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10

It means you're invoking a generic static method, called of in the ImmutableMap class. It's pretty much the same as you're invoking a static method, nested in some class: SomeClass.staticMethod(); When the method is Generic, you need to provide the generic type and this is done like this: SomeClass.<Type>genericStaticMethod(); And to answer you ...


9

This int[] copiedArray = new int[4]; Creates an array reference, and assigns it to a new array with space for 4 int(s). Then, this copiedArray = Arrays.copyOf(array, array.length); creates a new array and assigns it to copiedArray. The 4 int(s) created on the previous line are no longer reachable, and are now eligible for garbage collection.


8

Failing fast is generally a good idea: if an index of -1 is passed to that method, it probably means that there is a bug in the code calling the method. If you silently use index = 0 instead, (a) the calling code may not receive the expected result and (b) you may not notice the bug until it has become quite a mess to fix. So I would simply use: public ...


8

Your code creates a new object and then immediately throws it away. This is just like when you call a function that returns a value without assigning it to a variable: int foo() { System.out.println("Ron Paul 2016!"); return 42; } public static void main(String... args) { foo(); // will print out "Ron Paul 2016!" (w/o quotes) } Here, nothing ...


7

Java allows accessing class variables (i.e. static ones) using the instance syntax. In other words, the compiler lets you write system.category, but it resolves it to TradingSystem.category, which is independent of the instance on which it is accessed. That is why you do not get NullPointerException. However, this syntax is not readable and confusing. That ...


6

The diamond operator cannot always be used in Java 8. The original plan to improve inference in Java 8 (JEP 101) had two goals: Add support for method type-parameter inference in method context Add support for method type-parameter inference in chained calls Only the first was implemented. Borrowing the example from the JEP, consider the following class: ...


6

Interesting, I've never noticed this before. When you drag the frame outside the bounds of the desktop nothing happens. However, when you drag the frame back towards the center the component is repainted but with a clipped painting area. Depending on how fast you move the frame the clip width (assuming horizontal dragging) could be a couple of pixels or ...


5

Use dateFormat.parse() instead of dateFormat.format(), since you want to parse your String into Date object. Then, when you have the Date object, format it to String with wanted format. @Jens already gave you the full code, so no need to copy it again here.


5

The problem is that with the loop, written like this, you assume that the nested arrays are all of length of 4 (and they are not). You'd better do: for (int i=0; i < array1.length;i++) { for (int j=0; j < array1[i].length;j++) { ... } }


5

If email.endsWith(".sc") returns false, the function has no return statement. Since you declared the return type as String, the function must always return a String (or null). So in your case: if (email.endsWith(".sc")) { return email; } return null; //Will only reach if condition above fails.


5

You are importing java.awt.image.ImageFilter; instead of se.lth.cs.ptdc.images.ImageFilter;.


5

?: (the ternary operator) works as a a compact if-else: if (row <= -1 || row == rows || col <= -1 || col == cols) { return false; } else { return lifeBoard[row][col]; } Whatever comes before the ? is the condition, between ? and : comes the result if the condition is true, and after : comes the result if the condition is false.


5

If something is Comparable<T>, it is comparable to a T, not comparable to a Comparable<T>. That's why the second snippet works.


5

There is nothing wrong with: public class StrongChecker extends BasicChecker implements Checker { Of course, your StrongChecker class has to implement all the methods of Checker (or inherit implementations from BasicChecker), or the code won't compile.


5

A Private function is not visible nor callable from its children; hence these are two completely different functions. There is nothing to overwrite from the perspective of the child class, because it is not aware that the parent even has a print() function.


8

You have two return types there. If you wanted to introduce a generic type T that would be public static <T extends MyObject> List<T> find() {}


4

The method you are implementing with setOnAction is public void handleEvent(ActionEvent event) ; It has a return type of void: i.e. it doesn't return anything: The method you are implementing with setComparator is public int compare(CustomCell cell1, CustomCell cell2) ; which returns a value. To use the longer form, you must have an explicit return ...


4

Remove the semi-colon after the for loop: for (int in = scan.nextInt(); in > 0; in = scan.nextInt()) The reason in is not defined for the compiler is that the semi-colon would de-scope its definition by acting as an empty body of the for loop.


4

I suppose you could do something like: if(nb.getOps() != null && String.valueOf(nb.getOps()).length() > 0) { builder.setOpS(String.valueOf(nb.getOps()); } ... assuming you don't need to explicitly set the builder's value as null if nb.getOps() is empty.


4

A Lucene index consists of multiple "segments". Each segment is only written once, either when you call commit(), or when commit() is called automatically (by setting IndexWriter to auto-commit when RAM usage reaches a given threshold). Usually when you search an index, each segment is searched sequentially and the results are merged together. The reason ...


4

Use Integer.parseInt(String s): int val = Integer.parseInt(jr1.get(k));


4

If you're trying to stop the Timer from within its ActionListener, then you can get the reference to the Timer object from the ActionEvent's getSource() method, and then stop it by calling stop() on the reference: ((timer) e.getSource()).stop(); or to break it down: // assuming an ActionEvent variable named e Timer timer = (Timer) e.getSource(); ...


4

In this case, pretending that an index exists and is the same element as the first element is confusing and can lead to subtle bugs. Here I would throw an IndexOutOfBoundsException if the index is out of range. Note that other code that calls this must be prepared to catch this exception and handle it appropriately.


4

This screams the Visitor pattern. interface Visitor{ visit(Node node); } class Node{ //... void accept(Visitor v){ //feel free to change visit order to viist children first v.visit(this); for(Node child : children){ v.visit(child); } } } Then you can make all your different calculations different ...


4

You should change d++ to r++ like @Maroun Maroun said but also: for(int d=0; d<ticBoard.length;d++){ for(int r = 0; r<ticBoard[d].length;r++){ System.out.print(ticBoard[d][r]); } System.out.println(); } Just incase your number of rows doesn't equal your number of columns.


4

You want some manner of separate thread that has a timer in it. A built in structure is the ScheduledExecutorService. A tutorial on how to use one can be found here The tutorial is kind of confusing and ugly, so here it is summarized in three steps: 1) Define a thread executor (something that manages your threads) int x = 1; // However many threads ...


4

stop() in java.lang.Thread was deprecated for good reasons: it didn't always work and could interfere with the workings of the JVM. Your best bet is to run the programs in separate JVMs. You can then kill the processes if you need to.


4

This is because the default scope of beans is @Dependent. This means that every time you fire an event, a new instance of your observer bean needs to be created so that the even gets sent to it. @PostConstruct gets invoked as part of that creation. Annotate your BeanA type with @Singleton to set its scope to singleton. Only one will ever be created for your ...


4

You have implemented the delegation software design pattern. To complete your class's intention, employ "safe publishing", which returns a copy of the internal data structure (albeit a shallow copy): public List<String> getList() { return new ArrayList<>(list); } The client can then do what they like with the list without affecting your ...


5

This problem presents several challenges. My solution below is about two hundred lines long. It's probably a little longer than the assignment requires because I generalized it to any number of terms. I encourage you to study the algorithm and write your own solution. The main obstacles we must overcome are the following. How do we generate permutations ...



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