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15344

You are the victim of branch prediction fail. What is Branch Prediction? Consider a railroad junction: Image by Mecanismo, via Wikimedia Commons. Used under the CC-By-SA 3.0 license. Now for the sake of argument, suppose this is back in the 1800s - before long distance or radio communication. You are the operator of a junction and you hear a train ...


6094

It's a time zone change on December 31st in Shanghai. See this page for details of 1927 in Shanghai. Basically at midnight at the end of 1927, the clocks went back 5 minutes and 52 seconds. So "1927-12-31 23:54:08" actually happened twice, and it looks like Java is parsing it as the later possible instant for that local date/time - hence the difference. ...


2355

Pure speculation is that you're using a terminal that attempts to do word-wrapping rather than character-wrapping, and treats B as a word character but # as a non-word character. So when it reaches the end of a line and searches for a place to break the line, it sees a # almost immediately and happily breaks there; whereas with the B, it has to keep ...


2249

== tests for reference equality. .equals() tests for value equality. Consequently, if you actually want to test whether two strings have the same value you should use .equals(). There are however a few situations where you can guarantee that two strings with the same value will be represented by the same object because of String interning. Those cases are ...


2216

This Java tutorial may be of some use to you. Modifier | Class | Package | Subclass | World ————————————+———————+—————————+——————————+——————— public | y | y | y | y ————————————+———————+—————————+——————————+——————— protected | y | y | y | n ————————————+———————+—————————+——————————+——————— no modifier | y ...


2155

If you're only interested in the keys, you can iterate through the keySet() of the map: Map<String, Object> map = ...; for (String key : map.keySet()) { // ... } If you only need the values, use values(): for (Object value : map.values()) { // ... } Finally, if you want both the key and value, use entrySet(): for (Map.Entry<String, ...


1840

Java is always pass-by-value. The difficult thing to understand is that Java passes objects as references and those references are passed by value. It goes like this: public static void main( String[] args ){ Dog aDog = new Dog("Max"); foo(aDog); if( aDog.getName().equals("Max") ){ //true System.out.println( "Java passes by value." ); ...


1753

new ArrayList<Element>(Arrays.asList(array))


1715

Strings are immutable. That means once you've created the string, if another process can dump memory, there's no way (aside from reflection) you can get rid of the data before GC kicks in. With an array, you can explicitly wipe the data after you're done with it: you can overwrite the array with anything you like, and the password won't be present anywhere ...


1643

There are several differences between HashMap and Hashtable in Java: Hashtable is synchronized, whereas HashMap is not. This makes HashMap better for non-threaded applications, as unsynchronized Objects typically perform better than synchronized ones. Hashtable does not allow null keys or values. HashMap allows one null key and any number of null values. ...


1599

Branch prediction. With a sorted array, the condition data[c] >= 128 is first false for a streak of values, then becomes true for all later values. That's easy to predict. With an unsorted array, you pay the branching cost.


1597

First a disclaimer beforehand: the posted code snippets are all basic examples. You'll need to handle trivial IOExceptions and RuntimeExceptions like NullPointerException, ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException and consorts yourself. Preparing We first need to know at least the URL and the charset. The parameters are optional and depend on the functional ...


1542

You can find an overview of a lot of design patterns in Wikipedia. It also mentions which patterns are mentioned by GoF. I'll sum them up here and try to assign as much as possible pattern implementations found in both the Java SE and Java EE API's. Creational patterns Abstract factory (recognizeable by creational methods returning the factory itself ...


1464

for (Map.Entry<String, String> entry : map.entrySet()) { System.out.println(entry.getKey() + "/" + entry.getValue()); }


1442

int foo = Integer.parseInt("1234"); See the Javadoc for more information. (If you have it in a StringBuffer, you'll need to do Integer.parseInt(myBuffer.toString()); instead).


1430

TL;DR ArrayList with ArrayDeque are preferable in much more use-cases, than LinkedList. Not sure — just start with ArrayList. LinkedList and ArrayList are two different implementations of the List interface. LinkedList implements it with a doubly-linked list. ArrayList implements it with a dynamically resizing array. As with standard linked ...


1380

The standard way to do this is as follows: /** * Returns a pseudo-random number between min and max, inclusive. * The difference between min and max can be at most * <code>Integer.MAX_VALUE - 1</code>. * * @param min Minimum value * @param max Maximum value. Must be greater than min. * @return Integer between min and max, inclusive. * ...


1324

Iterate through the entrySet like so: public static void printMap(Map mp) { Iterator it = mp.entrySet().iterator(); while (it.hasNext()) { Map.Entry pair = (Map.Entry)it.next(); System.out.println(pair.getKey() + " = " + pair.getValue()); it.remove(); // avoids a ConcurrentModificationException } } Read more on Map


1283

Here's a way using only standard Java library (note that the stream is not closed, YMMV). static String convertStreamToString(java.io.InputStream is) { java.util.Scanner s = new java.util.Scanner(is).useDelimiter("\\A"); return s.hasNext() ? s.next() : ""; } I learned this trick from "Stupid Scanner tricks" article. The reason it works is because ...


1276

This to me sounds like a reasonably common problem that junior to intermediate developers tend to face at some point: they either don't know or don't trust the contracts they are participating in and defensively overcheck for nulls. Additionally, when writing their own code, they tend to rely on returning nulls to indicate something thus requiring the ...


1271

As always with these questions, the JLS holds the answer. In this case §15.26.2 Compound Assignment Operators. An extract: A compound assignment expression of the form E1 op= E2 is equivalent to E1 = (T)((E1) op (E2)), where T is the type of E1, except that E1 is evaluated only once. An example cited from §15.26.2 [...] the following code is ...


1261

The use of scriptlets (those <% %> things) in JSP is indeed highly discouraged since the birth of taglibs (like JSTL) and EL (Expression Language, those ${} things) over a decade ago. The major disadvantages of scriptlets are: Reusability: you can't reuse scriptlets. Replaceability: you can't make scriptlets abstract. OO-ability: you can't make use ...


1214

There's another solution that also works. I found it on this forum: Go to the Build Path settings in the project properties. Remove the JRE System Library Add it back; Select "Add Library" and select the JRE System Library. The default worked for me. This works because you have multiple classes in different jar files. Removing and re-adding the JRE lib ...


1152

I just noticed you referenced my article ;) The Java Spec says that everything in Java is pass-by-value. There is no such thing as "pass-by-reference" in Java. The key to understanding this is that something like Dog myDog; is not a Dog; it's actually a pointer to a Dog. What that means, is when you have Dog myDog = new Dog("Rover"); foo(myDog); ...


1144

Press Back when you get the notification and then Next. This time it will find the JDK.


1117

The reason why the performance improves drastically when the data is sorted is that the branch prediction penalty is removed, as explained beautifully in Mysticial's answer. Now, if we look at the code if (data[c] >= 128) sum += data[c]; we can find that the meaning of this particular if... else... branch is to add something when a condition is ...


1098

Arrays.asList(yourArray).contains(yourValue)


1085

There are many ways to download files. Following I will post most common ways; it is up to you to decide which method is better for your app. 1. Use AsyncTask and show the download progress in a dialog This method will allow you to execute some background processes and update the UI at the same time (in this case, we'll update a progress bar). This is an ...


1075

Eclipse is defaulting to Java 1.5 and you have classes implementing interface methods (which in Java 1.6 can be annotated with @Override, but in Java 1.5 can only be applied to methods overriding a superclass method). Go to your project/ide preferences and set the java compiler level to 1.6 and also make sure you select JRE 1.6 to execute your program from ...


1062

(EDIT: Like other answerers, I'd definitely prefer to put the inner loop in a different method. This answer just shows how the requirements in the question can be met.) You can use break with a label for the outer loop. For example: public class Test { public static void main(String[] args) { outerloop: for (int i=0; i < 5; i++) { for ...



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