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11

You'd basically have to convert it to a pair of methods: public Unit[] getUnits() { // Method body } public void setUnits(Unit[] value) { // Method body } Java doesn't have properties at a language level - the above is basically just a (very common) convention. I should note, by the way, that this C# code really isn't terribly nice: There are ...


8

There is a class name, IntSummaryStatistics For example: List<Integer> primes = Arrays.asList(2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29); IntSummaryStatistics stats = primes.stream().mapToInt((x) -> x).summaryStatistics(); System.out.println(stats); Output: IntSummaryStatistics{count=10, sum=129, min=2, average=12.900000, max=29} Hope it ...


6

Looks like you want to left-pad with spaces, so perhaps you want: String.format("%3d", yourInteger); For example: int[] values = { 500, 4, 11, 234 }; for (int v : values) { System.out.println(String.format("%3d", v)); } Output: 500 4 11 234


6

No, you are losing the benefits of ConcurrentHashMap by doing that. You may as well be using a HashMap with synchronized or synchronizedMap() to lock the whole table (which is what you do when wrapping operations in synchronized, since the monitor implied is the entire object instance.) The whole point of ConcurrentHashMap is to increase the throughput of ...


6

You can do this using word boundaries in regex: bool result = true; for (int i = 0; i < searchItems.length; i++) { String pattern = "\\b" + searchItems[i] + "\\b"; // by using the &&, result will be true only if text matches all patterns. result = result && text.matches(pattern); } The boundaries ensure that the search terms ...


6

Arrays are 0-indexed in Java. This means the last value is at index NUMBER_OF_ELEMENTS - 1 Therefore, in your for loop, you should change int i=temp.length() To: int i=temp.length() - 1 Also, as @brso05 said, don't forget to change your loop-ending condition to i>=0 since the last value going backwards will be at index 0. Your for loop: for (int ...


5

Try this (note, I added an extra copy of "akka" near the end of the input string to show how it collects all matching strings): scala> val inList = List("scala","finagle","anorm","akka","actor","play","akka","jdbc") inList: List[String] = List(scala, finagle, anorm, akka, actor, play, akka, jdbc) scala> val partitioned = inList.partition(_ == "akka") ...


5

I would say you mean "Template method pattern" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template_method_pattern And maybe one suggestion: If every subclass has to override the method, then it should be abstract.


5

Your code is bad practice because it allocates a new instance. Try to use Collection.emptyList() instead. Drawback: If the consumer of your code wants to change the list, they need to make a copy of the list. But that is good practice since many frameworks return immutable lists and as a consumer, you can never be sure unless the API actually says what you ...


5

I don't see anything that aborts, but you can use ByteStreams#limit(InputStream, long) to set a maximum number of bytes to read. The InputStream returned will simply return -1 on any read(..) that goes over the limit. If you really want abort behavior, you could write your own InputStream wrapper that throws an exception if you go above some number of bytes ...


5

The class that comes closest to a Hashtable<TKey, TValue> in C# would be Dictionary. So, your declaration would be: public Dictionary<String, BleDevice> meusBLEs = new Dictionary<String, BleDevice>();


5

If that was allowed, someone could then potentially create public class Child extends BeanImpl<Integer> { public void setCreated(Integer created){ // whatever } } and Bean bean = new Child(); bean.setCreate(new NotAnInteger()); and type safety would break. You have to satisfy the interface.


5

You're calling bar() inside of the paintComponent(Graphics g) method. This method is responsible for drawing the component and can be called potentially many times and not in your control. Don't do that, but rather call it once in a constructor or some other location where it can be called just once. You're also setting the JProgressBar's value off of the ...


5

While there is no such thing as a while-not loop, you can always invert the condition: while (!(string.equals("y") || string.equals("n"))){ This is read, "while the string is not equal to "y" or "n"". You could also apply DeMorgan's identity to rewrite this as: while (!(string.equals("y")) && !(string.equals("n"))){ which is a bit clearer as ...


5

Yes, you can. But, I would strongly recommend you use Character.digit(char, int) (where the int is the radix), something like char ch = '9'; int i = Character.digit(ch, 10); System.out.printf("ch = %c, i = %d%n", ch, i); The only issue(s) I see with your approach is that it is a little more complicated, and you should validate the range if (ch >= '0' ...


4

Vector is pseudo "deprecated" in favor of the collections API List. A List may contain whatever you want it to without restriction While it would be possible to support multiple different listeners within a List, it's management would be complicated, as you'd need to walk the list each time you wanted to find a given type of listener. You'd be better of ...


4

for (int i = a; a <= b ; i++) It should be for (int i = a; i <= b ; i++)


4

use, override boolean isSelected, boolean hasFocus (built_in methods) from getTableCellRendererComponent instead of referencing back to JTable - table.isCellSelected(row, column), ba reseting Color for rest of cells in else statement, e.g. simple torso . private class StatusRenderer implements TableCellRenderer { private static final long ...


4

java.sql.Date doesn't contain time information. You should look at java.sql.Timestamp instead


4

public class Test { public Integer[] number = {42, 42}; public static void main(String[] args) { Test test = new Test(); //you create a new instance test.number[0] = new Integer(3); //change first element to 3 test.number[1] = new Integer(2); //change second element to 2 ...


4

Simply no. You can call the methods of the object of the class you have. BTW why do you want to call the method of the super class? If you need to do this then there is something wrong with your class design. Either CA should create its own method and you can call f() directly in the class CA which in turn calls the method of class A. Or the overridden ...


4

Not checking for null makes your code much cleaner, but it has its cost (it depends on the complexity of object you want to create). Returning Collection.emptyList() instead of null is a good practise as its cost is equal to zero. update Existing example of returning empty list can be even seen at Java Persistence API in method Query#getResultList(). It ...


4

This sounds like a perfect opportunity for inheritance. Most broadly you could have a List of objects and any type of object can go in. More specifically if you need a list of vehicles you would possibly have the following: interface Vehicle{ } class Car implements Vehicle{ } class Truck implements Vehicle{ } List<Vehicle> list = new ...


4

Null is a legacy from the languages with direct memory management, where pointer could point into nowhere. Modern languages and practices encourage to avoid using nulls. As a rule of thumb, try to use non-nullable variables where possible and consider using Optional instead of using nullables. You can read more about reasons here. Now regarding your case. I ...


4

Your problem is in the Java catch block. Exception is not the superclass for all possible errors; Throwable is. StackOverflowError extends Error, not Exception, so isn't caught. Catching preferably StackOverflowError itself, but also VirtualMachineError, Error or Throwable will work.


4

The usual pattern for this would be something like: public class LoginPage { // Class Data private HtmlForm loginForm; // Calling the constructor of the parent class public LoginPage() { loginForm = null; } // Normal setter - NB: Private - so I am in complete control. private void setLoginForm(HtmlForm loginForm) { ...


4

Assuming you are talking about CacheBuilder From the Google docs By default cache instances created by CacheBuilder will not perform any type of eviction.


4

In summary: Aim to design out the need to copy so many large data structures (a hard problem, I know) Avoid pointer chasing, use arrays rather than ArrayLists. If your objects contain other objects, try to replace them with primitives. The ultimate here is to reduce to an array of primitives, such as a byte array Compact your data structures, use arrays, ...


4

Well you can use Iterable.forEach: thisCollection.forEach(x -> x.setTested(true)); That's still going to iterate, of course - there's nothing you can do about that. You've got lots of objects to modify... how would you expect them to all be modified without any iteration? It's up to you whether you view the above as simpler or more complicated than ...


4

I don't think it's wrong, you can do it. int x = '9' - '0'; But if you also want it to work for hexadecimal chars 'A' = 10, 'B' = 11, etc you can do it like this int x = Character.getNumericValue('9'); Edit: based on other answer in this post Character.getNumericValue will actually go all the way to 'Z' = 35, so if you want to be safe use int x = ...



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