Hot answers tagged

6

Don't suppress the warning, it's giving you good advice! You are choosing to assign each entry to the uninformative base class Object, instead of the more precise type, Map.Entry<String, String>. If you fix your for-loop you will eliminate the warning: for(Map.Entry<String, String> o : wp.entrySet()) {


6

The problem comes from your logic of replacing the strings: sntnc = sntnc.replaceAll("b", "dug>?/"); // <-- replaces with a "g" here sntnc = sntnc.replaceAll("g", "jeb..w"); // <-- so that "g" is also getting replaced here A simple solution is to drop using replaceAll. Making your code works by re-ordering the replaceAll calls is very fragile: ...


5

what youre seeing is the factory pattern. the class author (whoever wrote Calendar) decided that, for whatever reason, they dont want the class' user (you, in this case) to create a Calendar directly. usually this is because: there are various kinds of calendars, and which one you get is basically none of your business :-) maybe building a new Calendar is ...


5

In Java 8 you can check that not all lists are empty. boolean anyNonEmpty = !map.values().stream().allMatch(List::isEmpty);


5

You may try with the following pattern, below is a sample test of mine : public static void main(String[] args) { String pattern = "([-+]?[0-9]*,?[0-9]+)"; String x = "1,23132"; System.out.println(x.matches(pattern)); }


5

Yes, this will introduce bugs. The default removeAll works on the principle of an Iterator, if you modify the collection without using the iterator it will give a ConcurrentModificationException. If it gives this exception or not depends on the internal design of the Collection you are using, and cannot be relied on. Even though the current version doesn't ...


5

The issue is whether a ConcurrentModificationException, or list corruption, or endless looping, or failure to remove entries, or similar may result. ArrayList, specifically, in Oracle's JDK8, seems to be written such that those issues won't occur. Does that mean that that code is okay, then? No, it's not okay. That code: Relies on the implementation of ...


4

"why doesn't the source code of LinkedHashMap return an Object of type Set that guarantees order like LinkedHashSet?" Because LinkedHashSet is a concrete class with it's own implementation maintaining its own data, and the keyset() method must return a view of the Map, so it cannot just copy the key data to a LinkedHashSet. See javadoc: Returns a Set ...


4

If the device has a resolution of 1440x2560, why would my background get converted to 2625x4669? You put the image in res/drawable/. This is not a good choice, as that is a synonym for res/drawable-mdpi/. Hence, Android is resampling your image, thinking that you were aiming for -mdpi devices (~160dpi), so the image is about the same physical size on ...


4

You do this to prevent others from accessing your implementing type. For example, you could hide your implementing type inside a library, give the type package access, and return an instance of your interface to the users of your library: // This is what the users of your library know about the class // that does the work: public interface SomeInterface { ...


4

The last statement of the loop ensures that previousId is always equal to managerId after the loop ends, so it can never go into the if. I think you always want to send the last email because you know there was at least one request.


4

Try this boolean f1(int a, int b) { } boolean f2(int a, int b) { } void A(int a, int b) { } void testAndA(BiPredicate<Integer, Integer> p, int a, int b) { if (p.test(a, b)) A(a, b); } and if(x == 1){ testAndA(this::f1, x + 1, y); testAndA(this::f1, x, y + 1); } else { testAndA(this::f2, x + 1, y); ...


4

The name of a local variable is only meaningful at compile time. There is no way to obtain the name of a reference. Note: the reference and the Object are two different things. What you can do is get the name of a field, however there is no way to find from an object where the object has been assigned. The normal way to give an Object a name, is to give ...


4

Character.isLetter() and Character.isDigit() return a boolean value, which you're subsequently comparing to myChar, which is (somewhat misleadingly) a String. Obviously, they will never be equal. Here's a correct and simplified version: if (Character.isLetter(c)) { System.out.println(" In Upper Case : " + Character.toUpperCase(c) + ". And in lower case ...


4

Its a json object not array so change, JSONArray jsonArray = new JSONArray(userDetail); to JSONObject jsonObj= new JSONObject(userDetail); JSONArray jsonArray = jsonObj.getJSONArray("MemberList"); To manually check json use this http://jsoneditoronline.org/ CODE: JSONObject jsonObj= new JSONObject(userDetail); JSONArray jsonArray = ...


4

It doesn't need to be synchronized since the unmodifiable list is wrapping the synchronized one. But there's not much use for synchronizing on an unmodifiable list, other than for the purpose of iteration, which requires manual synchronization regardless: It is imperative that the user manually synchronize on the returned list when iterating over it: ...


4

The only place where the synchronized should be used is when you loop over it, as explained by the javadoc: It is imperative that the user manually synchronize on the returned list when iterating over it: However, you cannot do that once you wrapped it in a unmodifiableList, making it unsafe for a return result. It may return corrupted data in the case ...


4

There's an overloaded variant of flatMap, the second argument of which is the combining function that has access to the initial item and the one produced by the second observable: firstObservable.flatMap(string -> secondObservable(string), (s, s2) -> s + s2);


3

The first element, "client" is an object not an array. try JSONObject ja= new JSONObject(response.body().string());


3

There are two separate issues here. A List<Object> can in fact take any object as you say. A List<Number> can take at least Number objects, or of course any subclasses, like Integer. However a method like this: public void print(List<Number> list); will actually only take a List which is exactly List<Number>. It will not take any ...


3

Consider use of a concurrent hashmap and the method Map.computeIfAbsent() which takes a function to call to compute a default value if key is absent from the map. Map<String, String> cache = new ConcurrentHashMap<>( ); cache.computeIfAbsent( "key", key -> "ComputedDefaultValue" ); Javadoc: If the specified key is not already associated ...


3

getAnnouncement() is asynchronous operation. You have to call updateList() method after your request completed.


3

You can solve this by introducing a composite key. Just add all your fields into it and override hashCode and equals properly. After that you can put and get necessary values from some kind of Map<CompositeKey, TaxCode>. As an illistration, not all fields are included and it's better to come up with a more meaningful name: public class CompositeKey { ...


3

Personally, I'd rather keep all those value in a table and only consider the final value I could obtain with a simple SQL query. You can chose other options but you should always keep those mapping in an external source (table, properties file...) you could modify if the requirements change.


3

split returns an array. it's equivalent to: String[] tempStrArr = header.split("=", 2); String tempStr = tempStrArr[1]; Note, that both versions will throw an IndexOutOfBoundsException if there was less than 1 =-s in header, but in this version you can add: if (tempStrArr.length > 1) condition.


3

If your delimiter is only one character long, you could store the delimiters in a List, then check if the last character of the String is in this list : List<Character> delimiters = new ArrayList<Character>(); delimiters.add('.'); delimiters.add('!'); delimiters.add('?'); if(delimiters.contains(word.charAt(word.length() - 1))){ ...


3

The ThreeTen-Extra project includes java.time features that didn't make the cut for the JDK. One of these is Interval, see the Javadoc. Using Interval, this problem can be written as: Interval iv = Interval.of(start, duration); boolean contains = iv.contains(instantToCheck);


3

Probably the best is to have as delimiter a String array. That because the method endsWith use a String as a parameter. The problem is that the actual version of endsWith in the class java.lang.String doesn't accept an array of possible delimiters, but it is possible to create a custom code to do the same like the following: public class StringUtility { ...


3

This is the time to learn more about protocols. You can setup your own protocol between your server and client i.e., the first message from the server would always contain the # of strings to follow. The client would keep a note of it and then it will request for # of strings that server told in first method. EDIT: Little more enhanced protocol If you ...



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