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17

This has nothing to do with BigInteger, this is happening because your calculate() method is calling itself. Once you've gotten your call stack deep enough, you run out of memory and the JVM throws the StackOverflowError. You don't have any sort of termination condition in your calculate method. Each time you enter the while loop, you kick off another ...


8

num is a long. When you compare an int with a long like x < num, the int will be promoted to a long. Assuming your num is big enough (bigger than the max value of an int), x will never reach it and your x++ will be executed. At some point, the value of x will overflow and become 0.


7

You can use IntStream.range : IntStream.range(0,listOfAs.getList().size()).forEach(i->{...}); This won't iterate over your list. The forEach method of IntStream accepts an IntConsumer, which is a functional interface that has the method void accept(int value). In my example I supplied a lambda expression that matches that interface. You do get the ...


7

Any Throwable is caught only once,the first catch block which can handle an exception


7

You can get a reference to the button pushed through the ActionEvent's getSource() method. e.g., public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) { JButton selectedButton = (JButton) e.getSource(); } Now, if you need to know where the button is in your grid, you will need to do more work, such as putting your buttons into an array or ArrayList, ...


8

Because of the size, you'll surely want to load the file in the background to avoid blocking the event dispatch thread. SwingWorker is a common choice. Instead of using a Document, consider updating a TableModel and displaying the lines of text in the rows of a JTable. This offers several advantages: Results will begin appearing immediately, and there will ...


6

Sadly, if you use super(...); it must be the very first line of code in the constructor. There is no way to avoid this. One solution would be to create another constructor that doesn't throw those exceptions. It may be sensible to scope this as protected, rather than public. You would want to document the API to make it clear which input validation (or ...


6

You are performing Java's integer division with 1000/999, which must result in another int, i.e. 1. The logarithm, any base, of 1 is 0, and dividing by 0 gets you Infinity. Use double literals or cast one of the int literals as a double: Math.log(1000.0 / 999.0) or Math.log( (double) 1000 / 999)


6

In another answer, default locale already gave an example for why comparing only uppercase is not enough, namely the ASCII letter "I" and the capital I with dot "İ". Now you might wonder, why do they not just compare only lowercase instead of both upper and lower case, if it catches more cases than uppercase? The answer is, it does not catch more cases, it ...


7

Accessing static members through an instance reference is a quirk of Java's, nothing related to object orientation. The correct way (both in C# and Java) is to access takeAway via the class reference, StaticVerifier.takeAway(). Java allows you to use an instance reference, but again, that's a quirk, and I believe it's just about only Java that has that ...


6

The problem is that your query does not select entities, but just properties of entities. Therefore the result will not be a list of entities, but a list of object arrays (which arrays will hold the selected properties). Try this: List<Object[]> groupList = (List<Object[]>) query.list(); for(Object[] arr : groupList) { ...


5

you can use the famous for loop: for(int i = 0; i < listOfAs.getList().size(); i++){ } This will not iterate through the elements of your list.


5

The Oracle docs:- Troubleshooting Memory Leaks has detailed explanation on it: This error is thrown when there is insufficient space to allocate an object in the Java heap or in a particular area of the heap. The garbage collector cannot make any further space available to accommodate a new object, and the heap cannot be expanded further. ...


5

If you face it in production and you cannot really reason about it from stacktraces or logs, you need to analyze what was in there. Get the VM to dump on OOM -XX:+HeapDumpOnOutOfMemoryError -XX:HeapDumpPath="/tmp" And use that for analysis. The memory analyzer tool (http://eclipse.org/mat/) is a good standalone program for this analysis.


5

In examples like this, it is developer performance you should worry about. What is the cleanest and simplest code and this will often be a pattern the JIT optimiser will do a good job, if not it's best job with. In this example, even if you could measure a difference I would suspect your test is broken. the difference would be different on different ...


5

You should simply push up try...catch block from method outside them: try { con.setAutoCommit(false); dbConnector.insertClient(... dbConnector.insertPortfolio(... dbConnector.insertClientFees(... con.commit(); } catch(SQLException e) { try { con.rollback(); e.printStackTrace(); return "Failed to ...


5

The pattern letter a is the Am/pm marker, but it is locale specific. Obviously AM and PM are valid in the English locale, but they are not valid in the Hungarian locale for example. You get ParseException because you have a non-english locale set, and in your locale PM is invalid. // This is OK, English locale, "PM" is valid in English ...


5

You should read documentation about collections. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Collections.html


4

if (isTesting == false) is a bit dangerous, because you could forget an = sign and write if (isTesting = false) which compiles (it assigns false to isTesting, and evaluates to false). if (false == isTesting) avoids the problem because forgetting an = would make the code invalid. But it's much too verbose, and compares what is already a boolean to ...


4

The first element added to the list would have index 0. The last element added would have the index listA.size()-1. However, you should note that if you remove elements from the list, some of the indices (indices of elements that had higher index than the removed element) would change. For example, if you remove the n'th element, the former (n+1)'th element ...


4

The error message is correct, this for (Bags bag : Bags.values()) { for (int bagId : bag.getId()) { // <-- HERE! if (bagId == index) { return bag; } } } Is not legal. I think you wanted for (Bags bag : Bags.values()) { if (bag.getId() == index) { return bag; } } Because getId() returns a single int.


4

This isn't specified in the Java specification. This means each JVM can do it however it wants to as long as it works and follows Java's memory guarantees. A good guess on how this works with a moving GC, would be each thread gets its own allocation zone. Where it does a simple pointer increase when allocating objects. Very simple and very quick allocation ...


4

Unfortunately what you described is not possible because of type erasure, so at runtime T is treated as Object so pr(Object) is chosen here. One of possible solutions would be manually testing type of passed data and invoking correct method with little help of casting like public <T> void go(T x) { if (x instanceof String) pr((String)x); ...


4

Because T extends Comparable, you should be using the compareTo method instead, for example... static <T extends Comparable<T>> T Max(T[] arr) { T current = arr[0]; for (int i = 1; i < arr.length; i++) { if (arr[i].compareTo(current) > 0) { current = arr[i]; } } return current; } From the ...


4

When executing in parallel, there is overhead of decomposing the input set, creating tasks to represent the different portions of the calculation, distributing the actions across threads, waiting for results, combining results, etc. This is over and above the work of actually solving the problem. If a parallel framework were to always decompose problems ...


4

problem: testing.number You are getting the same number from that instance of Testing which is not incremented thus giving you 3 all the time solution: use your Yupp object to get the incremented value from the method call doMath sample: JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, yupp.number); yupp.doMath(); JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, ...


4

In short: You are creating two different objects: Testing testing = new Testing(); Yupp yupp = new Yupp(); then, you are calling the operation (doMath) in one (yupp), but printing the attribute number of the other (testing). The last one, doesn't change in the whole program.


4

Here i have some navigation and code information shortcut for eclipse Ctrl+Alt+h Open Call Hierarchy Ctrl+u Find occurrences of expression in current file Ctrl+move over method Open Declaration or Implementation Ctrl+o Show code outline / structure F2 Open class, method, or variable information (tooltip text) F3 Open ...


4

If you don't need the last inch of performance, you can solve this rather directly, without an extra step to sort the map, by using SortedMap: Map<String,String> result = new TreeMap<>(Comparator.comparingInt(Integer::parseInt)); If you are among the unfortunate bunch who are still being denied access to Java 8, you'll have to implement the ...


4

You simply try like this: for(String s : yourStringList) { intList.add(Integer.valueOf(s)); } EDIT for (List<String> s : yourStringList) { List<Integer> x = new ArrayList<Integer>(); for (String str: s) { x.add(Integer.parseInt(str)); } intList.add(x); }



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