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7

By Default, when the same dependency is found in the dependency tree, Maven uses a closest one to the root. In your case, this means org.hibernate:hibernate-entitymanager:jar:4.3.1.Final:compile \- dom4j:dom4j:jar:1.6.1:compile \- xml-apis:xml-apis:jar:1.0.b2:compile Vs ...


7

The problem is that in the first case, the expression i is of type short, whereas the expression i - 1 is of type int. Those values are being boxed to Short and Integer respectively - the Integer isn't in the set, so can't be removed. You can fix this with a cast: for (short i = 0; i < 3; i++) { shortSet.add(i); shortSet.remove((short) (i - 1)); ...


6

If you want a dot rather than a comma, you should specify a Locale which uses dot as the decimal separator, e.g. DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.00", DecimalFormatSymbols.getInstance(Locale.US)); Basically, "." in a format pattern doesn't mean "dot", it means "decimal separator".


6

It's because CursorIndexOutOfBoundsException is a RuntimeException. It is not a checked exception. http://developer.android.com/reference/android/database/CursorIndexOutOfBoundsException.html


6

Yes you can use the keyword this to call another constructor and you respect the DRY principle (don't repeat yourself). public MyCostructor(int w, int h){ this(w,h,null); } You can read more here (section Using this with a Constructor)


6

From jls-4.12.4 A variable of primitive type or type String, that is final and initialized with a compile-time constant expression (§15.28), is called a constant variable. Also section 13.1 says (emphasis mine) 3..References to fields that are constant variables (§4.12.4) are resolved at compile time to the constant value that is denoted. No ...


5

During an override, you can modify the return type (if the new return type is a subclass of the old return type). For example : public class A { public Number getNumber() { /* ... */ } ; } public class B extends A { @Override public Integer getNumber() { /* ... */ } ; } In your sample, super.getDescriptor() may always return a DescriptorImpl ...


5

It's not enough to import a type. You need to actually provide that type on the classpath when compiling your code. It seems can not resolve "import org.apache.commons.lang3.ArrayUtil" like you haven't provided the jar containing the type above on your classpath.


5

Change Toast.makeText(this,message, Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show(); to Toast.makeText(ActivityName.this ,message, Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show(); makeText takes as first parameter a Context object, but this, in your case, refers to the object of the inner anonymous class new View.OnClickListener


5

You can find the duration using String startTime = "10:00"; String endTime = "12:00"; SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm"); Date d1 = sdf.parse(startTime); Date d2 = sdf.parse(endTime); long elapsed = d2.getTime() - d1.getTime(); System.out.println(elapsed);


5

Don't reinvent the wheel and use the frequency method of the Collections class: public static int frequency(Collection<?> c, Object o) If you need to count the occurrences for all values, use a Map and loop cleverly :) Or put your values in a Set and loop on each element of the set with the frequency method above. HTH If you fancy a more ...


5

It is a reasonably common practice to use an @NotNull annotation which is supported by some IDEs and maven plugins. In Java 8 you can write @NotNull String text; @NotNull List<@NotNull String> strings = ...; This is not a language feature, but if you need this, it is available. Note: there isn't a standard @NotNull annotation :( So the tools ...


4

You can remove any character/string from a string by using the Replace function. This allows you to specify the string you want to replace, and the value you want to replace it with. When you want to "remove" you simple use an empty string as the replace value. The following will remove all tab characters: String result = myString.replace("\t", "")


4

In case you don’t like the fact that Collections.list(Enumeration) copies the entire contents into a (temporary) list before the iteration starts, you can help yourself out with a simple utility method: public static <T> void forEach(Enumeration<T> e, Consumer<? super T> c) { while(e.hasMoreElements()) c.accept(e.nextElement()); } Then ...


4

From View source: public void setOnClickListener(OnClickListener l) { if (!isClickable()) { setClickable(true); } getListenerInfo().mOnClickListener = l; } I guess you can figure out the answer. EDIT: valid for API level 19


4

If there are a lot of Enumerations in your code, I recommend creating a static helper method, that converts an Enumeration into a Stream. The static method might look as follows: public static <T> Stream<T> enumerationAsStream(Enumeration<T> e) { return StreamSupport.stream( Spliterators.spliteratorUnknownSize( new ...


4

Depends on your Java version: Pre Java 8: List<String> lis = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList(arr)); Iterator<String> itr = lis.iterator(); while(itr.hasNext()) { String next = itr.next(); //work with next } For Java 8: List<String> lis = new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList(arr)); lis.stream().forEach((s) -> { //work ...


4

The object in the array would also be modified. It works this way because, although Java is pass by value, it's passing the value of the object reference. So in the end the array has a copy of the reference and whatever gets the result has a copy of the reference. When you modify the object itself, you're modifying the thing that they both "point" to. So ...


4

is it compulsary to override equals and hashCode methods for classes which are defined as final? Define a class as final and overriding equals() and hashCode() are two different things. Final is there to restrict a class not to be sub classed. And, equals() is there to check the equality of the instances of a class.


4

Because expectedKey.getClass() gives the Class object of runtime type of the expectedKey, which may be different from Key class. However, with instanceof, even if expectedKey runtime type is some subclass of Key class, the result will be true, because an instance of subclass, is also an instanceof the super class.


4

In Windows, a current working directory is kept for each drive (A:, B:, C: etc). When you use a drive without specifying a directory, you are referring to the current working directory of that drive. C: refers to the current working directory of drive C: C:\ refers to the root directory of drive C: In your case, the current working directory for C: is ...


4

I think you're in trouble with the static fields which don't be save with save.writeObject(this). From the ObjectOutputStream javadoc: The default serialization mechanism for an object writes the class of the object, the class signature, and the values of all non-transient and non-static fields. You should simply set unigramDict and bigramDict ...


4

Looking at your code it seems that you made a typo here: TextView DialogText=(TextView) findViewById(R.id.imageViewDialog); It should be TextView DialogText=(TextView) findViewById(R.id.textViewDialog); or whatever the name of the id for this TextView is. Apart from that, you need to learn to read the messages from the LogCat as they are often very ...


4

Characters are a kind of integer in Java; the integer is a number associated with the character on the Unicode chart. Thus, 'a' is actually the integer 97; 'b' is 98, and so on in sequence up through 'z'. So s.charAt(i) returns a character; assuming that it is a lower-case letter in the English alphabet, subtracting 'a' from it gives the result 0 for 'a', ...


4

Locking the assignment to b will, at the very least, introduce an acquire-fence before the assignment, and a release-fence after the assignment. This prevents instructions after the acquire-fence to be moved above the fence, and instructions before the release-fence to be moved below the fence. Using the ↓↑ notation: a = 5; ↓ b = 5; ↑ c = 5; The ↓ ...


4

All objects, including their individual attributes, are stored on the heap. All local variables, and their arguments, are stored on the stack because they contain primitive values or references. However, in special cases, the java virtual machine may perform escape analysis and decide to allocate objects (including your LinkedList) on a stack, but this ...


4

Does synchronized prevent reordering? It prevents some re-ordering. You can still have re-ordering outside the synchronized block and inside the synchronized block, but not from inside a synchronized block, to outside it. There is no dependency between a, b and c. That makes no difference. Would assignment to a first happen then to b and ...


4

While it behaves like a constructor, there are also differences which should be pointed out: Static factory methods do not have to return the current type, but can also return a subtype, where in contrast a constructor creates an instance of the current class. (Hypothetical) Example: public static Path create(String name) { return new ...


3

You might be able to use a structure like this: import javax.swing.*; import javax.swing.event.*; import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; public class AppletBasic extends JApplet { /** * Create the GUI. For thread safety, this method should * be invoked from the event-dispatching thread. */ private void createGUI() { ...


3

affichertable is an instance method in personne. You're trying to call it as if it's a static method in popo. You should be calling p1.affirchertable(...) or p2.affichertable(...) at a guess. Alternatively, if the affirchertable method isn't meant to depend on the state of a single instance of personne, you should change it to a static method, and call it ...



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