them in alphabetical order you could: - sort them before you display them - or brute force it. Loop ...


4

If you want to have a checked exception that you have to catch - but not right away - then you can define throws MissingRightParenException in the signature of your methods. class MissingRightParenException extends CalculationException { ... } class CalculationException extends Exception { ... } class MyClass { int myMathRelatedMethod(String ...


4

That's right. You must be compiling on Java 8 while your friend is on Java 7. In Java 7, the type of of the List returned by Arrays.asList(new C(), new D()); would be inferred as List<B> and a List<B> cannot be assigned to a List<A>. In Java 8, with some smarter generics, the compiler would infer a different type for the same ...


4

As you pass functionality as an argument to another method, such as what action should be taken when someone clicks a button like your example code. Lambda expressions enable you to do this, to treat functionality as method argument = code as data. See oracle linkfor more info and lambda code examples.


4

In this line for(int row; row<=1920; row++){ You are not initializing the row integer to any value. Try for(int row = 0; row<=1920; row++){ Recall that the syntax for the for loop in Java requires initialization in the first argument. Declaring a variable int row does not qualify as initialization.


3

Perhaps you are reading a blank line, or a line that does not contain a , character. In that case the split array contains only one element. Consider just checking if the split array is big enough, and skip over the line if it is not.


3

You can wrap your Vector of items with a thread safe wrapper using java.util.Collections. There is a specific method for List i.e. synchronizedList but not for Vector. This only solves part of the problem by synchronizing all the public method calls, add() and remove() etc. private Collection<Thing> things = ...


3

You miss a } after return fixTeen(a)+fixTeen(b)+fixTeen(c); and there is no need for last } public int noTeenSum(int a, int b, int c) { return fixTeen(a)+fixTeen(b)+fixTeen(c); } public int fixTeen(int x) { if(x<=12||x>=20||x==15||x==16) return x; return 0; }


3

Do this: for(int row = 0; row<=1920; row++){ A for loop of this form must initialise the loop variable in the first part of the for clause, as per the docs: for(init clause; expression; for update)


3

Hashing happens at insertion time for bucketing. If you change the object afterwards, its hashcode will change, but it will already be in its bucket. It will not be (directly) retrievable since you'll be trying to retrieve it with a hashcode different from the one you used to insert it. a1.add("a"); set.add(a1); // hashed and bucketed a1.remove("a"); // ...


3

Your runnable example never calls the keyBindings method, so they are never registered... private void createGUI() { setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE); window = getContentPane(); gamePanel = new JPanel(); window.add(gamePanel); // This is going to help... keyBindings(); } This is where debug statements and investing a small ...


3

When you pop the stack, it returns the object at the top and removes it from the stack. Try this: public static void reverse(String[] arr){ Stack stack = new Stack(); for(int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) { stack.push(arr[i]); } for(int i = 0; i <arr.length;i++) { arr[i] = stack.pop(); } } ...


3

You should use < instead of <= for (int brojac=0;brojac<=x.length;brojac++){ x[brojac]+=5; } If you have array which consists say of one element, its length will be 1, but the index of it's only element will be 0 If you try to access an element with index 1 (i.e. array.length) you will get an ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException


3

Are all my assumptions true? You are correct that HashSet is implemented using HashMap, so you will not save any memory by using HashSet instead. If you're creating maps with a large number of elements, you should construct your HashMaps with an initialCapacity to the best of your knowledge, in order to prevent repeated rehashing (thus memory ...


3

Gamma is the last element in the iteration. So the iterator stops iterating after Gamma is reached, and so it can't detect that an element has been added during the iteration. In the second loop, Gamma is not the last element anymore, since Zeta has been added. So once the iterator tries to reach Zeta, it throws the exception.


3

You cannot draw like this, the correct technique is override the paintComponent() method in a JPanel subclass and use the Graphics parameter instead. call repaint() to trigger a repaint instead of your paintSwimmingPool() method move parameters i.e. deepEnd and shallowEnd into fields and reference these from your paintComponent() method - the inner class ...


3

If your code is running like I think it's running, you appear to be trying to add 9 JButtons to your GUI 50 times a second! That's a heck of a lot of buttons -- are you sure that this is what you want to be doing? Your code also runs far afoul of Swing threading rules by making Swing calls (a lot of Swing calls!) off of the Swing event thread. Your main ...


3

In general for the getB() call there is no "happens before relationship", no visibility guarantee. It is important to synchronize both reads and writes, and to synchronize them on the same lock. However, if getB() is called after getA() in the same thread, then the "happens before relationship" has already been established, and the thread is guaranteed to ...


3

The method invoked for fs.m(ff) is determined by the runtime type of fs. That runtime type is Second, and since Second overrides the public String m(First x) method, that method is executed. fs has access do the methods declared in First class, since it is of type First, but during runtime, the actual methods that get executed depend on whether those ...


3

It is possible. Right click on your project -> Build Path -> Configure Build Path. Switch to the Projects tab and add one. It will work as a library. P.S. You might also want to check this: Creating a java library with Eclipse



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